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2013-01-27 10:09 PM

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Subject: Core Workouts - Strength Training

Hi,

I do cardio twice a day, normally 5k / 10k run at lunch then a spin class in the evenings or 1500m swim at lunch followed by either a run or spin class in the evening.  At the weekends I do a 20-40 mile bike ride.  Sunday is used as a recovery day. I eat well and have a well balanced calorie controlled diet.

So, i'm active and feel that i am putting in plenty cardio and have no issues competing in sprints but i'm getting bored with the same old same old routines.  I'm looking to mix it up by adding in some strength training.  I'm just looking to tone up a little and drop some excess body fat and hopefully in the process improve my leg power on the bike and improve my swim times.  I don't want to add massive muscle mass.

I'm one of these guys who can't remember anything so i need a notebook to guide me along... but what the hell do i put in the notebook, what workouts should i be doing?  It's find writing it all down but what should i be doing and how many reps etc etc

Can anyone recommend whjat i should be doing or advise a good pocket book that i can use or point me to a good website where i can download some guides? 



2013-01-28 12:53 AM
in reply to: #4597184

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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training

Careful asking this question on a triathlon board as frankly very few triathletes know the first thing about strength training.

Also, make sure strength training is something you really want to add. Strength training takes considerable amounts of time to recover from, will add lean mass (read: make you heavier), and in the short term will not make you a better triathlete. What it will do for you is strengthen bones/tendons/structure making you less injury prone, add lean mass (read: look better naked), and increase resting metabolism (lose extra body fat).

Any program you use should include the "big lifts" if you want more strength and a stronger core. Big lifts are squats, deadlifts,bench press, overhead press. Power cleans are useful as well but you would likely need a coach to learn them. Good ancillary excercises are dips and chin ups. You should be doing these with large amounts of weight reps of 4-6 sets 3-5. The idea that high reps low weights doesn't add bulks has contributed to a lot of ineffective programs and weak people wasting time.

And for general knoweledge of the group; core workouts does not mean doing 1000 situps and doing crazy motion on balance balls. The abdominals=core and the abdominals work isometrically to protect the spine and maintain its rigidity and integrity. "big lifts" and heavy weights will force your core to maintain stabilization, thus training your abdominals in the manner consistent with function.

2013-01-28 6:46 AM
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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training

No disrespect intended toward the previous poster, but I disagree with much of what he said.

Strength training will not add any additional muscle mass/weight unless you're eating an excess of calories to give your body the raw material it needs to build that mass.  If done correctly, it also doesn't take any longer for recovery than s/b/r training.

Big lifts can be fun, but if your primary goal is better triathlon performance, there are more effective ways to spend your time in the gym.

I do agree that it appears, at least anecdotally, to reduce injury risk, and that it will not make you faster directly in the short term.  I also agree that high rep/low weight is mostly a waste of time for triathletes.

A strength program that focuses on balance, core strength, stabilization, and correcting/avoiding imbalances caused by hours of s/b/r is more effective at supporting better long term triathon performance.  It will also provide the variety that you seem to be looking for.

Here are some examples of what strength training programs for triathletes should look like, IMO:

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFxUUxc41f00rycJ1XzS9hkH-I_qfA2O3

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFxUUxc41f01uKYlX8KvYel98jCYsUiOm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HuAKD9PrLk4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p1yssOjFKtg

 



Edited by TriMyBest 2013-01-28 6:54 AM
2013-01-28 10:37 AM
in reply to: #4597184

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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training

There is no better core, stabilization, balance exercise than a squat. Also the body performs three basic strength related functions. Leg/hip drive, it presses, and it pulls. The body is very used to performing these functions as a whole, using the correct ratio of each muscle, and any proper training program will use that fact as its foundation for building exercises.

The one thing i agree on is the use of the single leg drills specifically for triathlon. '

Lastly I do not think there is any s/b/r that can equal the recovery time required after a heavy day of deadlifting and I do not think anyone would question that you cannot strength train 5x a week like you can s/b/r.

