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2013-02-20 1:57 PM

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Subject: older folks training

I'm 51 and very new to tri's and have been having lots of running injuries.  I just finished a HM.  I've only done 1 sprint tri.  I would like to do a 70.3 in the future but what training should I do to avoid injuries such as rest, intensity, volume etc.  I've done a search and all the plans I found are generic of age.  I know age makes a lot of difference in eye sight, hearing, color of hair etc but what about training? 

BTW, my training logs are up to date for time but I train naked (no gps, heart rate monitor or powermeter) as I'm to dumb to work them anyway and it takes my wife 30 minutes putting all the stuff on, getting it charged etc just to get out the door...lol

Any people my age with advice.  I looked on here and didn't find another link but I'm computer challenged too.

I was reading "I'm Here to Win" and Chris commented that he had to train differently as he aged. His comment got me to thinking.

Thanks,

karl



2013-02-20 2:33 PM
in reply to: #4630303

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Subject: RE: older folks training

I find it offensive you consider 51 "older folks"

Maybe you're building too fast/pushing too hard.  Maybe posture/stride is damaging you.  Maybe you're not quite in tune with the little aches before they become big pains.  Maybe you're too old for this shite and just need to sit by your walker and play bingo for fitness Undecided

A few coaching sessions may be of benefit to you.

2013-02-20 2:45 PM
in reply to: #4630303

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Subject: RE: older folks training

I’m 58 and was in overall good health, but I had never ran AT ALL prior to spring of 2008. Started out as a C25K and by Sept 08 did my first 13.1. A 26.2 11 months after I started running. First sprint tri Oct 10, first Oly Oct 11, first 70.3 Sept 12.

I followed the cookie cutter training plans. But added a few more rest days. No more than two days back to back training the same discipline. When I am in the height of training. (2x a day) I alternate disciplines, so if I run one night I don’t run the next AM (even if the plan calls for it).

For me, it is best to error on the side of rest. I have two daughters that are both distance runners and certified personal trainers. They are both constantly telling me to train less and rest more. (while they train 2x day 5 days a week

Hope this helps.

2013-02-20 3:01 PM
in reply to: #4630303

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Subject: RE: older folks training
i just turned 51 in january, and i couldnt be happier. i started this journey at around 280 and currently weigh about 240. but damn it i feel so much better than i did sitting on my a$$. i have ridden more miles than i would ever imagine, run lots of miles, and i have suffered two serious collision with cars. physically my ortho doc has put me back together multiple times-partial knee replacement, reattatch elbow tendons, next to repair my shoulder. but i couldnt be happier everytime i get out there. yes age is a number, and every journey begins with a single step. if you need a day off take it.
2013-02-20 3:05 PM
in reply to: #4630303

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Subject: RE: older folks training
You may be 'older' as in "older than people who are 50," but you are most definitely not "older folk." Seriously. I work with seniors. You don't qualify. And 50 is the new 40. So you have that going for you. Tongue out
2013-02-20 3:07 PM
in reply to: #4630389

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Subject: RE: older folks training
halfmarathondon - 2013-02-20 3:45 PM

I’m 58 and was in overall good health, but I had never ran AT ALL prior to spring of 2008. Started out as a C25K and by Sept 08 did my first 13.1. A 26.2 11 months after I started running. First sprint tri Oct 10, first Oly Oct 11, first 70.3 Sept 12.

I followed the cookie cutter training plans. But added a few more rest days. No more than two days back to back training the same discipline. When I am in the height of training. (2x a day) I alternate disciplines, so if I run one night I don’t run the next AM (even if the plan calls for it).

For me, it is best to error on the side of rest. I have two daughters that are both distance runners and certified personal trainers. They are both constantly telling me to train less and rest more. (while they train 2x day 5 days a week

Hope this helps.

