Member Case Study: Torn Labrum

author : AMSSM
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Member Question from frostyo

 

"I have a torn labrum in the right hip that I'm getting surgery for this Friday. Also the doctor is grinding some bone that caused it to tear. I'm hoping to get into the pool as soon as possible and hopefully ride the bike after that. Do you have any good ideas on returning to training? It's been a tough year for me with injuries and I hope next year will be a better one."
 

Answer from Chris Miars, D.O.

Member AMSSM

 

I am sorry you've experienced an injury-plagued season this year. While your surgeon will be dictating your return to various activities, I have several recommendations on making the most of the situation.

 

My first recommendation is to take advantage of the downtime to address common weaknesses of triathletes- core strength and flexibility. While a labral tear is not related to deficiencies in these areas, many other injuries are. Working on core strength and flexibility now will pay dividends next triathlon season in the form of improved performance and decreased likelihood of injury.

 

My second recommendation is to focus on form. When you are released to swimming and cycling, your early workouts will be lower intensity. This is a great opportunity to focus on improving performance through efficiency. For swimming, work on stroke mechanics, body position in the water and sighting skills: efficiency, efficiency, efficiency. On the bike you can focus on a round pedal stroke. Due to the surgery, you will not be able to work on an aerodynamic bike position for awhile but you can focus on pedal mechanics.

 

Finally, if you experienced several injuries this year you need to make a gradual increase in your training as you recover from surgery. Frequently, athletes try to make up for the time lost to injury and rush back into training resulting in further injury. Next triathlon season is still a long way off- focus on core strength, flexibility, skill efficiencies and make a gradual return to your training volume/intensity and you should experience a season of improved performance and decreased injury.

Chris Miars, D.O.
Southwest Sports Medicine & Orthopaedics
www.swsportsmedicine.com 

  

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date: September 25, 2009

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AMSSM

The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) was formed in 1991 to fill a void that has existed in sports medicine from its earliest beginnings. The founders most recognized and expert sports medicine specialists realized that while there are several physician organizations which support sports medicine, there has not been a forum specific for primary care non-surgical sports medicine physicians.

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avatarAMSSM

The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) was formed in 1991 to fill a void that has existed in sports medicine from its earliest beginnings. The founders most recognized and expert sports medicine specialists realized that while there are several physician organizations which support sports medicine, there has not been a forum specific for primary care non-surgical sports medicine physicians.

FIND A SPORTS MEDICINE DOCTOR

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