General Discussion Triathlon Talk » (Not) just another bike thread Rss Feed  
Moderators: k9car363, alicefoeller Reply
2021-03-16 4:21 AM


7

Subject: (Not) just another bike thread
Hello,

I would like to launch yet another thread about what bike and how many bikes to own.

There is a lot to find about "triathlon bike vs road bike", especially for beginners. Basically the conclusion is usually that a road bike is the way to go because of versatility, price, etc.

However ... Being a beginner triathlete, with a cycling background, I see for my self 3 big things to focus on (probably there are more)
* Becoming a better swimmer
* Staying injury free with running
* Getting familiar with a more TT position on a bike

As i want to progress to long distance triathlon in a couple of years, I believe it's important to not wait to long with that third one. (I can imagine that a lot of people will say it's the least important thing)

So, my question is ...
What do you think about the need for owning a second bike (road or tri), one for your road bike training and one for your specific tri position training. Because although road bikes are claimed to be versatile, i can imagine it's quite inconvenient to always having to switch between your road fit and tri fit? Or is it possible to get somewhat of a hybrid fit or something ?

Thanks a lot for your opinion on this!


2021-03-17 8:19 AM
in reply to: 0


7

Subject: RE: (Not) just another bike thread
I've been chatting with the customer service of Cube and Canyon. And apparently, with the high end road bikes, it isn't that easy to clip on some tri bar extensions. This is mainly because of "carbon weakness" and internal cable routing, making it harder to switch to "normal" handlebars.

In cayon's case, it wasn't possible for the completely internally routed bikes. Some quotes from canyon:

"It is not possible to change the cockpit on internal routed bikes. This is possible on the Ultimate and Aeroad CF SL which is not integrated:"

"The H36 triathlon extension will not be sold anymore since the installation is too critical and difficult with a lot of chance to damage the cockpit"

In Cube's case you could buy different handlebars that are specifically designed to add tri extensions. Think it are these ones https://www.cube.eu/en/equipment/components/handlebars-handlebar-tap...

Does anyone know of any mid to high end bikes for which this is not that much of a hassle ?

Edited by ggoysens 2021-03-17 8:25 AM
2021-03-17 11:59 AM
in reply to: ggoysens


1

Subject: RE: (Not) just another bike thread
good
2021-03-17 12:03 PM
in reply to: ggoysens

User image

Expert
1023
1000
lake forest, California
Subject: RE: (Not) just another bike thread

My personal opinion is a tri specific bike is not necessary at all, especially for long course.

If you're racing for podium position, that may be a different story.

2021-03-17 2:03 PM
in reply to: ggoysens

User image

Champion
7475
50002000100100100100252525
Placitas, New Mexico
Subject: RE: (Not) just another bike thread

My reply last night got swallowed up in re-loggin in.    

If you come from a cycling background, ONE is never the correct number of bikes (it's only slightly better than zero).  

A tri bike won't be welcome at cycling community group rides, so if that's important to you...

I did my first triathlons on a steel framed mountain bike.  

Then I got an old Raleigh Technium and added century bars.  

Then I got a deal on a Klein Aeolus (tri bike) and passed the Raleigh along.  

Then I got a deal on a Javelin Fara (road bike) and added century bars.  

I've got less invested in my bikes than some people spend on race wheels.  

I've done 3 iron distance races.  Usually, I've left the Klein on the trainer and rode the Javelin outside but ride the Klein leading up to a race including at least 1 century.  All told, I've put over 6000 miles on the Javelin and over 5000 on the Klein.  

I had a buddy suggest I should "upgrade" to a modern tri-bike, but I can state emphatically:  "The bike has never limited my performance!(Not even my first tri because I'd ridden 6-8 times prior to that race.)  At IMCdA, there were 2 Kleins among the 2200 participants, and I liken it to a '63 Sting Ray vs. a C6 Corvette...A new tri bike would be faster, but my Klein has character (plus history).  

My experience is I get ~+1 mph on the tri bike.  From 17 to 18 mph over 112 miles, that's 22 minutes (on a 12+ hour race).  On an OLY, bumping from 20 to 21 mph saves 3.5 minutes (on a 2:45 race).  If you're faster, the gains are smaller but more justified.  

 

2021-03-17 2:21 PM
in reply to: ggoysens

User image


1216
1000100100
McAlester, Oklahoma
Subject: RE: (Not) just another bike thread

I have three (3) tri bike, but two of them of for sale.  

