General Discussion Triathlon Talk » Wheelsets 101 Rss Feed  
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2016-04-19 7:09 AM

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Subject: Wheelsets 101
So I'm diving into the world of wheelsets, and I feel like I'm already in over my head.

Background: doing Steelhead this year, and next year my plan is to do IMOO. I completed Racine last year. I was considering upgrading to a tri-bike, but after some discussion with folks experienced with the IMOO bike course I think the better option for me is to stick with my roadie and spend the money on a good wheelset. My road bike is a Felt ZW75, clip on aerobars and fitted for an aero position. Cycling is my strongest event and I'm more of a climber so that is why I think sticking with a road bike will work best for me.

So far, I know I want a clincher wheelset, budget up to $1500 ( ) I'm female but not particularly light (145 lbs). Bike handling skills are OK, but just got rollers so plan on working on that over the next 18 months. My bike split for Racine last year was 3hr 1 min so my goal is to get under that time at Steelhead.

Other than that, I would love a bit more education and insight into wheelsets - like how often should I train with them? What are advantages/disadvantages to certain types of wheelsets vs. others?

Thanks!


2016-04-19 7:53 AM
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Subject: RE: Wheelsets 101
Originally posted by ginger1981

So I'm diving into the world of wheelsets, and I feel like I'm already in over my head.

Background: doing Steelhead this year, and next year my plan is to do IMOO. I completed Racine last year. I was considering upgrading to a tri-bike, but after some discussion with folks experienced with the IMOO bike course I think the better option for me is to stick with my roadie and spend the money on a good wheelset. My road bike is a Felt ZW75, clip on aerobars and fitted for an aero position. Cycling is my strongest event and I'm more of a climber so that is why I think sticking with a road bike will work best for me.

So far, I know I want a clincher wheelset, budget up to $1500 ( ) I'm female but not particularly light (145 lbs). Bike handling skills are OK, but just got rollers so plan on working on that over the next 18 months. My bike split for Racine last year was 3hr 1 min so my goal is to get under that time at Steelhead.

Other than that, I would love a bit more education and insight into wheelsets - like how often should I train with them? What are advantages/disadvantages to certain types of wheelsets vs. others?

Thanks!


Wheels are probably the worst bang for the buck in terms of performance benefit, especially on a hilly course. That $1500 can buy you a lot more performance.

Given it's for your road bike, I would get a Flo 30 front ($224) and Flo 30 Rim ($80) and lace it with a power tap hub. You will get a reasonably aero wheelset and power to train and race with probably for close to $1000. You can even trhow a disc cover on there. Tires and tubes are critical

In this scenario you are getting a reasonable wheelset and power to train and race with.

Just one of many possibilities.


Edited by marcag 2016-04-19 7:54 AM
2016-04-19 8:35 AM
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Subject: RE: Wheelsets 101
Originally posted by marcag

Originally posted by ginger1981

So I'm diving into the world of wheelsets, and I feel like I'm already in over my head.

Background: doing Steelhead this year, and next year my plan is to do IMOO. I completed Racine last year. I was considering upgrading to a tri-bike, but after some discussion with folks experienced with the IMOO bike course I think the better option for me is to stick with my roadie and spend the money on a good wheelset. My road bike is a Felt ZW75, clip on aerobars and fitted for an aero position. Cycling is my strongest event and I'm more of a climber so that is why I think sticking with a road bike will work best for me.

So far, I know I want a clincher wheelset, budget up to $1500 ( ) I'm female but not particularly light (145 lbs). Bike handling skills are OK, but just got rollers so plan on working on that over the next 18 months. My bike split for Racine last year was 3hr 1 min so my goal is to get under that time at Steelhead.

Other than that, I would love a bit more education and insight into wheelsets - like how often should I train with them? What are advantages/disadvantages to certain types of wheelsets vs. others?

Thanks!


Wheels are probably the worst bang for the buck in terms of performance benefit, especially on a hilly course. That $1500 can buy you a lot more performance.

Given it's for your road bike, I would get a Flo 30 front ($224) and Flo 30 Rim ($80) and lace it with a power tap hub. You will get a reasonably aero wheelset and power to train and race with probably for close to $1000. You can even trhow a disc cover on there. Tires and tubes are critical

In this scenario you are getting a reasonable wheelset and power to train and race with.

