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2016-07-14 10:39 AM
in reply to: NXS

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Subject: RE: bah!
Sorry but all that college talk was triggering for me.


2016-07-14 10:57 AM
in reply to: dmiller5

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Subject: RE: bah!
Originally posted by dmiller5

Originally posted by Rogillio No, a real engineer call a wannabe on being an real engineer.

umm what?




No more on this one? Come on...I went got my popcorn and everything...
2016-07-14 11:00 AM
in reply to: 3mar

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Subject: RE: bah!

Originally posted by 3mar
Originally posted by dmiller5

Originally posted by Rogillio No, a real engineer call a wannabe on being an real engineer.

umm what?

No more on this one? Come on...I went got my popcorn and everything...

You just want to see if we can get the thread talking about another thread locked too.  
It's like thread inception

2016-07-14 11:29 AM
in reply to: tuwood

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Subject: RE: bah!

Originally posted by tuwood

Originally posted by 3mar
Originally posted by dmiller5

Originally posted by Rogillio No, a real engineer call a wannabe on being an real engineer.

umm what?

No more on this one? Come on...I went got my popcorn and everything...

You just want to see if we can get the thread talking about another thread locked too.  
It's like thread inception

 

 

Egggzactly!  I would start talking about how I was more likely to hire C-student engineers who actually worked in college than a B-student who didn't work and had to use every ounce of their intellect just to make B's.  Then someone would get all huffy and call me stupid and ignorant...then I'd tell him he was being childish....and to put his necktie back on because the foreskin had come up over his ears....and the next thing your know we'd be talking thermodynamics and the significance of the triple point of water......YANK!

 

2016-07-14 11:31 AM
in reply to: tuwood

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Subject: RE: bah!

Originally posted by tuwood

Originally posted by 3mar
Originally posted by dmiller5

Originally posted by Rogillio No, a real engineer call a wannabe on being an real engineer.

umm what?

No more on this one? Come on...I went got my popcorn and everything...

You just want to see if we can get the thread talking about another thread locked too.  
It's like thread inception

 

 

Egggzactly!  I would start talking about how I was more likely to hire C-student engineers who actually worked in college than a B-student who didn't work and had to use every ounce of their intellect just to make B's.  Then someone would get all huffy and call me stupid and ignorant...then I'd tell him he was being childish....and to put his necktie back on because the foreskin had come up over his ears....and the next thing your know we'd be talking thermodynamics and the significance of the triple point of water......YANK!

 

2016-07-14 12:17 PM
in reply to: Rogillio

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Subject: RE: bah!
Originally posted by Rogillio

Egggzactly!  I would start talking about how I was more likely to hire C-student engineers who actually worked in college than a B-student who didn't work and had to use every ounce of their intellect just to make B's. 




Except not what employers looked when I graduated and trying to get that first job out of college. started with what is your GPA. Oh we are only looking at 3.5 and above. Thank you. Later it turned into 3.75 GPA and above.

Trouble with that is never takes into account some schools programs are tough and some are easy. I was a comp sci major my program was pretty tough and time consuming (you needed a 3.0 + just to get into the program) while I met a guy who went to my old college that in his time there only wrote 1 computer program (There is a reason when I switched majors I switched schools). This was in 2003 so its not like we were doing things on punch cards or something else that is hugely time consuming.

Is that enough for a banning for you.


2016-07-14 12:45 PM
in reply to: chirunner134

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Subject: RE: bah!

Originally posted by chirunner134
Originally posted by Rogillio

Egggzactly!  I would start talking about how I was more likely to hire C-student engineers who actually worked in college than a B-student who didn't work and had to use every ounce of their intellect just to make B's. 

Except not what employers looked when I graduated and trying to get that first job out of college. started with what is your GPA. Oh we are only looking at 3.5 and above. Thank you. Later it turned into 3.75 GPA and above. Trouble with that is never takes into account some schools programs are tough and some are easy. I was a comp sci major my program was pretty tough and time consuming (you needed a 3.0 + just to get into the program) while I met a guy who went to my old college that in his time there only wrote 1 computer program (There is a reason when I switched majors I switched schools). This was in 2003 so its not like we were doing things on punch cards or something else that is hugely time consuming. Is that enough for a banning for you.

