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2016-07-20 9:53 AM

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Subject: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
First post here, and I appreciate any help and guidance!

In short, I got bit by the bug.

Went to support two friends racing in Ironman Syracuse (70.3) and simply got an internal challenge of if I can do this, wanting to push myself to do more and to overcome that challenge. Similarly to me running a marathon, never thought about doing it before - supported my gf doing her 5th and was like I can do that....trained up and ran two sub 3:45's in 2 weeks on hilly courses (Bmore and Raleigh).

My plan is to do the Eagleman 70.3 next June, and am doing a local sprint in Sept. Slowly and surely build from the sprint and most likely follow a structure training plan once I learn more about them.

I have a decent base for biking* and running, but need the most work in swimming, a lot. Literally did my first swim workout this monday - didn't drown, so that is a start.*= currently have a Trek Crossrip Elite (cyclocross), question to come later.

Swimming. I have a problem with managing my breath, recently watched a bunch of videos trying to get the technique down and will try and apply that to todays swim workout and see. I seem to gas myself out way before anything else, no body fatigue just lungs burning and gasping. Not fully understanding or doing correctly the exhale - mine is a combo of slow exhale with holding my breath , which I read/watched is a big no-no. Alongside not having great technique on grabbing air efficiently when I come above water - work in progress as well. Which leads me to my next needed help, how to better pace and slow myself down to stay working in the water without gasing out. From a lifetime of messing around swimming and not actually swimming for sport, I tend to just want to go balls to the wall with my strokes. Any vids or input would be awesome!

My bike. As stated above I have a Trek Crossrip Elite which is a cyclocross bike (assuming I can't post links yet, with it being my firs post).. I typically use it for bumming around the city, and have taken it out on a few longer rides (long for me) - 20 miles. Is this a bike that would suffice for the time being for a sprint, or would it be worth my effort to invest in an e try level road bike to start training on. Suggestions?

My goals for this first sprint is to 1) just complete it smoothly - no stopping mid swim/etc, and 2) try and win the Clydesdale (Men 210lbs+).

Stats: 6'3, ~205lb, primarily a weight lifting, ran 2 marathons, backpacker.

I truly appreciate if you read this. Trying to read and gain as much knowledge as possible and apply that to my training. So, any input from here would be a greatly appreciate added bonus. Thanks!


Jordan



2016-07-20 10:16 AM
in reply to: jmhall0123


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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
Originally posted by jmhall0123

Swimming.


As always...a preface...After 4 years I'm a newb....always will be.

Two things on swimming
-I think it's the discipline you can see the most relative improvement on the fastest. Unless you were on a swim team, you likely never 'worked' on swimming beyond splashing around in the pool. You can see massive improvement gains (not even so much "speed", but consistency of getting in....firing up the engine, and swimming until you're done....as opposed to rolling over and floating every 25 yards). That can happen in weeks.
-Breathing....I hear ya. That was my issue (still is, if the water's cold)....videos are a good start. My thing was I never got how important it was to breathe out when my face was in the water. I just sorta let the air dribble out, as opposed to purposefully getting it out.


My bike.


I don't know much about cyclocross bikes and such. Others will have better input...like maybe switching out tires ands stuff. But, you can do a sprint on just about anything if the rules allow (generally fixies are out). And very possibly 'win' a Clydesdale division (depending on who else is there and the course) even on a mountain bike. Heck, people complete 70.3s on hybrids. It wouldn't be fun, and there aren't many...but it's entirely doable. Not likely to win any awards.


Welcome to the madness.
2016-07-20 10:36 AM
in reply to: jmhall0123

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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
With regard to swimming, I had great success in taking group lessons at the local rec center. The price was quite reasonable, and, as most group classes of this type, there was a fair amount of attrition. What started as a class of 8 became 5 within a few weeks, so I got plenty of individualized attention.
I can't really say much about cycling, as the bike is my weak spot. However, I will say that Eagleman is a very flat course, so be prepared for wind. It also has pretty much nothing in the way of shade, so for both the bike and the run exposure/heat/humidity is a big player. The Eagleman course is known for having lots of people walking the full run leg. Many have overcooked the bike leg (biked too hard) and then aren't acclimated to the heat.
Enjoy your training!
2016-07-20 10:41 AM
in reply to: jmhall0123

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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
On swimming......