Just one of many possibilities.



^^^ Agree- Spending big $ of deep carbon wheelset will save you about 2-3 minutes in a 1/2 IM, a wheelset like the Flo 30's (30mm deep Al rims wider areo profile) will save you 1-2 minutes on that 1/2 IM. You can ride these all the time with no worries. The power meter will help you train and race smarter. Put Conti 4000s II tires on your bike, depending on what you ride now this could save you a lot of time.
Look into the aero aspects; aero helmet, clothing, cleaning up cables, position on bike.

Edited by mike761 2016-04-19 8:36 AM
2016-04-19 7:25 PM
in reply to: mike761

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Subject: RE: Wheelsets 101
I'm sure there are plenty of other areas that you could use $1500, but I'll try to answer your question without getting into that stuff. IMO I would buy a FLO carbon set. I really don't think there is a better value on the market right now. Another decent option are Boyd's, but that puts you right at you budget of 1500 for new. You could also do direct order from china if you are interested in that. I think a few people on here have had decent success with them, but i'm not positive. There are a few reputable sites that I know of, but I've only linked one at the bottom because its my favorite. If you want to get real fancy you can get a custom built set on boyd rims for about $1600 from prowheelbuilder (+ or - depending on the options you chose, but mine came in at 1600 w/ their 12% discount which seems to be common). I personally chose the wheel builder one because I wanted disc brakes for my new bike and they were within $100 of stock wheels from boyd.

When it comes to size that comes down to personal preference/ability. On a bike specific forum I've read plenty of posts about tiny girls riding deep wheels without issues, but they spend 15+ hours per week on the bike so they have skills. I personally went 60/90 from FLO until I sold them. Now I have 60/60 from boyd. You would probably enjoy the 45/45 or 45/60 combo. People here have mentioned doing something like 45/45 or 60/60 and adding a rear wheel cover, but I haven't done that yet. I recommended deeper wheels because I'm assuming even though you will be doing a lot of climbing you will also be doing a lot of descending in which case the aero advantage will help unless you are riding the brakes the whole time.

Like everyone else said don't expect a massive difference though. I got them because I love the way they look and I can afford it. If $1500 is all you can spend and speed is what you want you should probably listen to everyone else. If $1500 is what you want to spend on wheels and you just want nice wheels then go for it!

If you decide to do custom message me. I've had a lot of communication with them so I might be able to get you a discount (complete speculation, but worth a try).

http://www.flocycling.com/wheels_front_flo_60_cc.php
http://www.boydcycling.com/products/44mm-clincher-wheel-set.html
https://www.wheelsfar.com/
http://www.prowheelbuilder.com/

I'm attaching pics of mine, but they pics aren't great. I broke my camera on my phone by riding over it after it fell out of my pocket :D.





(13036363_874998304928_1241893639_o.jpg)



(13072226_874998289958_2105484654_o.jpg)



Attachments
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13036363_874998304928_1241893639_o.jpg (136KB - 2 downloads)
13072226_874998289958_2105484654_o.jpg (168KB - 2 downloads)
2016-04-19 8:20 PM
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Subject: RE: Wheelsets 101

Originally posted by marcag
Originally posted by ginger1981 So I'm diving into the world of wheelsets, and I feel like I'm already in over my head. Background: doing Steelhead this year, and next year my plan is to do IMOO. I completed Racine last year. I was considering upgrading to a tri-bike, but after some discussion with folks experienced with the IMOO bike course I think the better option for me is to stick with my roadie and spend the money on a good wheelset. My road bike is a Felt ZW75, clip on aerobars and fitted for an aero position. Cycling is my strongest event and I'm more of a climber so that is why I think sticking with a road bike will work best for me. So far, I know I want a clincher wheelset, budget up to $1500 ( ) I'm female but not particularly light (145 lbs). Bike handling skills are OK, but just got rollers so plan on working on that over the next 18 months. My bike split for Racine last year was 3hr 1 min so my goal is to get under that time at Steelhead. Other than that, I would love a bit more education and insight into wheelsets - like how often should I train with them? What are advantages/disadvantages to certain types of wheelsets vs. others? Thanks!
Wheels are probably the worst bang for the buck in terms of performance benefit, especially on a hilly course. That $1500 can buy you a lot more performance. Given it's for your road bike, I would get a Flo 30 front ($224) and Flo 30 Rim ($80) and lace it with a power tap hub. You will get a reasonably aero wheelset and power to train and race with probably for close to $1000. You can even trhow a disc cover on there. Tires and tubes are critical In this scenario you are getting a reasonable wheelset and power to train and race with. Just one of many possibilities.

