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2013-08-02 1:14 PM

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Subject: Gluten free diets and triathlon training.
I did a search and didn't find what I was looking for so here it goes...

Has anyone on here made the switch to a gluten free diet? How did it go? What types of food do you eat? Did you switch to gluten free baking or just cut out bakes goods altogether? What changes did you feel physically from it?

LisaC, in one of the posts I found in the search, you mention being gluten free for 3o+ years. What effects have you noticed on your life as a whole? when going out? Ordering out? Socially?

It has been suggested that we try a gluten and processed sugar free diet for our three year old to help with what most people would diagnose as ADHD. While I am a big fan of wearing my children out and keeping them stimulated as opposed to meds, I am certainly open to the idea of a dietary change, but am not willing to force it upon only one member of the family. It doesn't really seem fair for our 3yr old to watch his brother have a donut from Tim's (for example) while I hand him some apple slices (obviously this is the better choice anyway, but I am just trying to provide an example). So, it is a big decision because if we are going to make the change we will do it as a whole family.

Any input regarding how it affected you, your family, training, energy... anything is appreciated.


2013-08-02 1:27 PM
in reply to: wide awake

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Kansas
Subject: RE: Gluten free diets and triathlon training.

I was diagnosed with Celiac as a baby so never knew a "non-gluten-free" life. My experience, in that regard, may not be helpful. My sister and mother, however, were both diagnosed as adults and I know their experience was a big lifestyle shift.

But as far as socially, it's as big of a deal as you want to make it. I don't like bringing attention to it (most people assume I'm picky or have jumped on the newest celebrity diet) but on the other hand I will be sick for days if I don't pay attention and ask questions. It's a balance.

Growing up I was the only member of my family with Celiac - we had special "Lisa food" and it was just not that big of a deal from what I remember- it's just how it was. I learned that it did not matter if Dad or sister was eating an oreo because I knew how sick one bite would make me and that was enough of a deterrent in itself. I did have to bring lunch every day of the school year as the cafeteria food was not friendly - and had to bring my own snacks for b-day parties and didn't get to do pizza day. But again, that's all I ever knew so no big deal to me.

As far as triathlon training (looking at thread title but don't see a specific question), a lot of nutrition products are gluten free (GU, Infinit, Hammer, etc.) so no worries there. There's a diverse variety of carb-tastic gluten free foods in the form of pasta, pizza, breads, bagels, muffins, cookies, brownies, etc. that are readily available at most chain grocery stores, and even more at a Whole Foods/Trader Joes type of place. A FAR CRY from what was available growing up in the 80s. 

Feel free to PM me with other questions, or if you need food/meal ideas. Happy to help.

2013-08-02 1:38 PM
in reply to: wide awake

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Subject: RE: Gluten free diets and triathlon training.
I have been "mostly" gluten free for a few months now (gave it up for Lent, and kept going with it), and it was very tough at first, but I have to say the change has been very positive for me. The reason I say mostly is because of the social situations, where I am at a friend or family member's house for a meal, I eat what is served. I've never wanted to be the type that is picky when someone is being gracious (the exception, of course being allergies or gluten intolerance). But when I'm at home, it's gluten free for me.

It was really tough to give up pizza and pasta, and I never thought it would be so hard to give up bread! Within a couple weeks I discovered my energy had improved dramatically, and that my workouts "felt" more productive and less tiring. That was a huge deal for me, because it was really hard for me to get out of bed early, but the extra energy and better feeling workouts motivated me much more.

As far as diet, I try to mix in a lot more rice, beans, and quinoa into lots of different foods for carbs (and good protein). I also eat lots more fruits and veggies. Oats are also a choice, although there is some controversy there because of cross contamination concerns, so some care would be needed in selecting the right product. I'd say give it a couple weeks as a test and see how good you feel. The change has been a great experience for me! Good luck to you!
2013-08-02 2:45 PM
in reply to: wide awake

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Master
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Subject: RE: Gluten free diets and triathlon training.

Interesting question. My son (now 24) was diagnosed with ADD (no HLaughing) when he was in 3rd grade, so about 16 years ago. The doctors suggested a healthy diet but I don't recall a mention of gluten. Of course it was 16 years ago and I'm not sure I would have known what gluten was.