I can comment on swimming, because I was not-so-long-ago a complete beginner. I mean I couldn't swim 200yds w/out stopping. Answer me this......how much are you swimming, right now (volume and frequency)? If it isn't 4x+/wk and 1,500yds/per......you need to swim more.

About racing as a clyde...........are you serious you're going to GAIN weight - just to race in that category?
2016-07-20 11:08 AM
in reply to: jhaack39

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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
Originally posted by jhaack39

As always...a preface...After 4 years I'm a newb....always will be.

Two things on swimming
-I think it's the discipline you can see the most relative improvement on the fastest. Unless you were on a swim team, you likely never 'worked' on swimming beyond splashing around in the pool. You can see massive improvement gains (not even so much "speed", but consistency of getting in....firing up the engine, and swimming until you're done....as opposed to rolling over and floating every 25 yards). That can happen in weeks.
-Breathing....I hear ya. That was my issue (still is, if the water's cold)....videos are a good start. My thing was I never got how important it was to breathe out when my face was in the water. I just sorta let the air dribble out, as opposed to purposefully getting it out.

I don't know much about cyclocross bikes and such. Others will have better input...like maybe switching out tires ands stuff. But, you can do a sprint on just about anything if the rules allow (generally fixies are out). And very possibly 'win' a Clydesdale division (depending on who else is there and the course) even on a mountain bike. Heck, people complete 70.3s on hybrids. It wouldn't be fun, and there aren't many...but it's entirely doable. Not likely to win any awards.


Welcome to the madness.



Thanks for your input!

That is me to a T, no prior technique or swimming training. Might benefit from a class or two (as mentioned below by another user). I plan on getting in the pool at least 3 times a week to hopefully increase my steady distance before race day.

Would you recommend doing intervals or even slower pace continuous?

Originally posted by atlantia

With regard to swimming, I had great success in taking group lessons at the local rec center. The price was quite reasonable, and, as most group classes of this type, there was a fair amount of attrition. What started as a class of 8 became 5 within a few weeks, so I got plenty of individualized attention.
I can't really say much about cycling, as the bike is my weak spot. However, I will say that Eagleman is a very flat course, so be prepared for wind. It also has pretty much nothing in the way of shade, so for both the bike and the run exposure/heat/humidity is a big player. The Eagleman course is known for having lots of people walking the full run leg. Many have overcooked the bike leg (biked too hard) and then aren't acclimated to the heat.
Enjoy your training!



I have thought about doing those, its something I SHOULD look into. Wouldn't hurt.

I appreciate the knowledge drop on Eagleman! I have heard that as well.

Originally posted by nc452010

On swimming......

I can comment on swimming, because I was not-so-long-ago a complete beginner. I mean I couldn't swim 200yds w/out stopping. Answer me this......how much are you swimming, right now (volume and frequency)? If it isn't 4x+/wk and 1,500yds/per......you need to swim more.

About racing as a clyde...........are you serious you're going to GAIN weight - just to race in that category?



I am as you were, if not worse, when you started out. I just started swim "training", literally did my first one monday, and doing another this afternoon and again this weekend. My plan is to get in the pool at least 2-3 times a week, more if need be.

How would you suggest I structure my training? My first workout I did 80yd intervals roughly 6 times, with some 40 yds intervals (20yd pool & didn't understand how to breath - was mostly holding my breath then gasping) so I got gased fairly early on.

I normally sit 210lb+, was sick and then went on vacation for 2 weeks + not weight training and not eating my normal diet I dropped down. So getting back to normality will be me gettting back to around that weight. Currently 205 ~10-12%BF 25yrold.

2016-07-20 11:10 AM
in reply to: nc452010

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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
for swimming if you are having a hard time managing your breath you are swimming to fast. Slow down until you get comfortable. not sure why it works for beginners but it does when you try to go slow you actually go faster. Remember slow and smooth and you will get more comfortable and faster without knowing it.

I would take the winter to build up your bike endurance. finishing a HIM is a lot about being comfortatble with riding 56 miles and not being trashed



2016-07-20 11:50 AM
in reply to: BuckHamilton

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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
Originally posted by BuckHamilton

for swimming if you are having a hard time managing your breath you are swimming to fast. Slow down until you get comfortable. not sure why it works for beginners but it does when you try to go slow you actually go faster. Remember slow and smooth and you will get more comfortable and faster without knowing it.

