General Discussion Triathlon Talk » Donating blood and training Rss Feed  
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2015-04-01 8:05 AM

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953
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Subject: Donating blood and training
I have been a blood donor for 6 or 7 years. Not much in the past 2 years (only once) due to anemia cause by womens problem. I my first tri last year without many red cells in my blood. All under control now so I went back and gave blood yesterday. Been feeling tired since, headache (and upset stomach due to the iron supplement I am taking). Should I take a day off today? Any blood donors out there? How do you train afterwards?


2015-04-01 9:07 AM
in reply to: 0

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Subject: RE: Donating blood and training
I have had similar women's issues and had to stop donating blood (doctor's orders). Even when my iron got back to "normal". "Normal" for me can quickly go to dangerously low if I donate 500mL of blood. I suspect a similar thing is happening with you.

I used to donate regularly as well and I hate that I can't, but its just not healthy for some of us.

Eta: I live in canada and one of the exclusions for donation is if you are taking an iron supplement for anemia.

Edited by jennifer_runs 2015-04-01 9:09 AM
2015-04-01 9:25 AM
in reply to: jennifer_runs

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953
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, Kronobergs lan
Subject: RE: Donating blood and training
thanks for your reply. I am not taking iron supplements normally, just for a few days after donating. I hope I will recover quickly. I would hate to have to stop.
Decided to take the day off today. The weather is too crap for an enjoyable bike ride anyway...
2015-04-01 10:52 AM
in reply to: Rollergirl

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Subject: RE: Donating blood and training

Perhaps instead of giving whole blood do Apheresis donations for platelets instead.  Until I moved many years ago I did this a lot.

2015-04-01 11:17 AM
in reply to: Donto

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953
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Subject: RE: Donating blood and training
Thanks, never heard of this around here, will check it out!
2015-04-01 6:14 PM
in reply to: Rollergirl

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Subject: RE: Donating blood and training
I can't speak to women's problems, however I tend to take it easy a day or 2 after donating. As Red blood cells (RBC's) are taken out in whole blood, your oxygen carrying capacity is reduced, thereby making endurance exercise harder. It is sort of a similar effect to going to high altiude, as there is less oxygen available.

Here in Australia you have to wait 3 months before dontating whole blood again, as this is the time it takes to fully regenerate. As a result, I do not donate whole blood within about 2 months of a priority race.

As for plasma, again, here in Aus, we can do this every 2 weeks, as it regenerates very quickly (as it is mostly fluid, and not so much cells). This would affect your blood volume and may cause some effects if you are training in a particularly hot environment (lower blood volume = higher heart rate and blood pressure required).

I have never looked specifically at my HR data pre and post donation, but it wouldn't surprise me if there were some difference there.


2015-04-02 1:35 AM
in reply to: Rollergirl

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Subject: RE: Donating blood and training
Your training will likely be compromised up to 3 weeks. Browse a few abstracts here:
https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie...

Donating blood is good, but as long as I am in training, I won't do it.
2015-04-02 6:15 AM
in reply to: dfroelich

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953
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, Kronobergs lan
Subject: RE: Donating blood and training
thanks for the input. I will try and Schedule my next donation around a week off or something. Luckily I have one month to a 10k I have entered and 2 months until the first of my 2 tris this year. I'll be fine. Feeling better already
2015-04-03 11:57 AM
in reply to: stuart_little_9

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953
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Subject: RE: Donating blood and training
Originally posted by stuart_little_9

I can't speak to women's problems, however I tend to take it easy a day or 2 after donating. As Red blood cells (RBC's) are taken out in whole blood, your oxygen carrying capacity is reduced, thereby making endurance exercise harder. It is sort of a similar effect to going to high altiude, as there is less oxygen available.

Here in Australia you have to wait 3 months before dontating whole blood again, as this is the time it takes to fully regenerate. As a result, I do not donate whole blood within about 2 months of a priority race.

As for plasma, again, here in Aus, we can do this every 2 weeks, as it regenerates very quickly (as it is mostly fluid, and not so much cells). This would affect your blood volume and may cause some effects if you are training in a particularly hot environment (lower blood volume = higher heart rate and blood pressure required).

I have never looked specifically at my HR data pre and post donation, but it wouldn't surprise me if there were some difference there.


So if it's similar to training at high altitude, then it's actually good for training?
2015-04-03 3:36 PM
in reply to: Rollergirl

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Langley, BC, 'Wet Coast' Canada
Subject: RE: Donating blood and training
Originally posted by Rollergirl

Originally posted by stuart_little_9

I can't speak to women's problems, however I tend to take it easy a day or 2 after donating. As Red blood cells (RBC's) are taken out in whole blood, your oxygen carrying capacity is reduced, thereby making endurance exercise harder. It is sort of a similar effect to going to high altiude, as there is less oxygen available.

Here in Australia you have to wait 3 months before dontating whole blood again, as this is the time it takes to fully regenerate. As a result, I do not donate whole blood within about 2 months of a priority race.

As for plasma, again, here in Aus, we can do this every 2 weeks, as it regenerates very quickly (as it is mostly fluid, and not so much cells). This would affect your blood volume and may cause some effects if you are training in a particularly hot environment (lower blood volume = higher heart rate and blood pressure required).

I have never looked specifically at my HR data pre and post donation, but it wouldn't surprise me if there were some difference there.


So if it's similar to training at high altitude, then it's actually good for training?


I may be wrong, but I believe that altitude training works by forcing the body to compensate for the lack of oxygen at higher elevations by providing the opportunity for the body to adapt by producing more red blood cells to carry the required oxygen-carrying hemoglobin needed to accomplish the work it can do at lower elevations (with the lower elevation's higher level of oxygen). This happens with full volume of blood.

Old-school blood-doping works, basically, by taking the red blood cells out of a blood donation and adding them back AFTER the body has had the chance to replace them, giving the body more than its regular number of red blood cells....

By donating, the volume of blood is reduced, and we lose those red blood cells. The body then must replace them, which takes a few weeks, I believe.
So, 'No', donating is not necessarily 'good for training' as is altitude-training. But, it is good for society

I believe there may have been some findings in the past that forcing the body to have to replace the lost blood volume , and red blood cells, was somehow healthy, but I cannot recall specifics .... My courses in exercise physiology were a loooong time ago
Someone with knowledge in that area will need to jump in with an answer.



2015-04-03 4:48 PM
in reply to: triosaurus

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953
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Subject: RE: Donating blood and training
It makes sense. I struggled today on my long ride but I feel a lot better already so I don't think I will stop giving blood for the sake of my tri "career". I'll just make sure I donate at least 4 weeks before a race. I don't race that much anyway. One 10k and 2 sprints this year. No big deal.


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