General Discussion Triathlon Talk » Six degrees of separation Rss Feed  
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2016-05-12 7:53 PM

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Subject: Six degrees of separation
I still find myself working triathlon or the fact that I am a triathlete into totally unrelated conversations. It's kind of funny (and pathetic) how I look for the slightest opening to broach the topic. Reminded me of the thread title. Sometimes it's super easy like when someone asks how your weekend was. Other times it takes a little more effort. I do tread lightly and go to some lengths not to sound like a jerk. Anyone else shamelessly manipulate a conversation to put it out there and if so what was the biggest leap? Example (not actual) "Oh, I'm so sorry your dear old dog had to be put down. Yeah I'm really close with my dog. I take him running with me, you know, when I'm training for triathlons.".


2016-05-12 8:49 PM
in reply to: CBess

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation

Why?

2016-05-12 11:03 PM
in reply to: CBess

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation

I never actively look for opportunities to do that - but it often tends to just happen. Or rather, what I actively look to do is generally to try NOT to mention triathlon in conversations. It goes like *somebody says something that would be a great segue into triathlon* -> *I tell myself "do not bring triathlon up, do not bring triathlon up, do not bring triathlon up"* -> *I miss half of what the other person was telling me and say "Sorry, you were saying?".

2016-05-12 11:28 PM
in reply to: MikaelEriksson

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation
Same here--I try NOT to, unless the person I'm talking to happens to be into triathlons or other endurance sports. Not sure why, I just don't like tooting my own horn, I guess. I have a lot of colleagues at work who are pretty into fitness and sports, albeit at more moderate, recreational levels, and I don't want them to feel like I'm belittling their efforts, or that one has to do the hours of training I do to be fit. I'm doing it to kick butt, not to look good or for general fitness.

It helps that I apparently don't "look like" an athlete. People who don't know me well usually have no idea. I remember once we were playing a "getting to know you" game at a conference and you had to write one interesting fact about yourself. We got a list of those facts and tried to match them to names in a mixer-type game. I wrote, "I have competed in the marathon at Olympic Trials and World University Games" and NO ONE guessed that. I did get asked questions like, "Did you work as a model in Europe?" (Er...too short and ordinary.) "Do you own your own catering business?" (No one would pay to eat my cooking!) and "Are you a mother of triplets?" (??!!) but never about my marathoning past.
2016-05-13 7:30 AM
in reply to: CBess

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation
My wife has a game... when we go out to eat she times how long it takes me to turn the conversation back to triathlon and my training
2016-05-13 7:41 AM
in reply to: #5181491


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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation
Hot Runners first paragraph above sums up my position perfectly.


2016-05-13 7:46 AM
in reply to: CBess

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation
It comes up from time to time. But I do my best to keep it at a minimum. The folks that I do talk to it about are fairly close to me so I don't mind bringing it up to them.
2016-05-13 7:48 AM
in reply to: PBT_2009

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation
First year or two I'd talk about it from time to time. Now I try to avoid it at all costs unless I'm talking to someone actively training. It makes me uncomfortable when family and friends bring it up to strangers
2016-05-13 8:58 AM
in reply to: CBess

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation
2016-05-13 9:06 AM
in reply to: #5181533

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation
Don't worry, you'll grow out of it soon.
2016-05-13 9:18 AM
in reply to: CBess

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation

Originally posted by CBess I still find myself working triathlon or the fact that I am a triathlete into totally unrelated conversations. It's kind of funny (and pathetic) how I look for the slightest opening to broach the topic. Reminded me of the thread title. Sometimes it's super easy like when someone asks how your weekend was. Other times it takes a little more effort. I do tread lightly and go to some lengths not to sound like a jerk. Anyone else shamelessly manipulate a conversation to put it out there and if so what was the biggest leap? Example (not actual) "Oh, I'm so sorry your dear old dog had to be put down. Yeah I'm really close with my dog. I take him running with me, you know, when I'm training for triathlons.".

I hope that you wouldn't seriously turn such a conversation into one about you.  That would be a jerk move, as well as very pathetic.



2016-05-13 9:38 AM
in reply to: CBess

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation
I only bring up my training if I'm asked specifically about it (usually by my darling mother) or if I have an actual story to tell (which so far has only been a fairly spectacular bruise that my coworkers were treated to.) Other than that, most of my friends are into other stuff, so I wouldn't want to bore them with triathlon. And when I'm at work, I'm....working.
2016-05-13 10:07 AM
in reply to: CBess

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation
I get uncomfortable talking about triathlons with people who aren't into some kind of endurance sport. When someone finds out that I do triathlons, they always say the same things:
"I don't run unless I am chased"
"Why would you do something like that? It sounds awful."
"You should try walking. I walk a mile every day."

I learned a long time ago that I hate those conversations. However, if you get me around people who are into similar activities, I can talk forever.
2016-05-13 12:44 PM
in reply to: LundyLund

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation
Originally posted by LundyLund

Is this about you?Appropriate




This is so very true, in many situations.
I get so annoyed at people that can only talk about training that I usually refuse to do so, even when asked. If I am asked how my training is going I usually just answer, "good" and move on.