I would take the winter to build up your bike endurance. finishing a HIM is a lot about being comfortatble with riding 56 miles and not being trashed




Duly noted. Its something I will have to consciously work on, exhalation and slow/steady pacing.

Agreed. Longer rides are in the future for sure. Hopefully on a more fitting bike. Any suggestions for a quality entry level, hopefully less than 1k?
2016-07-20 1:18 PM
in reply to: jmhall0123


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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
I would put different tires (something like the continental GP4000s in 23 or 25) on your current bike and ride it, its 90% a road bike anyway. I don't think a road bike vs your current bike is worth much unless you were willing to pony up much more than $1k. If it were me I'd save the money as you will likely wanna plunk it down on a tri-bike in the future anyway.

Swimming, I hear you. I have been there, and still am not a fast swimmer but can swim for miles now. Breathing was the biggest hurdle, once it clicks it all becomes much easier and more fun. What worked for me was breathing every 2 strokes (on my right usually), thinking of it as "air exchange" instead of some big gulp, starting your head roll earlier than you may think, and making sure you are exhaling even as you start putting your face back in the water. That and repeating to myself that the "air is always right there" and slowing way down at first helped. It was more of a comfort thing for me, and time in the pool helps build that, so frequency is important. Lastly, when I'd get in the pool I would do a few bobs or just underwater exhales to sort of relax and get used to the sensation before I'd start my workout...and you can always use a pull-buouy to help get rid of other factors (sinking legs, kicking, etc) while you focus on breathing/comfort. Bottom line, no short cuts, but you can do it.
2016-07-20 1:21 PM
in reply to: 0

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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
Here is a thread I refer to quite a bit prior to training. "What did you wish you knew before jumping to 70.3? "

http://www.beginnertriathlete.com/discussion/forums/thread-view.asp...

Good for you! We all started at the beginning. For me, it was a sprint tri where my "swim" was 199th/200 entrants, then on to my mountain bike...
Tons of great resources and people here.



Edited by Swimbikeron 2016-07-20 1:25 PM
2016-07-20 1:32 PM
in reply to: jmhall0123

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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
http://www.runtri.com/2010/08/toughesthardest-vs-easiestfastest-hal...

Another resource:
This is a little dated (2013), but for the Ironman branded 70.3's, it gives you an idea of the relative difficulty of the courses. Eagleman is more on the challenging side. It's a great baseline that you can compare other races to by reading reviews and looking at the bike/run elevation charts that most races have.

Luckily, Steelhead (fantastic first timer race) and Racine are the two closest to me!
2016-07-20 4:34 PM
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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
My "road bike" progression has gone 1. road with clip ons, 2. tri bike, 3. road bike, 4. crossbike. I havent done any triathlons on the cross bike but have no doubt it is within fractions of a second to what the road bikes would have been. The tri bike would likely be faster but marginally so - I guess you need to decide just how serious you are going to be. For me the cross bike opens up so many options where the tri bike was soooooo limiting. Slap some road tires on the crossrip, drop the stem if you want to be a little more aero and have at it, I bet you will be surprised.

Edited by DaveL 2016-07-20 4:37 PM


2016-07-20 9:21 PM
in reply to: 0


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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
Here's my experience for what it is worth.

Got off the couch in February of '15. Was not in any kind of shape and was 35 lbs heavier than my current weight. Changed both my diet and my exercise.

Did a sprint tri on my mountain bike at age 60 that September.

Next Tri I did was IM Coeur d'Alene 60.3 in late June of 2016, a month from my 61st birthday. I wasn't fast, but I officially finished! There were athletes on the course on Tri bikes, road bikes and I even saw one mountain bike! Personally, I have a rod bike with clip on aero bars and you'll see a lot of those in a 70.3.

On the sprint I breast stroked. On the 70.3 I started out crawling but had a bunch of people collide with me, I changed my plan and went to my comfort stroke...mostly breast stroked. Have done a sprint since which I breast stroked. Especially in the sprint length races, you will see people doing good crawl, crummy crawl, breast stroke, back stroke (elementary and proper), dog paddle, etc. Yeah, this is poo pooed by the serious Tri crowd but they have already started before you and are literally exiting the water before your later starting group goes in.

I guess my point here is to have fun at whatever swim / bike / run pace you are able to achieve on that day and SAVOR your first triathlon finish!

