General Discussion Triathlon Talk » Things that *were* important when I started tri, but now I don't give a crap about: Rss Feed  
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2012-07-14 7:14 PM
in reply to: #4311745

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Expert
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Chandler, AZ
Subject: RE: Things that *were* important when I started tri, but now I don't give a crap about:
runk8run - 2012-07-14 5:10 PM
rkreuser - 2012-07-13 8:34 PM

Um, yeah. Triathlon. 

Much more important to be a partner, wageearner, father, athlete, friend, son, luddite, neighbor than a triathlete, IMHO.

Tri has gotten back in it's rightful place, in my world. 

PS. think of another pastime you'd endorse for your kids or yourself where you spend 8-20 hours a week by yourself (training), and the logistical adjustments to get to that schedule, not including the prep time of getting dressed, driving to your pool or ride or run, or recovering. Would you do that for your kids?  Your parents?

Long distance tri is the most self-absorbed sport in the world; it's for the few that ARE that self absorbed, have nothing better to do, or (the vast minority) peg that as something core to their being. The rest of the folks doing it are are trying to prove something, and will be disillusioned shortly after drinking the kool-aid, and having success. They'll move on, due to economic or life costs. Some will find a way to make that lifestyle 'normal'. That's not most of us, works for some. 

I applaud the folks that stick to shorter distance tris because it fits in their lives, and they're not smitten by the glow of the WTC marketing / IM finisher medal. Has the same (or better) health benefits, without the life costs. 

Most of the hobbies I've had have taken up that amount of time. My husband easily spends about 10 hours a week playing video games. A lot of people spend that and then some watching tv. I used to play roller derby and practices, games, and community appearances/fundraisers/bar parties easily turned it into a 15 hour/week commitment, +/-. When I was in grad school, it was a HUGE time commitment as well.

If you can manage your time well, it turns out there are a surprising number of hours in the day.

 

 

You must be super self-absorbed and delusional...Quit trying to prove something.



2012-07-15 12:52 PM
in reply to: #4311241

Subject: ...
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Edited by Fred D 2012-07-15 12:53 PM
2012-07-15 2:38 PM
in reply to: #4310098

Champion
7136
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Knoxville area
Subject: RE: Things that *were* important when I started tri, but now I don't give a crap about:

Hey... some of us really are just self absorbed narcissistic triathletes that have an absolute mess of a life otherwise and outside of tri's.

 

Have you seen my recent dating history?



Edited by Leegoocrap 2012-07-15 2:39 PM
2012-07-15 2:52 PM
in reply to: #4310098

Champion
6503
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NOVA - Ironic for an Endurance Athlete
Subject: RE: Things that *were* important when I started tri, but now I don't give a crap about:

Interval training.

Training plans.

Speed.

Finishing EVERY workout.

Without an ironman on the horizon, I only care about ENJOYING every workout.  (I have stopped mid lap when swimming became not fun).

2012-07-15 3:13 PM
in reply to: #4310881

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2012-07-15 9:35 PM
in reply to: #4310113

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Eden Prairie, MN, Minnesota
Subject: RE: Things that *were* important when I started tri, but now I don't give a crap about:
briderdt - 2012-07-13 12:45 PM
Bodaggit - 2012-07-13 10:36 AM

2) Having the coolest gear - LOL...will never happen

A HUGE +1 on this one. My tri bike is a old titanium round-tubed frame from the early 90's with 650 wheels, and I'll keep on racing that until one of us is in the grave. Fancy carbon, hidden cables, all that hoo-haw doesn't mean much to me -- the engine still drives it, and the bike I have is the most comfortable tri bike I've ever been on. And I'm also big on reliability instead of light weight. You have to get to the finish line before you can win.

 

As the proud owner and rider of a Merlin Aerial with round tubes and 650 wheels,  I like your style.  I keep saying that I'm saving up for a real tri bike some day, but old Ti is just so flippin' fun to ride.



2012-07-16 11:46 AM
in reply to: #4310098

Master
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Central Indiana
Subject: RE: Things that *were* important when I started tri, but now I don't give a crap about:

Ironman....and iron distance racing.

Admit part of what got me into my 1st tri was seeing Kona on TV.  Awesome that even 'ordinary' people could really finish such multi-sport endurance challenge.   Eventually spurred me to do a 140.6 last fall... if only to see if my old (50's) non-athlete bod could do it.  But with that checked off the bucket list, not sure I care (much) about doing another.  In my rear view mirror I understand some of Rick's points about time commitments, etc.  And now understand how much harder it is to do 2:30 Oly than (just) finish an IM.   FWIW- gave up on WTC profit machine fairly early on, and deliberately chose a NON-WTC event for my 140.6. 

