Overtraining vs. Overreaching. Are You Training too Much for Your System to Handle?

author : dara
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So how does this “overreaching” differ from over training? It is a matter of degree and incorporating ample rest and recovery and sensible training progressions.

By Dara Wittenburg

BT.com Contributor

 

As triathletes, we train hard; we have to balance training for this one sport that incorporates 3 disciplines. Along with this we still have to find time for the rest of our lives: family, work, sleeping and eating, with some left over for relaxation and a social life. Training also necessitates one more very important factor: rest and recovery. If we don’t have enough R and R and we have too much intensity/volume in our training, we are bound for the land of overtraining. Combine this with a lack of sleep, the great stressors of work and possible family pressures, a poor diet or not enough calories in general, and we have a recipe for gradually decreasing performance and overtraining.

 
But, as we all know, to get better we have to overload the system (which is known as overreaching); we have to train in a way that stresses the body so that it comes back stronger, faster, better. [.....]

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date: May 16, 2005

dara

I have been a personal trainer for eight years and a tri/endurance coach for five years. During that time I have trained several athletes for whom sports must fit into very busy lives. My clientele are full time mothers, office workers, schoolteachers, and entrepreneurs whose working and personal lives come before their sports.

avatardara

I have been a personal trainer for eight years and a tri/endurance coach for five years. During that time I have trained several athletes for whom sports must fit into very busy lives. My clientele are full time mothers, office workers, schoolteachers, and entrepreneurs whose working and personal lives come before their sports.

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