Anyway, nobody at our house has Celiac's. However, I share our dinner meals (double up) with families who do. So I cook mostly gluten free at our house and pride myself on making it taste "normal". Many of the meals are naturally gluten free, using rice, quinoa etc, but I also do a lot of baking using a variety of flours. I agree that there are also some great GF products, especially at Whole Foods and Sprouts, I've found our local Trader Joe's to be less GF friendly.

As for treating the kids the same, that could be a whole thread in itself but I will simply share that the families I cook for do allow the non-Celiac kids to have gluten.

As for the affect on training, I'm not strictly GF so I don't know that my results would be accurate. I follow a blog of an Ultra Marathoner in Colorado who is GF and seems to do quite well with it (and he writes amazing GF cookbooks). His blog is:

www.noglutennoproblem.blogspot.com

2013-08-02 3:42 PM
in reply to: 0

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Subject: RE: Gluten free diets and triathlon training.

I have been about 95% gluten free since January. I don't use replacement products- I just focus on whole foods. I base my diet on Vegetables, fruits, seeds, nuts, beans, healthy fats,& some grain occasionally (brown rice, quinoa) and some meat.

I am not celiac, however I am ADHD. I had a naturopathic chiropractor tell me I was gluten intolerant (sensitive)- he said try leaving it off and see what happens.

I find when I cheat and eat bread not only do I now notice digestive upsets, but I am foggy & unfocused mentally for several days and super tired. (maybe the H is wearing down, I am 47). 

The first thing I noticed when I had cut gluten for about 2 weeks was how clear & focused my mind was and how much shockingly sharper my memory was. My oldest is ADHD and based on the difference it has made for me (with focus and productivity), if he was still a child I would not hesitate to eliminate gluten (and sugar) from his diet.

*Edit- I realize gluten is more than bread, but I love bread so if I am cheating Panara bread  or pizza it is (even through I always totally regret it!)



Edited by Evergreen 2013-08-02 3:47 PM
2013-08-02 3:58 PM
in reply to: Evergreen


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Subject: RE: Gluten free diets and triathlon training.
My wife and one of my kids decided to change to a gluten free diet in hopes of clearing up a lot of digestive issues. It has worked wonderfully for them. If you have a medical need to be gluten free, its manageable.

But for those going gluten free as a diet choice, its not worth the hassle or the increased cost. Who in their right mind would voluntarily give up doughnuts? That's just silly.





2013-08-02 4:40 PM
in reply to: Evergreen

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Subject: RE: Gluten free diets and triathlon training.
Originally posted by Evergreen

I realize gluten is more than bread, but I love bread so if I am cheating Panara bread  or pizza it is (even through I always totally regret it!)




I'm totally with you! I occasionally love to cheat with pizza and bread, but it's painful - and sometimes worth it despite the consequences!
2013-08-02 4:45 PM
in reply to: wide awake

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Champion
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Subject: RE: Gluten free diets and triathlon training.
I went gluten free starting this winter due to the cross over antibodies to thyroid (I have an autoimmune thyroid issue and gluten can affect it) with the side effect of my environmental allergies clearing up.

I never tested myself for celiac but it is possible I also have it - don't want to know

anyway I was already using bonk breaker bars because I like them and they are gluten free.

Have used some substitute products, and when my kitchen is completed will definitely be experimenting.
2013-08-02 4:49 PM
in reply to: wide awake

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Subject: RE: Gluten free diets and triathlon training.
I'm what I call gluten-free by necessity, paleo by choice. Gluten sensitivity diagnosed about 5 years ago (my entire dad's side of the family has it -- not uncommon in those of Eastern European descent) and I made a clean break. Went mostly paleo about 2 years ago.

I started experiencing health benefits immediately after going GF (mostly stomach issues disappearing). In most cases I just used replacement foods -- gluten-free flours, cereals (there are plenty of kid-friendly GF cereals out there) cookies, pasta, etc. I also bought a KitchenAid mixer and learned how to bake. You can buy things like donut pans if you want to bake treats both kids can enjoy, and there are tons of GF cookie and brownie mixes out there now.