X2

Dont be afraid to take a rest day if you feel you need it reguardless of the Training PLAN, go slow as your strength increases you will be able to do more & with more frequency and you won't be as wiped out, it takes time to build up to a point where your  recovery time will diminish quite a bit, It will but not like it would if you were 30 or 40. don't hesitate to switch off to a different disipline if you don't feel up to  whatever is on the training Plan, be flexable. Like if you really don't feel up to a run today fine, but maybe get on the bike or hit the pool maybe tomorrow that run will fell like a better option, I try to do something every day even if only for 30 minutes but usually I shoot for 45 min to an hour. I can now double up a few time a week without getting to worn out, but if I feel like a rest day or even 2 are in order I don't hesitate to take one, I am 58 as well.



2013-02-20 3:15 PM
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Subject: RE: older folks training

51 in a week. If you're having frequent running injuries I'd suggest having someone look at your form and review your training. I've been running since HS and have never really been injured. I have done a pretty good job getting banged up on the bike though!

Recovery does take a little longer. I don't do the same running volume I did as a kid, but my marathons have gotten more consistent as I am much better at strategy and nutrition. I'm much more structured with training, too.

It's just a number. I was actually excited about moving up an AG last year.

I didn't swim until I was 49. I'll run Boston this year and do my first IM race. Anything is possible. The only limitation is ourselves.

2013-02-20 3:21 PM
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Subject: RE: older folks training

51 this year as well....recovery time is longer I think than before. Give yourself some extra time after races. Listen to your body, that's the best indicator that something is going south.


Eat well, and sleep well.

Don't over do it, especially running...these applies to anyone, but if you try to increase your mileage too fast or don't allow yourself to recover well, you're asking for trouble.

Otherwise, go for it and have fun!

2013-02-20 3:31 PM
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Subject: RE: older folks training
Great question. I'm 54, started running in my 30s and haven't had a running injury in 8 years. Coincidentally that's when I started working with my current tri coach. And at this age I'm still looking to set PRs.

Most running injuries are blind to age -- they're usually caused by a combination of too far, too fast, too soon. Without looking at what you've been doing long term, it's hard to say which of these may or may not be a factor.

Figure out where you want the sport to take you short and long term, and find a sensible training plan or a coach that'll get you there. Don't be tempted to start too far into it -- there's nothing wrong with taking a step back now so you can take multiple steps forward later.

Ken
2013-02-20 3:51 PM
in reply to: #4630303

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Subject: RE: older folks training

La Tortuga, really is it necessary to be rude?  If you read "I'm Here to Win" you would see that even Chris trained different when he was 38 versus 25.  I saw that you have done many races, just remember this is Beginnertriathlete, not advancedtriathlete.

Everyone else, thanks for your advice.  Triathlons are great and I'm having a blast training.  I have learned so much from this site and the more we can learn the better off we are. 

Again thanks.

2013-02-20 4:31 PM
in reply to: #4630303

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Subject: RE: older folks training

I'm 65 and training for my first Sprint Tri this summer! Your a youngster!!! Laughing I find that at my age, the bike is no problem, but the run is tough on the body.With the running, I follow the run/walk plan and can feel myself slowly getting stronger and faster without incurring any injuries.  I take the Sprint training schedule and add additional rest days to it as needed. I listen to my body!! If it says " stop, rest," I take the day off or just walk instead of my normal 5k run. With the swim, if my upper body is extremely tight, I shorten my distances for that day or just swim enough to loosen things up.

Again, I don't push. At 65 years of age the adage, " no pain, no gain" surly DOESN'T work.



2013-02-20 4:40 PM
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Subject: RE: older folks training
KWDreamun - 2013-02-20 4:51 PM

La Tortuga, really is it necessary to be rude?  If you read "I'm Here to Win" you would see that even Chris trained different when he was 38 versus 25.  I saw that you have done many races, just remember this is Beginnertriathlete, not advancedtriathlete.

Everyone else, thanks for your advice.  Triathlons are great and I'm having a blast training.  I have learned so much from this site and the more we can learn the better off we are. 

Again thanks.

Yeah, so welcome to BT. The red text was used to indicate humor. We call it the sarc font (although it should be italics as well like this, old man). If you thought he was rude, DO NOT go into COJ

 

BTW, 52 here and not old. Not young, but completed my first IM at 50

2013-02-20 4:42 PM
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Subject: RE: older folks training
KWDreamun - 2013-02-20 4:51 PM

La Tortuga, really is it necessary to be rude?  If you read "I'm Here to Win" you would see that even Chris trained different when he was 38 versus 25.  I saw that you have done many races, just remember this is Beginnertriathlete, not advancedtriathlete.