2013-01-28 7:20 PM
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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training
jordanshadow - 2013-01-28 11:37 AM

There is no better core, stabilization, balance exercise than a squat. Also the body performs three basic strength related functions. Leg/hip drive, it presses, and it pulls. The body is very used to performing these functions as a whole, using the correct ratio of each muscle, and any proper training program will use that fact as its foundation for building exercises.

The one thing i agree on is the use of the single leg drills specifically for triathlon. '

Lastly I do not think there is any s/b/r that can equal the recovery time required after a heavy day of deadlifting and I do not think anyone would question that you cannot strength train 5x a week like you can s/b/r.

There are many exercises that are more effective for accomplishing those goals than squats.  For starters, simple planks come to mind as a superior core exercise.  TRX suspension training is much more effective for developing stabilizer muscles than squats, and almost any exercise with a BOSU or stability ball is going to be better for developing balance. 

How is a long recovery time desirable?  If you're not recovered enough in 48-72 hours to repeat a training session, you over did it, and will not make the gains that you're capable of, regardless of your goals.  This is true for both strength and endurance training.

It's definitely possible to strength train 5 or more times a week.  It's necessary to have a well-designed split routine, and it's also partially dependent on the person's experience level, goals, and current training focus.  All the serious competetive amateur and pro body builders I know train that frequently.

 

 

 



Edited by TriMyBest 2013-01-28 7:22 PM
2013-01-28 7:52 PM
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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training

Current exercise research would refute that nearly any bosu excercise will increase your functional  stability/blanace more than simply performing the activity by itself. Stability comes primarily from the abdomen muscles and it would make since that to improve stability one would need to train those muscles. A functional exercise uses the muscles in the pattern that they will be utilized in their sport. Squats/Deadlifts cause isometric contraction of the abdominal muscles when things get heavy to protect the spine and allow for optimal transmission of force upward. Adding instability or a bosu ball just makes you better at standing on a bosu ball. Im not familiar with the trx suspension training but imo its hard to replicate putting something really heavy on your back and forcing you to balance/stabilize. Point being squats are gold standard in the strength world for a reason.

Long recovery as you mention is not desirable and that is why I listed it as a negative to the op. But the nature of deadlifts and the extreme neuromuscular fatigue and hormonal response they elicit provide a high degree of stimulus that cannot be recovered from in 48 hours when it gets heavy. This is quite negative but this exercise is so useful that it is willing to work around the weaknesses.

Finally, I guess your right that you could perform a split routine and work 5 days. I was in the mindset of total body workouts. Like the aformentioned pro body builders, they are mostly looking for swollen muscles and to train for aesthetics and not function. A competitive power lifter/olympic lifter however will often workout 3 days a week or a 4day split because they know that to become strong you need to work with heavy weight, and rest hard.

 

 



2013-01-28 8:32 PM
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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training
jordanshadow - 2013-01-28 7:52 PM

Current exercise research would refute that nearly any bosu excercise will increase your functional  stability/blanace more than simply performing the activity by itself. Stability comes primarily from the abdomen muscles and it would make since that to improve stability one would need to train those muscles. A functional exercise uses the muscles in the pattern that they will be utilized in their sport. Squats/Deadlifts cause isometric contraction of the abdominal muscles when things get heavy to protect the spine and allow for optimal transmission of force upward. Adding instability or a bosu ball just makes you better at standing on a bosu ball. Im not familiar with the trx suspension training but imo its hard to replicate putting something really heavy on your back and forcing you to balance/stabilize. Point being squats are gold standard in the strength world for a reason.

Long recovery as you mention is not desirable and that is why I listed it as a negative to the op. But the nature of deadlifts and the extreme neuromuscular fatigue and hormonal response they elicit provide a high degree of stimulus that cannot be recovered from in 48 hours when it gets heavy. This is quite negative but this exercise is so useful that it is willing to work around the weaknesses.

Finally, I guess your right that you could perform a split routine and work 5 days. I was in the mindset of total body workouts. Like the aformentioned pro body builders, they are mostly looking for swollen muscles and to train for aesthetics and not function. A competitive power lifter/olympic lifter however will often workout 3 days a week or a 4day split because they know that to become strong you need to work with heavy weight, and rest hard.

 

 

 

^^^ agreed completely.  It's better to stand on a stable platform and lift a crapload of weight (less stability); then to lift a pink dumbell and stand on a bosu ball.  