I worked on my crawl this year. Started out not being able to do 50 yards without stopping but can now crawl 2000+ yards in 5000-1000 yard increments without stopping. Get yourself some lessons and / or join a masters swim group and your swimming will progress exponentially fast. I will be working on swim for my next 70.3 (I am going to do Cd'A, Vineman or Racine in 2017) or maybe for the Olympic distance event I have coming up in a month. That is my project over the winter. Trust me, swim improvements come quicker than you think and your world will begin to change in the pool when you get the breathing figured out. Work on that first.

Edited by HaydenHunter 2016-07-20 9:27 PM
2016-07-21 7:59 AM
in reply to: ilikepizza

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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
Originally posted by ilikepizza

I would put different tires (something like the continental GP4000s in 23 or 25) on your current bike and ride it, its 90% a road bike anyway. I don't think a road bike vs your current bike is worth much unless you were willing to pony up much more than $1k. If it were me I'd save the money as you will likely wanna plunk it down on a tri-bike in the future anyway.

Swimming, I hear you. I have been there, and still am not a fast swimmer but can swim for miles now. Breathing was the biggest hurdle, once it clicks it all becomes much easier and more fun. What worked for me was breathing every 2 strokes (on my right usually), thinking of it as "air exchange" instead of some big gulp, starting your head roll earlier than you may think, and making sure you are exhaling even as you start putting your face back in the water. That and repeating to myself that the "air is always right there" and slowing way down at first helped. It was more of a comfort thing for me, and time in the pool helps build that, so frequency is important. Lastly, when I'd get in the pool I would do a few bobs or just underwater exhales to sort of relax and get used to the sensation before I'd start my workout...and you can always use a pull-buouy to help get rid of other factors (sinking legs, kicking, etc) while you focus on breathing/comfort. Bottom line, no short cuts, but you can do it.


Got it, I'll probably do that for this race then. Would I have to buy new wheels, or will the tires be fine on the current set up?

Gotcha. With swim training #2 done, breathing was a little easier. Still feeling out of breath/burning too quickly it seems - either I am not exhaling smoothly and properly and/or I am not intaking enough air or am doing it in a weird manner. I am not entirely sure what my problem is, will have to keep paying attention to it. But, I was able to swim slightly longer for a few intervals, hoping to slowly but surely get my technique better and endurance.


Originally posted by swimbikeron

Here is a thread I refer to quite a bit prior to training. "What did you wish you knew before jumping to 70.3? "

http://www.beginnertriathlete.com/discussion/forums/thread-view.asp...

Good for you! We all started at the beginning. For me, it was a sprint tri where my "swim" was 199th/200 entrants, then on to my mountain bike...
Tons of great resources and people here.



Originally posted by swimbikeron

http://www.runtri.com/2010/08/toughesthardest-vs-easiestfastest-hal...

Another resource:
This is a little dated (2013), but for the Ironman branded 70.3's, it gives you an idea of the relative difficulty of the courses. Eagleman is more on the challenging side. It's a great baseline that you can compare other races to by reading reviews and looking at the bike/run elevation charts that most races have.

Luckily, Steelhead (fantastic first timer race) and Racine are the two closest to me!


Awesome!! I greatly appreciate it. I will have to read into those.

Its good to hear that other people start literally from 0 as well. Makes it more the challenge, right? Or I"ll just keep telling myself that until I get better haha

Originally posted by DaveL

My "road bike" progression has gone 1. road with clip ons, 2. tri bike, 3. road bike, 4. crossbike. I havent done any triathlons on the cross bike but have no doubt it is within fractions of a second to what the road bikes would have been. The tri bike would likely be faster but marginally so - I guess you need to decide just how serious you are going to be. For me the cross bike opens up so many options where the tri bike was soooooo limiting. Slap some road tires on the crossrip, drop the stem if you want to be a little more aero and have at it, I bet you will be surprised.


Thanks for that info. It helps me feel more comfortable with making that adjustment for now. Will look into putting road tires on her.

Originally posted by Hayden Hunter

Here's my experience for what it is worth.

Got off the couch in February of '15. Was not in any kind of shape and was 35 lbs heavier than my current weight. Changed both my diet and my exercise.

Did a sprint tri on my mountain bike at age 60 that September.

Next Tri I did was IM Coeur d'Alene 60.3 in late June of 2016, a month from my 61st birthday. I wasn't fast, but I officially finished! There were athletes on the course on Tri bikes, road bikes and I even saw one mountain bike! Personally, I have a rod bike with clip on aero bars and you'll see a lot of those in a 70.3.