The first rule of triathlon: "YOU MUST ALWAYS TALK ABOUT TRIATHLON"
2016-05-13 1:27 PM
in reply to: pwoolson

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation

Originally posted by pwoolson
Originally posted by LundyLund

Is this about you?Appropriate

This is so very true, in many situations. I get so annoyed at people that can only talk about training that I usually refuse to do so, even when asked. If I am asked how my training is going I usually just answer, "good" and move on. The first rule of triathlon: "YOU MUST ALWAYS TALK ABOUT TRIATHLON"

I agree, but on a more macro level. I don't like talking to anyone who really only talks about one thing. By way of example, when I was in law school, I hated hanging out with certain law students, because all they would talk about was law school. Hell, even my wife said she didn't like hanging out with them, because that's all they talked about. Triathlon discussion can be just as bad, and to an outsider, might be even worse because there's almost a hint of superiority - "oh, you went to the movies this weekend? Well, I biked 50 miles and run 15."

Don't be that guy/girl.

2016-05-13 1:34 PM
in reply to: LundyLund

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation

Originally posted by LundyLund

Originally posted by pwoolson
Originally posted by LundyLund

Is this about you?Appropriate

This is so very true, in many situations. I get so annoyed at people that can only talk about training that I usually refuse to do so, even when asked. If I am asked how my training is going I usually just answer, "good" and move on. The first rule of triathlon: "YOU MUST ALWAYS TALK ABOUT TRIATHLON"

I agree, but on a more macro level. I don't like talking to anyone who really only talks about one thing. By way of example, when I was in law school, I hated hanging out with certain law students, because all they would talk about was law school. Hell, even my wife said she didn't like hanging out with them, because that's all they talked about. Triathlon discussion can be just as bad, and to an outsider, might be even worse because there's almost a hint of superiority - "oh, you went to the movies this weekend? Well, I biked 50 miles and run 15."

Don't be that guy/girl.

The movie person holds the high ground there in many ways.



2016-05-18 2:50 PM
in reply to: 0

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation
I try not to as much as possible. It ends up coming up though, because it's a big part of "what I did this weekend". It's either that or stuff with my kids. I tend to talk more about the latter, but people know that I do tris and they inevitably ask about it. It makes me uncomfortable how people talk about it, like you landed on the moon or something....you just swim bike and run a lot and you get faster. It's really not that big of a deal.

ETA: there is another engineer in another office that is in my AG and unbelievably close in ability (our USAT scores from last year were within .01 of each other) so whenever we have to talk about something for work, the first 20 minutes of the conversation are about training...then we discuss the work stuff for a minute or two.

Edited by 3mar 2016-05-18 2:52 PM
2016-05-18 4:46 PM
in reply to: 3mar

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation

The fact that we are regulars on the BT forum is a clear indication that we like talking about Triathlon with others.  It however is a very specific and the topics that we share and the lingo that we use is intimidating for people new to the sport and goes completely over the head of people who don't participate in triathlon.  

I am an Engineer and as much as I would like to talk about the day at the office with friend and family I have to filter what I say or else they get lost in what I am saying and feel like I am being self centered by talking about topics that only I can enjoy.  I also breed exhibition poultry and would like to talk to talk poultry genetics, etc with people but that likewise comes across as self centered and they really don't enjoy the conversation.  The same goes for about anything that you study in depth and are an expert on.  You need to discuss them with other expert and stick to common interests/topics with everyone else or else you become socially awkward and unable to communicate effectually with others.

Professor Higgin's advise was to stick to the weather and everyone's health.  

Eisenstein said  that you don't really understand something unless you can explain it in terms that your mother would understand (think of Eistien's Mother and the topics he might have been thinking about and wanting to share with his family and friend).

I do talk about Triathlon with others.  When I left town for a week everyone at work knew that I was spending my vacation to do an Ironman and many asked how I did when I got back.  I told them how I did in a short quick versions of the race that even my mother would understand.  I had a new neighbor that moved in while I was out of town come over to meet us on Saturday and the first thing they asked is if we were runners.  They are very active runners and I guess the word got out that I am the cazy runner seen going as many as 14 miles at a time through the neighborhood streets between 5-7am in the morning. They saw I was wearing an Ironman hat and were excited.  They don't do Triathlon by did ask about it and it was fun to tell them why I switch to Triathlon after 30 years of running.  I still kept it short and simple.  I also am reminded that I have two ears and one mouth and that I should do twice as much listening as I am talking.  You can't do that if you are having a one side conversation about triathlon with someone that doesn't participate in the sport.

   

2016-05-18 5:47 PM
in reply to: CBess

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation
Not quite the same but hilarious nonetheless.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V68SMFrpFt8
2016-05-18 11:43 PM
in reply to: CBess

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Subject: RE: Six degrees of separation

This is reeeally recommended watching:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B03dFMG8nR4 

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