Farmers / waiter walks, deadlifts, etc. will add a lot more stability work then working with a bosu ball.  Plus, it looks way cooler.

And also agreed that you can't strength train more then 3-4 times a week, if you are indeed strength training.  Again, lifting light weights with endless reps doesn't count, but then again that doesn't count as strength training! 

2013-01-29 5:16 AM
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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training
I think we're having two different conversations at this point, because I never said anything about weight lifting on a bosu. I mentioned using a bosu as one option for balance exercises. I agree 100% that heavy lifts should always be performed on a stable surface. About strength training 5+ days per week, we're just going to have a differing opinion on that. I spend about 50 hours a week in a gym, so I see how frequently and how long people train. The average person shouldn't do strength training more than 4, but many advanced body builders are doing 5+. BTW, I live in a powerlifting and bodybuilding hot spot - York, PA - so it's possible my perspective is a little skewed due to the large number of lifelong serious lifters I encounter.
2013-01-29 1:37 PM
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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training
jordanshadow - 2013-01-28 8:52 PM

Current exercise research would refute that nearly any bosu excercise will increase your functional  stability/blanace more than simply performing the activity by itself. Stability comes primarily from the abdomen muscles and it would make since that to improve stability one would need to train those muscles. A functional exercise uses the muscles in the pattern that they will be utilized in their sport. Squats/Deadlifts cause isometric contraction of the abdominal muscles when things get heavy to protect the spine and allow for optimal transmission of force upward. Adding instability or a bosu ball just makes you better at standing on a bosu ball. Im not familiar with the trx suspension training but imo its hard to replicate putting something really heavy on your back and forcing you to balance/stabilize. Point being squats are gold standard in the strength world for a reason.

 

I would be curious to know where you found research that says that adding instability to your workouts will not help you be more stable.  

You're partially correct (see next paragraph) when you say that stability comes from the core, but what would make you think that balancing on a bosu or even on one leg on the floor doesn't challenge your core?

Also, stability doesn't come exclusively from the core.  All the small muscles and connective tissues that support the joint areas like ankle, knee, hip also help in stabilizing the body.  Instability work on a bosu, one leg, etc. will challenge those areas also.

Lastly, you speak of functionality.  Functionality = real world movements.  In the real world, how often are we met with an unstable environment, for example an unlevel sidewalk while carrying groceries?  In the real world, life is often not stable.  Training strictly with your feet flat on solid ground does not simulate reality well.  Skipping instability training is cheating yourself.

2013-01-29 5:53 PM
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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training
noelle1230 - 2013-01-29 1:37 PM
jordanshadow - 2013-01-28 8:52 PM

Current exercise research would refute that nearly any bosu excercise will increase your functional  stability/blanace more than simply performing the activity by itself. Stability comes primarily from the abdomen muscles and it would make since that to improve stability one would need to train those muscles. A functional exercise uses the muscles in the pattern that they will be utilized in their sport. Squats/Deadlifts cause isometric contraction of the abdominal muscles when things get heavy to protect the spine and allow for optimal transmission of force upward. Adding instability or a bosu ball just makes you better at standing on a bosu ball. Im not familiar with the trx suspension training but imo its hard to replicate putting something really heavy on your back and forcing you to balance/stabilize. Point being squats are gold standard in the strength world for a reason.

 

I would be curious to know where you found research that says that adding instability to your workouts will not help you be more stable.  

You're partially correct (see next paragraph) when you say that stability comes from the core, but what would make you think that balancing on a bosu or even on one leg on the floor doesn't challenge your core?

Also, stability doesn't come exclusively from the core.  All the small muscles and connective tissues that support the joint areas like ankle, knee, hip also help in stabilizing the body.  Instability work on a bosu, one leg, etc. will challenge those areas also.

Lastly, you speak of functionality.  Functionality = real world movements.  In the real world, how often are we met with an unstable environment, for example an unlevel sidewalk while carrying groceries?  In the real world, life is often not stable.  Training strictly with your feet flat on solid ground does not simulate reality well.  Skipping instability training is cheating yourself.

