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2016-09-15 8:37 AM
in reply to: nc452010

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Subject: RE: Pushing yourself during a race - how do you do it?

Originally posted by nc452010 I don't know how anyone would really know how hard they CAN push themselves......unless they've blown up, before. That being said, I have metrics I can track on the bike (HR and power). On the run, I have a tendency to go hard, right off the bike. I have always had to dial myself down a notch or three, after the first 1/2 mile or so.....thinking I probably can't sustain that pace for (_____mi). My plan is to back off less and less ......until I blow up....lol.

 

Note: I have blown up multiple time before.  When you are a 3:03 type Marathon runner of of 5:05 type 70.1 triathlete and you really want to breath through the 3 hour barrier or the 5 hour barrier it easy to over do it. 

 

Oh...and no I don't have pain in every race.  The races I do the best in I usually cross the finish line feeling great.  The ones that get painful the performance suffers.  My friends who is a pilot said for every take of he logs he has to log one landing.  Landing are a lot more difficult than take offs but he can't afford to let there be more take offs than landing on this log book.  I like wise have a goal to have one race finish for every race start.  No matter how hard it gets I find a way to keep going and try to finish in the best time I can.  Even if I have no chance of making a PR I always finish strong.



2016-09-15 10:39 AM
in reply to: donw

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Subject: RE: Pushing yourself during a race - how do you do it?

Originally posted by donw
Originally posted by d00d
Originally posted by nc452010 I don't know how anyone would really know how hard they CAN push themselves......unless they've blown up, before. That being said, I have metrics I can track on the bike (HR and power). On the run, I have a tendency to go hard, right off the bike. I have always had to dial myself down a notch or three, after the first 1/2 mile or so.....thinking I probably can't sustain that pace for (_____mi). My plan is to back off less and less ......until I blow up....lol.
you have to push yourself in training to know what you can handle on race day. i do some REALLY hard workouts in training. some are so hard that I feel like puking afterwards. it is not pleasant, it is very uncomfortable, but you have to teach yourself to suffer. i hate to cross the line, of any race, knowing that I could have pushed it harder. yes, i've blown up (as recently as this past Saturday), but most of the time, it is the opposite. train like you fight/race.
I don't know - this almost sounds like your goal is to maximize suffering. I'm not sure that's what leads to the fastest times. I get this if you're really racing against people. If you're trying to beat a rival of equal ability, then desire, toughness, determination etc can determine who wins. But most of us are racing the clock. I think that staying focused and having the ability to suffer is important, but I don't see the need to step it up from suffering to SUFFERING. I'm an old fart with a 5km race PB of around 21:35. I need to push myself to achieve this but I sure don't claim to be SUFFERING in some kind of "dark place". If i did SUFFER how much time would I gain? 15 seconds? 20 seconds? I really have no idea, but given my training and ability I don't think I'm going to lower my time to 21:00 by suffering more. I think that most of us can probably make bigger gains by learning better pacing and race day execution. Don

That's why he said it was only some of the workouts, not all. It's not all workouts, or even all hard workouts. Just some. FTP or threshold tests can be examples of this.

Racing the clock does not lessen learning to suffer. It changes things from making more (relatively) brief breaks from other contestants to a more constant output that steadily hurts more as time goes on. At the end it's going to hurt. A lot. Things like time trials can be a killer.

2016-09-15 11:39 AM
in reply to: brigby1

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Subject: RE: Pushing yourself during a race - how do you do it?

So based on an earlier recommendation I started listening to the Matt Fitzgerald's book, How Bad Do You Want It?.  It's perfect!  It talks about the science and psychology around the mental component of endurance sports.  Boy, I wish I had tapped into this a year (or more) ago...

Anyway, one thing worth mentioning to the group is that he specifically points out that it's now the "old way" to assume performance is all based on physical training.  While good physical training is a component, an equally physically capable person will get different results when mixed with psychological elements.  There's a great anecdote in chapter 1 about the 2009 Chicago marathon and Samuel Wanjiru that drives this point home.

I'm only in about chapter 3, but it's a good read for anyone interested in this topic.

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