1) 2001 - Cannondale Multisport 60cm - This bike is what got me hooked on the sport.  It was a little long for me so my second bike was to improve fit

2) 2009 - Kestrel Talon SL 57 cm.  - I did the professional bike fit before looking for my second bike.  The criterion my fitter gave be for stake and reach mins and max eliminated 90% of what was on the market.  This bike was the best deal I could find that fit my criterion.

3) 2011 - Blue Triad SL 56 cm - When I was looking for my second bike the only bike that I came across that fit all of the dimensions that my bike fitter gave me was a Blue Triad.  So when I found someone local selling one that only had about 2,000 miles on it that came with Flo 90 carbon race wheels for $1,600.00 I thought it might be good to have a back up for when the second bike that I had put about 15,000 miles on eventually needed to be rotated out.  Well, the Blue Triad was not the same geometry is the version I had found in the bike geometry data base previously that had fit all my ideal dimensions so I got it anyways just work with for a while to see how a superbike compared with my entry-level bikes.  I spent months trying to get me and that bike to fit each other.  It is a decent fit now after some bike modifications and some changes to my bike position. I did win the only race that I have been able to do on it with the fastest bike split of the day but the Kestrel Talon that didn't require any bike modification or change in my position is possibly a better bike for me.  I have been riding only the Blue Triad for the past 7 months since I got it.  Since I am not riding bike 1 or 2 they need to be sold.

 

All three of my bike are Tri bikes.  I don't currently have a road bike.  I didn't see the big deal about staying aero when I got my first bike.  I had been training for a few weeks on a mountain bike for my first Triathlon before I got it.  When I got it I went out for a long ride the first week I had it and stayed Aero for 100% of that ride.  I  pretty much rode 100% of the time every time I was on it after that.  Piece of cake, no problem.

When I got my second bike I would ride aero 100% of my time outdoors too.  I got a bike trainer after two years and on the indoor train i did a lot of upright riding.

When I got the 3rd bike I began to hate riding aero.  It was not a fun experience with a bike that did not fit me well (and I thought that the first bike didn't fit me well).  So...on the trainer, I switch from aero to upright all the time and it si just fine.  I think going from road to TT bike would be very doable as long as the TT bike is a good fit.  If the 

 

Originally posted by ggoysens Hello, I would like to launch yet another thread about what bike and how many bikes to own. There is a lot to find about "triathlon bike vs road bike", especially for beginners. Basically the conclusion is usually that a road bike is the way to go because of versatility, price, etc. However ... Being a beginner triathlete, with a cycling background, I see for my self 3 big things to focus on (probably there are more) * Becoming a better swimmer * Staying injury free with running * Getting familiar with a more TT position on a bike As i want to progress to long distance triathlon in a couple of years, I believe it's important to not wait to long with that third one. (I can imagine that a lot of people will say it's the least important thing) So, my question is ... What do you think about the need for owning a second bike (road or tri), one for your road bike training and one for your specific tri position training. Because although road bikes are claimed to be versatile, i can imagine it's quite inconvenient to always having to switch between your road fit and tri fit? Or is it possible to get somewhat of a hybrid fit or something ? Thanks a lot for your opinion on this!



2021-03-18 3:31 PM
in reply to: 0

User image

Champion
10003
50005000
, Minnesota
Gold member
Subject: RE: (Not) just another bike thread

When I was mainly focusing on triathlon training, I had a tribike.   I rode that bike for all "training rides".  If I did other riding and I thought the tribike wouldn't work (too hilly, or a group ride) I would ride my road bike.  When training for a half iron distance tri, I even used my tribike for a long distance cycling event (not a race) so I could benefit from the training.  I just stayed away from crowds.  

There are several questions stated and possibly unstated, which I will try to answer here:

  1. A tribike is great, if you can afford it.  Go for it, no need to wait until you get to a certain ability.  I would try a race first, just to make sure you like it. 
  2. I did start with clamp-on aerobars before investing in a tribike.   I thought they helped a lot and I didn't know enough to get hung up on position.  They gave me a big time advantage right off the bat.  Because...
  3. Aerobars offer a huge advantage in a sport where you cannot ride in a group and may be riding for a long time, so the multiple positions are great.  Lots of times when I am on my roadie, on a windy country road, I miss those bars!
  4. More bikes is better than fewer bikes. Situations where you don't use a tribike:  riding with kids, riding around the city for brunch/brews, group rides in the country, riding in the snow, riding to the grocery store.  These are all things I do, so I have different bikes.    None of them are expensive, but purpose-built and worth maintaining.
  5. The bike is a BIG part of triathlons, regardless of length.  I personally feel that your time is best spent improving bike fitness and all related skills and tools for the bike, such as a fast transition, tri-specific shoes, etc.  

