How to Train for Sprints after Just Racing an Olympic

author : jtriathlete
comments : 0

Member Question

I am finishing up with the 21 week Intermediate Olympic plan for my race this Sunday.  I then have two sprint races scheduled each a month apart and then another Olympic (5i50) two months after that.  My question is, what is my best plan for training the next two months for the sprints?  I'm feeling pretty strong coming off of the olympic plan.  

Answer by Jim Hallberg
D3 Multisports.com

I assume that the olympic 5150 in September is of top priority and an A-race? I also assume you are healthy and strong with good if not great fitness.

If this is correct, after the olympic I would use a two week cycle or three week cycle with the 3rd week the same or a touch more volume just NO INTERVALS or anything beyond a zone three (your rest week).

I would use the next two months as training not only for speed but also power. You can keep the routines very similar to the last plan maintaining some good volume.

SWIM

For the swim, I would get more recovery and really push the pace up in the form of fast 50's and 100's - way beyond race pace, with good recovery. This workout would be once a week.

BIKE

For the bike, once a week, I would do short, faster, powerful intervals shifting 1-2 gears harder than normal cadence but no lower than 70, ideally around 75, and really push hard for anywhere between 30sec to 1min and up to 3min long.

This workout would be 3x30sec all out (with 3min rest between) 3x1min (all out) 4-5min recovery, and 3x3min all out (with 5-8min recovery) and then back down again starting week 4. Repeat once a week on flat or slight up hills but it has to be nearly all out episodes. 

When you go do these you will think no big deal for the first few, but then you'll get it, and realize if done right its not many intervals but they are tough. It's a fun and rewarding workout especially when it comes time to race, but you must race like you train.

This workout is once a week. with good recovery and rest going into the workout and even after this workout for at least a full 36hrs if not longer. 

Here's what it could look like:

Week 1 (3x30, 3x1min, 3x3min)

Week 2 (3x30, 3x1min, 3x3min)

Week 3 is the same volume with no intensity (rest week)

Week 4 is (3x30sec, 3x1min, 3x3min) then back down with 3x1min, and 3x30sec to finish it up. 

These intervals are strong and powerful efforts, very hard and very fast, cadence is lower to build muscular power and strength.

RUN

Your run I would hit two forms, one: a long run that mixes in some 1 mile efforts or 2x15minutes with 5 minutes recovery for the 1st week. 4min recovery for the 2nd week, 3min recovery for the 3rd week and 2min recovery 4th week etc etc.

And the second run would be a progression of 400's with equal work to rest, or slightly shorter rest if possible. One week might be 6x400's, then 8x400's, then 10x400's

Rest weeks would come in the form of NOT doing these all out, but reduce some intensity and the number of intervals, with a slight reduction in total volume for the week of your sprint races, and then get back on it after the races. then more of a reduction for your olympic. Staying healthy, and reducing volume and intervals 10 days out.

I hope this might be of some benefit to you, have fun and train safe.

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date: June 28, 2012

Author


jtriathlete

Some athletes spend too much time focusing solely on their strengths or just on their weaknesses. As a coach I believe you should work on both. Your strengths can give you a competitive edge in one or more of the disciplines but spend an inordinate amount of time on them and you can forgo progress in other areas. Not enough time and you’ll see them diminish. Same with your weaknesses, but together we’ll build a plan to balance the two and make you the best overall athlete you can be!

Author

avatarjtriathlete

Some athletes spend too much time focusing solely on their strengths or just on their weaknesses. As a coach I believe you should work on both. Your strengths can give you a competitive edge in one or more of the disciplines but spend an inordinate amount of time on them and you can forgo progress in other areas. Not enough time and you’ll see them diminish. Same with your weaknesses, but together we’ll build a plan to balance the two and make you the best overall athlete you can be!

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