 

I've hired a lot of engineers in my career and grade point average was never high on my list.  The most important skill an engineer can possess is the ability to communicate - both oral and written communication. You might solve string theory but it you cannot communicate it, you are worthless. You also need to be able to function in a team environment and you need to have initiative.

When I graduated college 30 years ago there were only a few companies that had GPA requirements - one was HP and one was Motorola. But these places were looking for brainiacs to do board-level detailed circuit design....very specific (geeky) work. A buddy of mine interviewed with Motorola and the interviewer handed him a piece of paper and asked him to write down Maxwell's equations. My buddy did the best he could but had the sign wrong on one of the variables and the interviewer went off on him about that. I told him if they asked me to do that in an interview, I'd laugh and walk out!

Anyway, lots of things more important than GPA. I had two engineers that'd I'd hired working in a simulation lab on computers testing a system. Testing tend to be cyclical.... feast or famine...balls to the wall or dead as a doornail. During one of these down times my c-student, on his own initiative, wrote some scripts to expedite archiving the test data. My A-student just sat around surfing the internet waiting for my direction. The C-student is still with the company. The A-student is not.

2016-07-14 1:02 PM
in reply to: Rogillio

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Subject: RE: bah!

It's always good to hear that GPA is not important.  It validates my life.

2016-07-14 1:25 PM
in reply to: Left Brain

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Originally posted by Left Brain

It's always good to hear that GPA is not important.  It validates my life.

Often times GPA is a function of affluence. If you could afford to join a frat you'd have access to their resources which often included old tests given by various professors. I was a GDI and actually had to learn the material not memorize the answers from previous tests. But it you did this too much, it might come back and bite you. At my university all engineering students had to take and pass the EIT before they got your degree. So you might have a high GPA but still not pass the EIT exam. My son just graduated with a BSEE but did not have to take the EIT. IDK if is no longer required or just not required at the University of Alabama.

 

2016-07-14 1:52 PM
in reply to: Rogillio

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Subject: RE: bah!

Originally posted by Rogillio

Originally posted by Left Brain

It's always good to hear that GPA is not important.  It validates my life.

Often times GPA is a function of affluence. If you could afford to join a frat you'd have access to their resources which often included old tests given by various professors. I was a GDI and actually had to learn the material not memorize the answers from previous tests. But it you did this too much, it might come back and bite you. At my university all engineering students had to take and pass the EIT before they got your degree. So you might have a high GPA but still not pass the EIT exam. My son just graduated with a BSEE but did not have to take the EIT. IDK if is no longer required or just not required at the University of Alabama.

 

GPA, CDI, EIT, BSEE, IDK..................................it's all too much.....IDGAF!!

2016-07-14 2:00 PM
in reply to: Rogillio

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Subject: RE: bah!
Originally posted by Rogillio

Often times GPA is a function of affluence. If you could afford to join a frat you'd have access to their resources which often included old tests given by various professors.



Also another reason going to a 4 year universality as a freshman. You get a chance to build up contact in your major. I know when I went to get my comps for my master's one guy never took class that was going to be tested but he had the answers from previous years questions. He was just trying to memorize what to right rather than how to get the answer. If I made friends with him I too might not had to study for months

I am glad some people value a person's whole history. Like I said before I not seen that in my case.



2016-07-14 2:09 PM
in reply to: chirunner134

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Subject: RE: bah!

Originally posted by chirunner134
Originally posted by Rogillio

Often times GPA is a function of affluence. If you could afford to join a frat you'd have access to their resources which often included old tests given by various professors.