Here's a book that has years of research of how instability training is really not effective.  There's also a study here, here & an article here

Unless your tightrope walking everywhere; your walking on a stable surface everywhere you go.  Even that sidewalk that is on an angle, it's still a stable sidewalk that just happens to not be level.  

Training with your feet flat on the ground does 2 things.  First, it lets you have a better footing which will let you lift as much weight as you possibly can without hurting yourself.  That, in turn, will work all the stabilizing joints you mention along with your core.  If you haven't tried it, get in a  solid, heavy day of lifting including the big 3 - deadlifts, squats, benches - along with supplemental work like farmer & waiter carries and tell me if your abs and all other joints aren't sore for a day or so afterward.  

The bosu & stability ball do have a purpose; for what they were originally designed for.  They were created for stroke and neuromuscular developmental rehab.  So, if your recovering from an injury or have ankle/knee mobility issues, it may benefit.  But for most healthy folks, I don't see the value and don't have any clients perform them. 

2013-01-29 7:22 PM
in reply to: #4597184

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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training

tzcoaching has hit the nail on the head. Bosu balls and instability is mostly a current fad that will fade away in time like so many of the useless pieces of equipment in a gym. Progressive weight training adds a large degree of instability, not by altering the floor, but rather by putting something heavy in your hands and telling your body to stay upright through motion. Exactly as tzcoaching says, try a day of heavy lifting and tell me all those stabilizers from from your neck to your toes don't feel it!

The poor strength world has just been trashed with misconceptions and bad ideas with good marketing for years. Look to the guys that got strong, there is no magic secret. All of them lifted a great deal of free weight.



2013-01-30 10:58 AM
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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training
tzcoaching - 2013-01-29 6:53 PM
noelle1230 - 2013-01-29 1:37 PM
jordanshadow - 2013-01-28 8:52 PM

Current exercise research would refute that nearly any bosu excercise will increase your functional  stability/blanace more than simply performing the activity by itself. Stability comes primarily from the abdomen muscles and it would make since that to improve stability one would need to train those muscles. A functional exercise uses the muscles in the pattern that they will be utilized in their sport. Squats/Deadlifts cause isometric contraction of the abdominal muscles when things get heavy to protect the spine and allow for optimal transmission of force upward. Adding instability or a bosu ball just makes you better at standing on a bosu ball. Im not familiar with the trx suspension training but imo its hard to replicate putting something really heavy on your back and forcing you to balance/stabilize. Point being squats are gold standard in the strength world for a reason.

 

I would be curious to know where you found research that says that adding instability to your workouts will not help you be more stable.  

You're partially correct (see next paragraph) when you say that stability comes from the core, but what would make you think that balancing on a bosu or even on one leg on the floor doesn't challenge your core?

Also, stability doesn't come exclusively from the core.  All the small muscles and connective tissues that support the joint areas like ankle, knee, hip also help in stabilizing the body.  Instability work on a bosu, one leg, etc. will challenge those areas also.

Lastly, you speak of functionality.  Functionality = real world movements.  In the real world, how often are we met with an unstable environment, for example an unlevel sidewalk while carrying groceries?  In the real world, life is often not stable.  Training strictly with your feet flat on solid ground does not simulate reality well.  Skipping instability training is cheating yourself.

Here's a book that has years of research of how instability training is really not effective.  There's also a study here, here & an article here

Unless your tightrope walking everywhere; your walking on a stable surface everywhere you go.  Even that sidewalk that is on an angle, it's still a stable sidewalk that just happens to not be level.  

Training with your feet flat on the ground does 2 things.  First, it lets you have a better footing which will let you lift as much weight as you possibly can without hurting yourself.  That, in turn, will work all the stabilizing joints you mention along with your core.  If you haven't tried it, get in a  solid, heavy day of lifting including the big 3 - deadlifts, squats, benches - along with supplemental work like farmer & waiter carries and tell me if your abs and all other joints aren't sore for a day or so afterward.  

The bosu & stability ball do have a purpose; for what they were originally designed for.  They were created for stroke and neuromuscular developmental rehab.  So, if your recovering from an injury or have ankle/knee mobility issues, it may benefit.  But for most healthy folks, I don't see the value and don't have any clients perform them. 