On the sprint I breast stroked. On the 70.3 I started out crawling but had a bunch of people collide with me, I changed my plan and went to my comfort stroke...mostly breast stroked. Have done a sprint since which I breast stroked. Especially in the sprint length races, you will see people doing good crawl, crummy crawl, breast stroke, back stroke (elementary and proper), dog paddle, etc. Yeah, this is poo pooed by the serious Tri crowd but they have already started before you and are literally exiting the water before your later starting group goes in.

I guess my point here is to have fun at whatever swim / bike / run pace you are able to achieve on that day and SAVOR your first triathlon finish!

I worked on my crawl this year. Started out not being able to do 50 yards without stopping but can now crawl 2000+ yards in 5000-1000 yard increments without stopping. Get yourself some lessons and / or join a masters swim group and your swimming will progress exponentially fast. I will be working on swim for my next 70.3 (I am going to do Cd'A, Vineman or Racine in 2017) or maybe for the Olympic distance event I have coming up in a month. That is my project over the winter. Trust me, swim improvements come quicker than you think and your world will begin to change in the pool when you get the breathing figured out. Work on that first.


Awesome man! YOu're killing it!

On my first day, I could barely do 60-80yds without stopping and gasping for breath. Day 2 was slightly better threw some 120yd's in there and more consistently did 80's. I guess I just keep building.


Any suggestions on pool workouts? I am just doing intervals with maybe 60-90 sec rest? ex. 80yds -rest -120yds - rest - 80yds - rest - etc and got up to 1,000yds total yesterday.
2016-07-21 8:54 AM
in reply to: 0


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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
Swimming: you have a tough row to hoe, as the expression goes. Best bet is to find a local masters group with a decent coach and practice practice practice. Good news is that there are a lot of "easy" minutes to pick up there since you are starting from scratch...

Also, buy a wetsuit, but don't listen to the people who tell you you need a 1000, 500, or even 250 dollar variety... if you look for sales you can snag a good entry level suit for well under 200 bucks that will help you a TON on longer swims. The last half iron distance race I did, only 1 guy went under 30 min (course was way long), and he was wearing an orca equipe he picked up for 130 bucks on sale... literally minutes ahead of the rest of the field of peolle in their 900 and 1000 dollar top of the line suits.

On the bike: put some road tires on the cyclecross bike and call it good for the sprint. If you still want to do a half after the sprint, then is the time to look into a tri or aero road bike. That will save you minutes over the 'cross bike and also leave you fresher for the run. Again, don't get caught up in the superbike arms race... there are a lot of amazing entry level bikes and used bikes out there that give you great bang for buck.

That being said, if you only plan on doing ONE half and then being done, again, just run the 'cross bike.

After the bike and swim training, next best cash investments are an aero or aero road helmet, a tri kit, and last, race wheels....

Oh, and once you start logging a lot of training, dont be surprised if you drop so much weight you no longer are a clydesdale...


Edited by davejustdave 2016-07-21 8:58 AM
2016-07-21 8:57 AM
in reply to: jmhall0123

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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
If you are going to do eagleman, prepare for excessive heat and humidity.
Probably 2x of what was at Syracuse.
Also, eagleman is pancake flat.
It's a lot harder than anyone will tell you.

Find a team, or a masters swim, get the technique correct.
Bike, - just bike, bike and bike.

Do a bunch of BRic workouts to get used to running off the bike.

Prepare for 13.1 mile run in mega heat.

That's just my 2c on eagleman and newbie stuff.
2016-07-21 9:38 AM
in reply to: jmhall0123


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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
The need for new wheels would depend on what they currently are, a bike shop or a bit of googling might help, or just buy one tire and see if it fits on the front and go from there. I can tell you that I have a cross bike that had 33's on them and I swapped them to 25 gatorskins for commuting around and they work just fine. I would imagine your Trek could be similar.


2016-07-21 10:00 AM
in reply to: davejustdave

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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
Originally posted by davejustdave

Swimming: you have a tough row to hoe, as the expression goes. Best bet is to find a local masters group with a decent coach and practice practice practice. Good news is that there are a lot of "easy" minutes to pick up there since you are starting from scratch...