Also another reason going to a 4 year universality as a freshman. You get a chance to build up contact in your major. I know when I went to get my comps for my master's one guy never took class that was going to be tested but he had the answers from previous years questions. He was just trying to memorize what to right rather than how to get the answer. If I made friends with him I too might not had to study for months I am glad some people value a person's whole history. Like I said before I not seen that in my case.

Of course they take into account your whole history.  However, I'd rate your grades and field specific internships far higher than your job as a waiter right?  A student who has good grades, internships, and other activities rates higher than the student that had barely passing grades and a job as a waiter in my book.

2016-07-14 2:36 PM
in reply to: dmiller5

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Subject: RE: bah!

Originally posted by dmiller5

Originally posted by chirunner134
Originally posted by Rogillio

Often times GPA is a function of affluence. If you could afford to join a frat you'd have access to their resources which often included old tests given by various professors.

Also another reason going to a 4 year universality as a freshman. You get a chance to build up contact in your major. I know when I went to get my comps for my master's one guy never took class that was going to be tested but he had the answers from previous years questions. He was just trying to memorize what to right rather than how to get the answer. If I made friends with him I too might not had to study for months I am glad some people value a person's whole history. Like I said before I not seen that in my case.

Of course they take into account your whole history.  However, I'd rate your grades and field specific internships far higher than your job as a waiter right?  A student who has good grades, internships, and other activities rates higher than the student that had barely passing grades and a job as a waiter in my book.

 

Certainly grades are a factor.....but only for your first job. After that, your experience trumps everything. I had professor that said he used to have people wanting to use him a reference on resumes. He said he would tell employers that they are 'trainable'. He said you don't learn enough in school to actually DO any engineering! You learn fundamentals and you learn basic problem-solving techniques and critical thinking. He said if someone graduates from an ABET accredited school with a BSEE they are trainable....they can be taught.

One of my early engineering tasks was to design a metabolic simulator for testing the atmosphere control system inside the US Lab module of the International Space Station. There was no class in college that teaches you how to design a metabolic simulator. I had to design something to simulate 8 humans breathing (variable respiratory quotient to vary the O2/CO2 exchange rates), heating, sweating and off-gassing in a closed-loop environment. It was a very difficult design but I had to learn as I went. I understood basic chemistry, electricity, electronics and computer controls but I learned at I went. And that experience will forever trump the C's I made in college.

2016-07-14 2:43 PM
in reply to: Rogillio

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Subject: RE: bah!

Originally posted by Rogillio

Originally posted by dmiller5

Originally posted by chirunner134
Originally posted by Rogillio

Often times GPA is a function of affluence. If you could afford to join a frat you'd have access to their resources which often included old tests given by various professors.

Also another reason going to a 4 year universality as a freshman. You get a chance to build up contact in your major. I know when I went to get my comps for my master's one guy never took class that was going to be tested but he had the answers from previous years questions. He was just trying to memorize what to right rather than how to get the answer. If I made friends with him I too might not had to study for months I am glad some people value a person's whole history. Like I said before I not seen that in my case.

Of course they take into account your whole history.  However, I'd rate your grades and field specific internships far higher than your job as a waiter right?  A student who has good grades, internships, and other activities rates higher than the student that had barely passing grades and a job as a waiter in my book.

 

Certainly grades are a factor.....but only for your first job. After that, your experience trumps everything. I had professor that said he used to have people wanting to use him a reference on resumes. He said he would tell employers that they are 'trainable'. He said you don't learn enough in school to actually DO any engineering! You learn fundamentals and you learn basic problem-solving techniques and critical thinking. He said if someone graduates from an ABET accredited school with a BSEE they are trainable....they can be taught.

One of my early engineering tasks was to design a metabolic simulator for testing the atmosphere control system inside the US Lab module of the International Space Station. There was no class in college that teaches you how to design a metabolic simulator. I had to design something to simulate 8 humans breathing (variable respiratory quotient to vary the O2/CO2 exchange rates), heating, sweating and off-gassing in a closed-loop environment. It was a very difficult design but I had to learn as I went. I understood basic chemistry, electricity, electronics and computer controls but I learned at I went. And that experience will forever trump the C's I made in college.

oh 100%, after you get a job no one gives a crap about your grades.  but we were talking about college grads, and for them you do.