Everyone else, thanks for your advice.  Triathlons are great and I'm having a blast training.  I have learned so much from this site and the more we can learn the better off we are. 

Again thanks.

Didn't mean to come off as rude.  Was just poking fun at us old folks.  Other than that, the advice I was trying to convey was "listen to your body; look into your running posture as a possible problem; look into a coach".  Sorry If I offended.

2013-02-20 4:52 PM
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Subject: RE: older folks training

58.  I switched from distance running training last year.  I've found that triathlon training is easier on my body than running.  You may find you have less injuries.  

As far as training differently, I say listen to your body.  Be sensitive to its cries for mercy.  Don't be afraid to scale back in time or intensity.  Also, don't be ashamed to take naps.  I can shred up those young whipper snappers and spit them out after I'd had a power nap.

2013-02-20 5:01 PM
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Subject: RE: older folks training
mrbbrad - 2013-02-20 11:40 AM

Yeah, so welcome to BT. The red text was used to indicate humor. We call it the sarc font (although it should be italics as well like this, old man). If you thought he was rude, DO NOT go into COJ

or ST

2013-02-20 5:02 PM
in reply to: #4630607

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Subject: RE: older folks training
b2run - 2013-02-20 11:52 AM

58.  I switched from distance running training last year.  I've found that triathlon training is easier on my body than running.  You may find you have less injuries.  

 

agree



2013-02-20 6:16 PM
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Subject: RE: older folks training

First tri last year at 51. I just followed a basic 8-week plan. No problems.

I find I have to be careful to avoid any sort of injuries, because recovery takes so long. Still easing back into running after some foot issues in late December.

I think you'll find a lot of new triathletes in their early 50s as they combat empty nest syndrome and midlife crisis.

2013-02-20 7:43 PM
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Subject: RE: older folks training

63 here.  This is just my 3rd tri season.  Three years ago i started running and could only run 100 right steps before I had to stop to walk 200 steps, then run another 100 steps, etc.  I could not swim either. Jan 12, 2013 I competed in my first HIM and won my 60-64M AG by 11minutes. I do not follow any "training plans" except my own.  I try to train every other day. Sometimes I'll skip two days between training days.  On the days I do train I'll try to do full OLY distance swim and bike and run. On my off training days I do nothing.  That way my body has at least 40 some hours of total rest between workouts and I haven't had any real injuries yet in three years.  I'm sure that there is better training routines for "the elderly", but this is what is working for me.  Listen to your body, increase intensity slowly and DO NOT GET HURT.  Hope this helps

2013-02-20 9:59 PM
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Subject: RE: older folks training

I turned 51 this year too.  I've been plagued with so many aches and pains primarily because my drive still pushes like I'm 30.

 

I think the biggest difference aging (for me anyway) is that I've lost a lot of flexibility and I hate to stretch.  I'm better doing a light, easy day than a complete rest day otherwise it takes me a day to loosen back up.  If I take any extended time off swimming I have to ease back into it over a period of a few weeks.  Again, my mind will push me beyond my bodies limits pretty easily and I am constantly tempering my effort.

I also do not do a lot of mega workouts because it can take too long to recover thus disrupting my normal weekly training schedule.  In the last four years, which included 4 marathons, 4 HIM's, 2 IM's, and dozens of shorter races, I think my longest training run was 15 miles once and usually just build to 13.  My longest ride was around 70 miles.

It also takes longer to get faster but hard work can get you faster for years to come.  I'll never be able to run like when I was younger but my tri times are getting better and this will be my best tri year.

Good luck going forward.

2013-02-20 10:52 PM
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Subject: RE: older folks training

I don't have much to add but I'll be 63 in October and I workout 5 or 6 days per week and I like to train at about 10 hours per week.

The bike is pretty straightforward I just need to get faster.

I started swimming one year ago and I'm swimming 2K comfortably. 

I started running for the first time ever in April 2011 and I'm still very carefully building up my strength and endurance.  I'll have to get a lot better this year because I'm intending to enter the Lake Stevens 70.3 in July.