Agree.  Spending money on wheels probably one of the coolest things you can do for your bike in terms of bling...but cost per second is one of the worst ways to spend your money in terms of time savings.

$500ish is not too bad to spend on a decent set of aero wheels (FLO30 or used other), but you can probably get just as good if not more benefit for less money by focusing on tires, tubes, clothing, and helmet choice.

Or you could spend the money on a tri bike assuming your aerodynamic fit will improve by a significant margin.  One would guess the answer is yes...but it really depends on where you are now with your road bike and clip ons, to where you might possibly go with a fit on a tri bike.

If your mind is still made up on buying wheels, I do agree that clinchers are preferred these days.  The next decision you want to make is carbon or aluminum braking surface.  I'd probably go with aluminum...such FLO, HED, or older Zipps.  I'd also shoot for around 50-60 mm deep as a safe bet.



Edited by Jason N 2016-04-19 8:22 PM
2016-04-19 11:18 PM
in reply to: Jason N

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Subject: RE: Wheelsets 101
Thanks all who replied!

I'm not sold on spending the cash on a wheelset - a few people I talked to so far recommended a road bike for IMOO but I'm open to suggestions. I've done the loop of the course and it's pretty hilly. My experience at Racine was I was passing by tri bikes on the climbs but then the tri bikes caught up with me on the flats. Racine didn't seem quite as crazy with the hills but then again I think I was distracted by road conditions more than hills on that course.

For other gear - I have a few tri-suits, I have a Giro Atmos helmet that is a couple years old - I don't think it's the most aero helmet but I do like it for it's ventilation. I don't own a power meter but I've been taking computrainer classes - I'm not sure how accurate their wattage estimate is though.



2016-04-20 5:27 AM
in reply to: ginger1981

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Subject: RE: Wheelsets 101
Originally posted by ginger1981

Thanks all who replied!

I'm not sold on spending the cash on a wheelset - a few people I talked to so far recommended a road bike for IMOO but I'm open to suggestions. I've done the loop of the course and it's pretty hilly. My experience at Racine was I was passing by tri bikes on the climbs but then the tri bikes caught up with me on the flats. Racine didn't seem quite as crazy with the hills but then again I think I was distracted by road conditions more than hills on that course.

For other gear - I have a few tri-suits, I have a Giro Atmos helmet that is a couple years old - I don't think it's the most aero helmet but I do like it for it's ventilation. I don't own a power meter but I've been taking computrainer classes - I'm not sure how accurate their wattage estimate is though.




Allocation of budget to get the most bang for the buck can be quite a debate.
I know where I get the most bang for the buck but I am a poor example of limiting my expenses :-)

2016-04-20 7:03 AM
in reply to: ginger1981

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Subject: RE: Wheelsets 101
Originally posted by ginger1981

Thanks all who replied!

I'm not sold on spending the cash on a wheelset - a few people I talked to so far recommended a road bike for IMOO but I'm open to suggestions. I've done the loop of the course and it's pretty hilly. My experience at Racine was I was passing by tri bikes on the climbs but then the tri bikes caught up with me on the flats. Racine didn't seem quite as crazy with the hills but then again I think I was distracted by road conditions more than hills on that course.

For other gear - I have a few tri-suits, I have a Giro Atmos helmet that is a couple years old - I don't think it's the most aero helmet but I do like it for it's ventilation. I don't own a power meter but I've been taking computrainer classes - I'm not sure how accurate their wattage estimate is though.




Sounds like you are interested in performance not bling. So what kind of wheels are you on now? box rims 32 spoke? what tire do you ride?