The book is about 5 years old and since then most of the claims there have been refuted.

As for the studies, if you just google the words "stability training" you will find 10 studies that support it's value to every one that doesn't.

I really must disagree with you on this.  Do you really think that someone carrying a load, like groceries, walking through a parking lot and unknowingly stepping in a pothole would not benefit and avoid tripping/twisting an ankle if he or she had some experience with instability training?  This is how injury is prevented out in the real world.

For example, a client of mine continued to roll his ankle when playing basketball.  Sure, it's a stable surface, but certain movements we do everyday--especially in sport--cause us to become unstable.  The ligaments holding his ankle together just kept failing.  I had him start doing instability training and after a few months he stopped rolling the ankle.  I challenged those ligaments and propreoceptive nerves in a way that his "flat ground" training wasn't.  Now they function better when he steps wrong while running the court, or twists in a way in which his body is unstable to make a quick move.

Life and especially sport related activity is totally unstable!  I can't believe anyone would think otherwise.  Check out the gym of any major league sport these days.  It's full of stability balls, bosu's and the like.  These are the highest paid trainers in the country and they're on board with it.

Instability training is most certainly not a fad.  People have been using balance boards, one-legged training, etc. for decades.  A stability ball or bosu may be a new tool but the concept is as old as training itself.

Lastly, like another poster said, no one is suggesting you but up a ton of load will on a bosu.  I'm also not suggesting you abandon training with heavier load on flat ground.  No one is saying that every second of training should be done with instability but stability training definitely has its place and has been proven to help in injury prevention.

2013-01-30 11:14 AM
in reply to: #4600356

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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training
tzcoaching - 2013-01-29 6:53 PM
noelle1230 - 2013-01-29 1:37 PM
jordanshadow - 2013-01-28 8:52 PM

Current exercise research would refute that nearly any bosu excercise will increase your functional  stability/blanace more than simply performing the activity by itself. Stability comes primarily from the abdomen muscles and it would make since that to improve stability one would need to train those muscles. A functional exercise uses the muscles in the pattern that they will be utilized in their sport. Squats/Deadlifts cause isometric contraction of the abdominal muscles when things get heavy to protect the spine and allow for optimal transmission of force upward. Adding instability or a bosu ball just makes you better at standing on a bosu ball. Im not familiar with the trx suspension training but imo its hard to replicate putting something really heavy on your back and forcing you to balance/stabilize. Point being squats are gold standard in the strength world for a reason.

 

I would be curious to know where you found research that says that adding instability to your workouts will not help you be more stable.  

You're partially correct (see next paragraph) when you say that stability comes from the core, but what would make you think that balancing on a bosu or even on one leg on the floor doesn't challenge your core?

Also, stability doesn't come exclusively from the core.  All the small muscles and connective tissues that support the joint areas like ankle, knee, hip also help in stabilizing the body.  Instability work on a bosu, one leg, etc. will challenge those areas also.

Lastly, you speak of functionality.  Functionality = real world movements.  In the real world, how often are we met with an unstable environment, for example an unlevel sidewalk while carrying groceries?  In the real world, life is often not stable.  Training strictly with your feet flat on solid ground does not simulate reality well.  Skipping instability training is cheating yourself.

Here's a book that has years of research of how instability training is really not effective.  There's also a study here, here & an article here

Unless your tightrope walking everywhere; your walking on a stable surface everywhere you go.  Even that sidewalk that is on an angle, it's still a stable sidewalk that just happens to not be level.  

Training with your feet flat on the ground does 2 things.  First, it lets you have a better footing which will let you lift as much weight as you possibly can without hurting yourself.  That, in turn, will work all the stabilizing joints you mention along with your core.  If you haven't tried it, get in a  solid, heavy day of lifting including the big 3 - deadlifts, squats, benches - along with supplemental work like farmer & waiter carries and tell me if your abs and all other joints aren't sore for a day or so afterward.  

The bosu & stability ball do have a purpose; for what they were originally designed for.  They were created for stroke and neuromuscular developmental rehab.  So, if your recovering from an injury or have ankle/knee mobility issues, it may benefit.  But for most healthy folks, I don't see the value and don't have any clients perform them. 