Just be careful and pay attention to your body.

FWIW Sister Madonna finished IMC 2012 in 16:32:00 and she was 82. 

2013-02-21 6:49 AM
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Subject: RE: older folks training

Lots of good comments and advice. I'm a week away from 59 and I have been running for 30+ years and ran my first TRI 28 years ago. Then a 20 year gap before I got back into TRI's. Anyway, the difference for me is rest time, training intensity and stretching. I definitely take a rest day a week now when I didn't really used to, and more if I need it. I don't push myself so hard that I will get hurt or be too exhausted to get back at it the next day, and I have to stretch everyday after working out and at bedtime, to avoid some imbalance injuries and pains that come from tending to become less flexible as you get older.

Anyway, just listen to your body and enjoy! Because I still enjoy it, I plan on plugging away at this,  as long as I can.



2013-02-21 10:40 AM
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Subject: RE: older folks training

I'm 59 coming up on 60 soon.  I'll echo the comments about listening to your body, getting enough rest, etc.

In my particular case, I didn't do my first triathlon or any serious/consistent endurance training until age 50, which I think has been an advantage in some ways.  While many life-long endurance athletes are bemoaning their loss of performance with age, I'm still improving my endurance fitness and performance.

True, I've been a pretty consistent BOPer so far, but I'm finding ways to sneak up on the MOP.  Wink

I did have some overuse injury problems and lost about six months in 2010, but think I've figured out how to train smarter as a result and minimize my injury risk.  Two of the major things have been doing a Galloway run/walk strategy on long runs and losing 20 pounds.

I also think that aging and having a sense of your own frailty and mortality makes you more appreciative of the ability to still get out and exercise strenuously.  Especially when most of your peers are couch-bound or riding around in golf carts.  I know I'm a lot less likely to skip a workout than I was 5 or 10 years ago, because I know that there will eventually come a day when I can't do this stuff.  Hopefully that day is still a long way off, but I intend to enjoy the ride while I can.

Mark

 

 

2013-02-21 11:15 AM
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Subject: RE: older folks training

I addition to the other excellent recommendations I've read here, I suggest you make sure you stretch regularly.  I'm 54 and find that if I skimp on stretching, I have a greater tendency to get injured.  I'm suggesting not only stretching before and after workouts, but have a regular routine as well.  I have a tendency to get tight hamstrings and stretch my hamstrings in both legs every morning and evening.  I'm also trying to keep up with yoga stretching a couple times a week.  When I'm limbered up, I can almost get my flat palms on the floor when bending at the waist.  This morning, after a relatively hard (for me) run yesterday and bike the day before, when I first tried to bend at the waist to touch the floor, my fingertips almost got to my knees.  After 10 minutes of slowly working the kinks out, I was able to at least touch the floor with my fingertips.

2013-08-25 1:44 PM
in reply to: nickster

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Subject: RE: older folks training
Excellent thread!! I'm 47 and just started. No races yet, but I'm anxious to get out there. (The swim freaks me out)

I'll be watching your logs for inspiration.
2013-08-25 2:22 PM
in reply to: Panther

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Subject: RE: older folks training
Originally posted by Panther

Excellent thread!! I'm 47 and just started. No races yet, but I'm anxious to get out there. (The swim freaks me out)

I'll be watching your logs for inspiration.



This is a bit of an old thread (from last Feb 20th), so I wonder how the original poster is doing...

BTW there are not very many people in triathlon who think 47 or 51 is old. There are tons of really fast 45-49 age group competitors from local sprints up to the IM championship in Kona. And there are lots of beginners like you, just starting out in their 40s and 50s. So you are in good company, and I don't think you should focus on your age. Those generic beginner plans will do you just fine.

That said, a lot of people will say that as they aged they discovered they didn't bounce back from injuries as easily as before. And they will say that they need a little more recovery time after big training weekends or a hard race day. So you'll want to keep that in mind - when the plan calls for recovery do it.

I'm 48 myself. I did my first triathlon at 38, my first ironman at 40. I'm training right now for Ironman #10 this November in Arizona.
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