Personally I don't understand the tri bikes going up hill slow, I climb on my tri bike just as faster or faster than my road bike. I can do technical descents faster on my road bike though. ( atypical 50 mile ride for me has 3500 to 6000 ft of climbing)
2016-04-20 7:37 AM
in reply to: mike761

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Subject: RE: Wheelsets 101

Originally posted by mike761
Originally posted by ginger1981 Thanks all who replied! I'm not sold on spending the cash on a wheelset - a few people I talked to so far recommended a road bike for IMOO but I'm open to suggestions. I've done the loop of the course and it's pretty hilly. My experience at Racine was I was passing by tri bikes on the climbs but then the tri bikes caught up with me on the flats. Racine didn't seem quite as crazy with the hills but then again I think I was distracted by road conditions more than hills on that course. For other gear - I have a few tri-suits, I have a Giro Atmos helmet that is a couple years old - I don't think it's the most aero helmet but I do like it for it's ventilation. I don't own a power meter but I've been taking computrainer classes - I'm not sure how accurate their wattage estimate is though.
Sounds like you are interested in performance not bling. So what kind of wheels are you on now? box rims 32 spoke? what tire do you ride? Personally I don't understand the tri bikes going up hill slow, I climb on my tri bike just as faster or faster than my road bike. I can do technical descents faster on my road bike though. ( atypical 50 mile ride for me has 3500 to 6000 ft of climbing)

I'm faster going up on the tri bike too. I'm not sure the tri bike being "slow" uphill is really the case so much as it's people are going faster off the hills due to the aero advantage.

Racine is a much flatter course than IMWI is. The IM course is generally regarded as being rather challenging due to the number of hills on it even though they aren't necessarily long sustained climbs. The total ascending does get up there. That said, when asked about road vs tri bike on this course it's still heavily in favor of the tri bike. In this case, that part is made a little more tricky in determining the value by getting a tri bike, as was mentioned earlier.

2016-04-20 7:38 AM
in reply to: mike761

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Subject: RE: Wheelsets 101
Originally posted by mike761

Originally posted by ginger1981

Thanks all who replied!

I'm not sold on spending the cash on a wheelset - a few people I talked to so far recommended a road bike for IMOO but I'm open to suggestions. I've done the loop of the course and it's pretty hilly. My experience at Racine was I was passing by tri bikes on the climbs but then the tri bikes caught up with me on the flats. Racine didn't seem quite as crazy with the hills but then again I think I was distracted by road conditions more than hills on that course.

For other gear - I have a few tri-suits, I have a Giro Atmos helmet that is a couple years old - I don't think it's the most aero helmet but I do like it for it's ventilation. I don't own a power meter but I've been taking computrainer classes - I'm not sure how accurate their wattage estimate is though.




Sounds like you are interested in performance not bling. So what kind of wheels are you on now? box rims 32 spoke? what tire do you ride?

Personally I don't understand the tri bikes going up hill slow, I climb on my tri bike just as faster or faster than my road bike. I can do technical descents faster on my road bike though. ( atypical 50 mile ride for me has 3500 to 6000 ft of climbing)


I think some people don't realize they have different gearing on their road and tri bikes (cassette and crank size). Some don't like to have to shift from the aerobars when on the horns when climbing.

Maybe some people's position on their tri bike isn't optmized

Like you, I can climb as fast on my tri bike as well as my road bike. The only time I would consider using a road bike is in a race with lots of turns on the downhills and no flats or rolling hills at all. IF i had both bikes.

The OP would need to figure out how much time she could save on a tri bike and if the $ is worth the minutes.
2016-04-20 8:08 AM
in reply to: ginger1981

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Subject: RE: Wheelsets 101
Just my .02..........

I just "wanted" wheels. So, I bought them. I bought a used (the front had 300 mi. - the rear was brand new) set of FLO (60/90) for $675 - shipped (from 'the other site'). I also bought a wheelbuilder aero jacket for the rear 90. I pretty much ride them all the time (for what I have in them).

Good luck.


2016-04-20 10:17 AM
in reply to: nc452010

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Subject: RE: Wheelsets 101

Like nc I just wanted some "race" wheels.  I was riding on my old Felt TTR2 40mm wheels and with a disc cover when racing.  Nothing wrong with them, just older wheel design that didn't match well with wider / lower Crr  tires.  I too bought a used FLO 60/90 wheelset for $650 via eBay.  Now that FLO has come out and started selling their new carbon clinchers & AL/carbon fairing clinchers I'm sure there are older generation AL/carbon fairing clinchers popping up here and there for those that are "upgrading".  Keep looking around on the BT, ST classifieds and eBay.

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