2016-07-14 2:53 PM
in reply to: Rogillio

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Subject: RE: bah!
Originally posted by Rogillio

Originally posted by dmiller5

Originally posted by chirunner134
Originally posted by Rogillio

Often times GPA is a function of affluence. If you could afford to join a frat you'd have access to their resources which often included old tests given by various professors.

Also another reason going to a 4 year universality as a freshman. You get a chance to build up contact in your major. I know when I went to get my comps for my master's one guy never took class that was going to be tested but he had the answers from previous years questions. He was just trying to memorize what to right rather than how to get the answer. If I made friends with him I too might not had to study for months I am glad some people value a person's whole history. Like I said before I not seen that in my case.

Of course they take into account your whole history.  However, I'd rate your grades and field specific internships far higher than your job as a waiter right?  A student who has good grades, internships, and other activities rates higher than the student that had barely passing grades and a job as a waiter in my book.

 

Certainly grades are a factor.....but only for your first job. After that, your experience trumps everything. I had professor that said he used to have people wanting to use him a reference on resumes. He said he would tell employers that they are 'trainable'. He said you don't learn enough in school to actually DO any engineering! You learn fundamentals and you learn basic problem-solving techniques and critical thinking. He said if someone graduates from an ABET accredited school with a BSEE they are trainable....they can be taught.

One of my early engineering tasks was to design a metabolic simulator for testing the atmosphere control system inside the US Lab module of the International Space Station. There was no class in college that teaches you how to design a metabolic simulator. I had to design something to simulate 8 humans breathing (variable respiratory quotient to vary the O2/CO2 exchange rates), heating, sweating and off-gassing in a closed-loop environment. It was a very difficult design but I had to learn as I went. I understood basic chemistry, electricity, electronics and computer controls but I learned at I went. And that experience will forever trump the C's I made in college.




Zactly.

Dave, I don't think anyone is trying to take away what you've accomplished and how you got there. Mostly just some good natured roughing up around the edges is all that's happening here. An employer needs to see and wants to see that you're capable of busting your hump to get where you need to be. Some applicants display that drive with good/average grades and an employment history that was accumulated while going to school. Some will display that drive by working their butt off in HS and getting a full ride on academic merit alone. But they want to see that you are capable of putting in the hours to get what THEY need from the prospective employee. They really want to see that you aren't afraid to work and are capable of getting along with others; having a decent string of full and part time jobs, regardless of how menial, tells them that you are.
2016-07-14 5:33 PM
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Subject: RE: bah!

Well I can say USNA crushed my days of high GPA.  Trying to squeeze a 5 year engineering degree into 4 years.  And then all the other military stuff ate up at least as much time as a job.

You also had several mandatory non-engineering classes that could be large time-sucks (*cough* celestial navigation).  Except for a few folks who had prior college experience, I think most engineering grads there were ecstatic about a 2.5 GPA.

 

Edit: oh yeah a good story about one of my friends there.  He dreamed of flying for the Marine Corps.  And he's pretty much what you'd expect of someone with that goal.  But ... he was also an aerospace engineering major.

When the seniors are getting close to graduation, there is service selection day.  Basically pick your upcoming job in the service.  There will be X number of spots open for each thing (Navy pilot, surface warfare, submarines, Marine Corps, etc).  The order of who picks first is based on a combo of your GPA and military performance.

He had the typical ~2.5 GPA of an engineer. And I think there were maybe 5 Marine Corps air billets that year (for his graduating class of ~1200).  So he's waiting and watching as 1 goes, then 2... 3, 4.  And they're only through about 200 people.  He's pacing the line, asking people "are you going MC air?  you better not be going MC air.  (glare)"  haha.  That last slot went down to 800+ and he got it.  We threw him a huge party.



Edited by spudone 2016-07-14 5:40 PM


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