I cut back on the replacement foods when I started getting serious about marathon and triathlon training mostly to cut out the empty carbs and sugars. Lettuce wraps instead of sandwiches, zucchini noodles instead of regular noodles, for example. I figured the extra veggies certainly couldn't hurt. When I tried the paleo diet I noticed a few other health benefits (HUGE improvement with my thyroid issues, which go hand-in-hand with gluten sensitivity) and stuck with it. I still have a GF goodie binge after every race (mostly cheese, cupcakes and sushi.... mmmmmm) because hey, I'm human.

As far as affecting me socially, I've taken a liking to hard cider. Going out to eat, I can usually get a burger with no bun at the very least. Dessert is kind of a bummer but it's also a blessing that I can't order whatever I want from the bakery anyway.

And as far as what I eat for training, I eat a LOT of potatoes. =) I usually eat potatoes instead of pasta the few days before a race, and have a coconut-milk smoothie after a hard workout instead of a bagel. I have to keep my blood sugar from dropping (thyroid issues mentioned above) so I do take gels and sport beans, after making sure don't have wheat or rice flour -- which eliminates most chews.

It'll take a little work to get in a routine but it'll become second nature soon enough. Hoping for good results for your little one!
2013-08-03 12:42 AM
in reply to: Miles around Midtown

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Coldstream ,BC
Subject: RE: Gluten free diets and triathlon training.
Thanks to everyone that responded. I really appreciate your feedback.
2013-08-03 9:14 AM
in reply to: adamchill

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Kansas
Subject: RE: Gluten free diets and triathlon training.
Originally posted by adamchill
Originally posted by Evergreen

I realize gluten is more than bread, but I love bread so if I am cheating Panara bread  or pizza it is (even through I always totally regret it!)

I'm totally with you! I occasionally love to cheat with pizza and bread, but it's painful - and sometimes worth it despite the consequences!

There are some REALLY good gluten free pizzas and breads out there - just sayin! You can still get your fix without getting sick

My favs:
Amy's organics rice crust pizzas
This homemade pizza crust
Domino's GF pizza
This homemade bread (I use bread machine)
Udi's bread (white and multi grain)
Canyon Bakehouse bread (multi grain



2013-08-03 3:34 PM
in reply to: lisac957


8

Subject: RE: Gluten free diets and triathlon training.
The problem with gluten free foods is this:
(I got this off of a webiste recommended and these were the recipes listed.)
•Chocolate and Oatmeal Cookies
•Sandwich Bread
•Cast Iron Skillet Pizza
•Artisan Gluten-Free Flour Blend
•Pretzels
•Mozzarella Sticks
•Chicken Korma
•Potato Lasagna
•Crepes
•Challah
•Waffles
•Shanghai Street Dumplings
•Tortillas
•Caramel Apples
•Pumpkin Muffins

Look at that list! Most people who go gluten free end up eating high sugar and high fat foods that are not even close to nutrient dense.
It is not an issue to be gluten free. One of my gf's best friends just did the 70.3 in Racine and she has celiac disease. She is perfectly fine, she just knows how to control it. Just be careful when you read labels that say gluten free. The FDA is actually about to change the products that can be considered gluten free, due to the high sugar and fat contents of certain foods.
2013-08-03 3:40 PM
in reply to: Chicagobrah

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Kansas
Subject: RE: Gluten free diets and triathlon training.

Originally posted by Chicagobrah

The FDA is actually about to change the products that can be considered gluten free, due to the high sugar and fat contents of certain foods.

The FDA just announced yesterday new regulations for food items labeled gluten free, but it was not because of high sugar and fat contents. It's because prior, there were absolutely no regulations for the GF label and now the standard is clearly defined at less than 20 parts per million.

2013-08-03 4:21 PM
in reply to: lisac957

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Champion
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New York, NY
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Subject: RE: Gluten free diets and triathlon training.
Originally posted by lisac957

Originally posted by Chicagobrah

The FDA is actually about to change the products that can be considered gluten free, due to the high sugar and fat contents of certain foods.

The FDA just announced yesterday new regulations for food items labeled gluten free, but it was not because of high sugar and fat contents. It's because prior, there were absolutely no regulations for the GF label and now the standard is clearly defined at less than 20 parts per million.




^^^this
companies have a year to comply and the regulation is specifically to help celiacs.

There is NOTHING inherently healthier about gluten free. If I did not have clear medical advantages I would be back eating whole grains in a heartbeat
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