This year did PR's in some distance running (HM & M), and enjoying some sprint/Oly tri's.  Don't give a crap about doing IM.....at least not this year.

2012-07-16 1:27 PM
in reply to: #4312370

Subject: RE: Things that *were* important when I started tri, but now I don't give a crap about:
pga_mike - 2012-07-15 3:52 PM

Interval training.

Training plans.

Speed.

Finishing EVERY workout.

Without an ironman on the horizon, I only care about ENJOYING every workout.  (I have stopped mid lap when swimming became not fun).

 

+1 !

I started out with the idea of losing weight and doing a full on IM, with sprint, half oly as progression.  Then I busted my butt all summer to improve 3 min on my sprint times...now I have 3 kids, all under 5, and my career is advancing. I may pick it back up later in life when the kids are more independant, but for now Im happy to do it to keep my triglicerides down and my heart healthy- less than obese is a nice plus though.  No ill feelings towards those who drink the cool aide...  

Running the whole time- I walk if I think I need to.  I ll even cut a run/ride/swim short if my wife needs help with the brat...er kids. 

Saving anyting for the run- I run the same speed no matter what- slow. 

Triathlon diet (for the most part) I eat what is around, and I drink beer.

Shaving for a race- it was fun, once.

Tri gear.  Its overpriced and I realize no gains.

Race Photos- Im always gonna look silly in still frame

Race fees- pay them or don't race. A lot of them are for charity anyway.

Looking fit at a race.  More people than not look like I do...

pace booty- the good ones move too fast 

Results- I cant dedicate a lot of time to training now, so I don't expect to beat many people (except the peole who spend the day on the couch with their video games) and even then is't 50/50....

2012-07-16 4:42 PM
in reply to: #4310098

Subject: RE: Things that *were* important when I started tri, but now I don't give a crap about:
My own race results. Now I look for the results of those who surround me. Their results and PR's are the most exciting part of a race for me.
2012-07-16 5:10 PM
in reply to: #4310098

Elite
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Laguna Beach
Subject: RE: Things that *were* important when I started tri, but now I don't give a crap about:

I think a key thing that has changed is my perspective on what others think.

I can't change that, so I don't invest energy in it anymore.

After a long time in the sport, good days, great days and other days you realize why you're here and that becomes enough.

Those for whom the individual experience is not enough, move on to other endeavors.

I am inherently a simple guy. I'm astounded by simple things- my cat's behavior, why I may run better on one day or another, how my bike fits and feels with a small adjustment, the weather, gadgets, the ocean in far away lands... a host of things. They remain important. The rest- not so much.

I shot this in Belize, and it always described the wonder of things to me:

2012-07-16 8:20 PM
in reply to: #4310098


145
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Subject: RE: Things that *were* important when I started tri, but now I don't give a crap about:

I started running first, so that taught me most of the lessons that I don't need to learn now.  Number 1 is run your own race.

Decided to start running for fitness after college, I won an award for 2nd in my AG in my first ever race.  I've seen all of 1 podium ever since that in 5 years.  I learned it's way more about my own time than trying to compete for anything AG related.  Otherwise I'd be searching for small races and crossing my fingers hoping fast people don't show up.

Better to cross the line knowing I gave it everthing than trying to clip somebody for 15th place Laughing



2012-07-16 11:37 PM
in reply to: #4310881

Subject: RE: Things that *were* important when I started tri, but now I don't give a crap about:
rkreuser - 2012-07-13 7:34 PM

Um, yeah. Triathlon. 

Much more important to be a partner, wageearner, father, athlete, friend, son, luddite, neighbor than a triathlete, IMHO.

Tri has gotten back in it's rightful place, in my world. 

PS. think of another pastime you'd endorse for your kids or yourself where you spend 8-20 hours a week by yourself (training), and the logistical adjustments to get to that schedule, not including the prep time of getting dressed, driving to your pool or ride or run, or recovering. Would you do that for your kids?  Your parents?