I have since moved on from triathlon, so I told my tribike.  If I raced again, I would just make do with my roadie.  Good luck to you!



Edited by BikerGrrrl 2021-03-18 3:34 PM
2021-03-18 4:06 PM
in reply to: ggoysens

User image

Lethbridge, Alberta
Bronze member
Subject: RE: (Not) just another bike thread
You don't have to spend a lot of money. Just make sure you're comfortable on whatever you're riding.

My first three triathlons were a "super-sprint", a sprint, and an Oly, and I used a hard-tail, front suspension mountain bike for those. Try not to laugh, but I'd fitted it with clip-on aerobars, replaced the stem, and played with the seat position to get down and comfortable. Then I bought a road bike and fitted the aerobars to it for my first half IM. That road bike carried me through a bunch of half IM events, two full IMs, and some shorter races in the 15 years since then. I get reasonably aero too, usually passing everyone in sight on the downhills.

You may want to go for a serious tri-bike if you're trying to shave minutes. I always figured I could do that more efficiently by training more.
2021-03-19 11:48 AM
in reply to: 0

User image

Extreme Veteran
717
500100100
Chicago, USA
Subject: RE: (Not) just another bike thread
Originally posted by ggoysens
What do you think about the need for owning a second bike (road or tri), one for your road bike training and one for your specific tri position training. Because although road bikes are claimed to be versatile, i can imagine it's quite inconvenient to always having to switch between your road fit and tri fit? Or is it possible to get somewhat of a hybrid fit or something ?


You don't need to compromise and get a hybrid fit. You can actually get the best of both worlds. You can get a tri bike fit and nearly all of the aero advantages of a tri bike PLUS a very high level of versatility with a tri bike if you try what some call "the third option".

If you want to learn more, we have a short write up here:
https://www.darkspeedworks.com/blog-triathlonbike.htm





Edited by DarkSpeedWorks 2021-03-19 11:50 AM
2021-03-19 2:14 PM
in reply to: 0


7

Subject: RE: (Not) just another bike thread
Thank you all for the answers.

I have the feeling the question wasn't 100% clear to everyone.

I'm not really trying to start the debate tri vs road bike.
I'm trying to figure out how much of a hasstle it is if you want to switch between training in your tri position and training in you road position if you only have one bike. I assume it's not like you can just your road position and slam some aerobars on them without altering you position? But if you alter your position for the aerobars, your road cycling might be compromised?

So if you have to constantly switch between your road and tri bike fit, assuming they are quite different, it seems convenient to have a second bike?

I'm mainly asking this to figure out if I will postpone buying a second bike (probably a road bike). If i can do both training in aerobars and normal road cycling on the same bike without having to change the fit each time, I will probably postpone buying the second bike.

Edited by ggoysens 2021-03-19 2:16 PM
2021-03-19 2:25 PM
in reply to: ggoysens

User image

Extreme Veteran
717
500100100
Chicago, USA
Subject: RE: (Not) just another bike thread
You're not gonna easily get a good tri forward body position on a road bike without accepting some bad compromises. The way people used to do it was with a forward seat post which put your body weight way too far forward and then highly compromised handling (and safe stopping).

However, a tri frame has a longer front center, so it can accept the tri forward body position with totally normal handling. So, if you have one bike (I assume you have a tri bike?), you can either ride it as a normal TT/Tri bike. Or, you can try the drop bar approach (per the blog post linked above) with the bike, but you can still keep essentially the same seat angle and torso position. And you can also add clip-ons and then get essentially the same aerodynamics as you would get with a full standard tri bike aerobar set up. But you still have the 'road bike' versatility regarding handling and braking and drop bar hand positions

Is this more applicable to your question?


New Thread
General Discussion Triathlon Talk » (Not) just another bike thread Rss Feed  
RELATED POSTS

Black Friday / Cyber Monday Thread 2020

Started by liverusty
Views: 263 Posts: 2

2020-11-22 10:25 AM jmhpsu93

Tri Bike vs Road Bike with aero add ons

Started by NealeinMI
Views: 709 Posts: 9

2020-07-29 11:45 AM Porfirio

05.13.2020 Why not Wednesday

Started by PigeonTri
Views: 142 Posts: 3

2020-05-13 6:56 PM alltom1

Washable Spin Bike Cover?

Started by Swimbikeron
Views: 147 Posts: 1

2020-04-05 1:11 PM Swimbikeron

TT Bike Sizing Question

Started by Splice111
Views: 130 Posts: 2

2020-03-22 2:25 PM Parkland