Also, buy a wetsuit, but don't listen to the people who tell you you need a 1000, 500, or even 250 dollar variety... if you look for sales you can snag a good entry level suit for well under 200 bucks that will help you a TON on longer swims. The last half iron distance race I did, only 1 guy went under 30 min (course was way long), and he was wearing an orca equipe he picked up for 130 bucks on sale... literally minutes ahead of the rest of the field of peolle in their 900 and 1000 dollar top of the line suits.

On the bike: put some road tires on the cyclecross bike and call it good for the sprint. If you still want to do a half after the sprint, then is the time to look into a tri or aero road bike. That will save you minutes over the 'cross bike and also leave you fresher for the run. Again, don't get caught up in the superbike arms race... there are a lot of amazing entry level bikes and used bikes out there that give you great bang for buck.

That being said, if you only plan on doing ONE half and then being done, again, just run the 'cross bike.

After the bike and swim training, next best cash investments are an aero or aero road helmet, a tri kit, and last, race wheels....

Oh, and once you start logging a lot of training, dont be surprised if you drop so much weight you no longer are a clydesdale...



I may benefit from getting into a class of somesort. I believe I know what I have to improve on, but applying that while I am hurting in the water is not as easy haha.

Appreciate it. Does help to hear that my bike will suffice, one less thing for me to worry about. Just get after it!

Yeah, doing the clydesdale would be cool. Normally sitting over 210, but after 3 weeks of no weight training and 2 of those weeks being on vacation backpacking and climbing Mt Raininer, my weight has dropped some. So, we'll see. No harm no foul either way.


Originally posted by louamerica

If you are going to do eagleman, prepare for excessive heat and humidity.
Probably 2x of what was at Syracuse.
Also, eagleman is pancake flat.
It's a lot harder than anyone will tell you.

Find a team, or a masters swim, get the technique correct.
Bike, - just bike, bike and bike.

Do a bunch of BRic workouts to get used to running off the bike.

Prepare for 13.1 mile run in mega heat.

That's just my 2c on eagleman and newbie stuff.



I appreciate it. On paper it seems much easier than I hear it is, from internet folk and friends. Would you have any other suggestions for a beginner, in the relative area of MD?

I appreciate the info.
2016-07-21 5:38 PM
in reply to: jmhall0123


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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
This is a great place to find races of all types: http://www.runningintheusa.com/

Also, I agree with those who say your cross bike should be perfectly adequate for the Sprint and even the HIM. Check you current tires, they're probably 700C with a certain width. Most likely you can run 25mm road tires like Continental GP4000s without a problem.
2016-07-22 10:21 AM
in reply to: MikeD1

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Subject: RE: Tri-newbie seeking guidance...Road to 70.3
Originally posted by MikeD1

This is a great place to find races of all types: http://www.runningintheusa.com/

Also, I agree with those who say your cross bike should be perfectly adequate for the Sprint and even the HIM. Check you current tires, they're probably 700C with a certain width. Most likely you can run 25mm road tires like Continental GP4000s without a problem.


Appreciate the link. Will look at it!

I will have to get smart on tires, or swing by my local shop.

Thanks!
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author : FitWerx
comments : 1
Dean from Fitwerx answers a BT member question about what kind of bike should be the "next bike."
 
date : December 27, 2008
author : FitWerx
comments : 9
Are you a beginner triathlete? This video will compare triathlon bikes and road bikes to help you figure out what is best for you as you begin your triathlon training.
date : August 21, 2008
author : TriChica
comments : 8
I thought of all the times I didn’t attempt something I wanted to do because I was too afraid of trying something new or of failing completely.
 
date : August 21, 2008
author : vm354
comments : 1
How Pilates training helped a wanna-be triathlete realize the goal of completing a half-Ironman, Ironman 70.3 Rhode Island.
date : February 7, 2008
author : nxm165
comments : 1
Initial adventures of another 40-something entering the world of tri.
 
date : January 1, 2008
author : jgosse66
comments : 0
Here is my five step plan for getting mentally prepared for next year’s Ironman Newfoundland 70.3, or any other race that you may have.
date : October 4, 2007
author : jgosse66
comments : 0
It was the morning of Ironman Newfoundland 70.3, I felt queasy. I didn't want to eat or drink anything. I had a full blown case of the pre-race HEEBEE GEEBEES.
 
date : June 6, 2006
author : Ingrid Loos
comments : 4
A bad race left me smoldering, but time and a gentle breeze ignited my passion to race again.