Long distance tri is the most self-absorbed sport in the world; it's for the few that ARE that self absorbed, have nothing better to do, or (the vast minority) peg that as something core to their being. The rest of the folks doing it are are trying to prove something, and will be disillusioned shortly after drinking the kool-aid, and having success. They'll move on, due to economic or life costs. Some will find a way to make that lifestyle 'normal'. That's not most of us, works for some. 

I applaud the folks that stick to shorter distance tris because it fits in their lives, and they're not smitten by the glow of the WTC marketing / IM finisher medal. Has the same (or better) health benefits, without the life costs. 

I'm truly glad that you have triathlon back into perspective for you, but I wish you'd phrased it like that. Your generalization is dissapointing, especially since there are so many exceptions, and looking at it from a wider perspective may not yield the same results. For example: I go to work, and i am responsible for making life and death decisions/being responsible for (at a minimum) two other live plus my own, then responding to whatever emergency happens - and potentially being responsible for those lives/safety/health. I go home and I need to meet the demands of two very active children. Triathlon and training is the only time where no one else expects something from me. The. Only. Time. Otherwise, there are no breaks, no time where mommy comes first just once, or where I can say "Sorry, I can't handle your emergency today, I'm not up for it." My point is not to rue the way my life is - i love my life. My point is that my 'balance' involves time alone, and that time is crucial for a healthy mental and physical state. And i know I'm not an exception. 8-12 hours really isn't that much to ask - especially if you do it when the rest of the family sleeps.
2012-07-17 4:53 AM
in reply to: #4310098

Master
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Subject: RE: Things that *were* important when I started tri, but now I don't give a crap about:
I have given up worrying about training plans and shaving every second off my time, not to mention shaving my legs. I work out when if fits my schedule and do my best on race day.
2012-07-17 6:27 AM
in reply to: #4310098

Pro
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Subject: RE: Things that *were* important when I started tri, but now I don't give a crap about:
My job! Now my job is just money for race entry fees and insurance in case I get hurt training.Laughing
2012-07-17 7:33 AM
in reply to: #4311748

Expert
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Cincinnati
Subject: RE: Things that *were* important when I started tri, but now I don't give a crap about:
JasenGuy - 2012-07-14 8:14 PM
runk8run - 2012-07-14 5:10 PM
rkreuser - 2012-07-13 8:34 PM

Um, yeah. Triathlon. 

Much more important to be a partner, wageearner, father, athlete, friend, son, luddite, neighbor than a triathlete, IMHO.

Tri has gotten back in it's rightful place, in my world. 

PS. think of another pastime you'd endorse for your kids or yourself where you spend 8-20 hours a week by yourself (training), and the logistical adjustments to get to that schedule, not including the prep time of getting dressed, driving to your pool or ride or run, or recovering. Would you do that for your kids?  Your parents?

Long distance tri is the most self-absorbed sport in the world; it's for the few that ARE that self absorbed, have nothing better to do, or (the vast minority) peg that as something core to their being. The rest of the folks doing it are are trying to prove something, and will be disillusioned shortly after drinking the kool-aid, and having success. They'll move on, due to economic or life costs. Some will find a way to make that lifestyle 'normal'. That's not most of us, works for some. 

I applaud the folks that stick to shorter distance tris because it fits in their lives, and they're not smitten by the glow of the WTC marketing / IM finisher medal. Has the same (or better) health benefits, without the life costs. 

Most of the hobbies I've had have taken up that amount of time. My husband easily spends about 10 hours a week playing video games. A lot of people spend that and then some watching tv. I used to play roller derby and practices, games, and community appearances/fundraisers/bar parties easily turned it into a 15 hour/week commitment, +/-. When I was in grad school, it was a HUGE time commitment as well.

If you can manage your time well, it turns out there are a surprising number of hours in the day.

 

 

You must be super self-absorbed and delusional...Quit trying to prove something.

But kool-aid is yummy!!!

I was thinking, too - I only spend about half of my training time by myself, if that. I do group bike rides twice a week, and I swim with a masters group. The only thing I always do by myself is run, and that's only because I'm coming off an injury and don't want or need a group pushing me at this point. Otherwise I could run with others, too.

I played wore a uniform and sat on the bench on a high school sports team. With practices, travel and games, that was easily a 10 hour/week commitment, for a high schooler. These days I hear it can be even more. If my kids loved it, I'd endorse it.

2012-07-17 1:54 PM
in reply to: #4310098

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Subject: RE: Things that *were* important when I started tri, but now I don't give a crap about:

<<<--------------

flying.  not enough time for both.

<<<--------------



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