I also wanted to add that I've been strength training for many years, and often with quite heavy weight proportionate to my body weight.  After awhile, no.......deadlifts, squats, etc. no longer challenged my core even as I added more and more load.

Then I started doing similar movements but with lighter weight/body weight only adding in instability like one legged, balance board, bosu.  THEN, my core muscle felt sore again for the first time in a long time.

You have to continue to find new ways to challenge the body.  It acclimates, then your gains stop.  Adding instability is just another way to add a level of difficulty to your training when plain old two feet firmly planted doesn't do much for you anymore.

2013-01-30 6:52 PM
in reply to: #4597184

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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training

Other then "Dr. Google" is there actual research you can provide to support your claims? 

I googled "stability training" like you suggested, and the first search that comes up is a Mens Health article referencing the exact book I already copied here.  So, at least main stream media is starting to catch up to the gimicks that is marketing in health & conditioning. 

 Eric Cressey is one of the leading S&C coaches in the country;he also wrote that book. 

 You talk about someone carrying a bag of groceries; YES, thats exactly the same thing as farmer carries which I already alluded to. Again, unless your walking on a tightrope when carrying those groceries, your still on a stable platform.

 

A reason people get injured when they step into that pothole is because lack of mobility, so something has to "give" or break.  Strength and mobility are 2 different animals.

But to say that "stability" training by your definition will correct this is completely incorrect.  In fact, I think it only goes to further make people have LESS range of motion because they are trying to balance themselves on whatever unstable platform they are training on. 

If you failed to make any more gains with the basics, it could be simply due to poor program design.  Just because it didn't "burn" anymore doesn't mean things aren't effective.  Take a shake-weight for 30 min and tell me if it burns or not; does that mean its really making you stronger?  Probably not.  

I guess you're right, we'll have to agree to disagree.

2013-01-31 10:07 AM
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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training

Yikes.  Interesting.  I like science, but I also like listening to the top guys in the industry.  When you're talking strength it's people like John Meadows and the like.  Heavy squats and heavy deads are what most strength coaches and even bb'ing prep coaches I know prescribe for core strength. 

 

That said it isn't the best way for an endurance athlete to go about it IMO. 

2013-01-31 11:50 AM
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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training
tzcoaching - 2013-01-30 7:52 PM

Other then "Dr. Google" is there actual research you can provide to support your claims? 

I googled "stability training" like you suggested, and the first search that comes up is a Mens Health article referencing the exact book I already copied here.  So, at least main stream media is starting to catch up to the gimicks that is marketing in health & conditioning. 

 Eric Cressey is one of the leading S&C coaches in the country;he also wrote that book. 

 You talk about someone carrying a bag of groceries; YES, thats exactly the same thing as farmer carries which I already alluded to. Again, unless your walking on a tightrope when carrying those groceries, your still on a stable platform.

 

A reason people get injured when they step into that pothole is because lack of mobility, so something has to "give" or break.  Strength and mobility are 2 different animals.

But to say that "stability" training by your definition will correct this is completely incorrect.  In fact, I think it only goes to further make people have LESS range of motion because they are trying to balance themselves on whatever unstable platform they are training on. 

If you failed to make any more gains with the basics, it could be simply due to poor program design.  Just because it didn't "burn" anymore doesn't mean things aren't effective.  Take a shake-weight for 30 min and tell me if it burns or not; does that mean its really making you stronger?  Probably not.  

I guess you're right, we'll have to agree to disagree.

The OP was originally referring to core strength and stability so here are two research studies that show how instability training is superior to traditional "stable" core exercises:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20436242

http://www.wellsphere.com/exercise-article/stability-ball-research/515146

 

And here's one that addresses instability and overall muscle activation:

http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/instability-increases-core-activation

 

Research studies aside, I work for one of the largest and best staffed gyms in the country.  Our programs are run by some of the most highly regarded fitness professionals in the industry.  They are not just researchers; they are putting the research into practice and passing their knowledge on to us to facilitate our programming.  They believe in the benefits of the stability ball, bosu and other instability devices and we use them frequently with clients and classes.  I trust these people, they are at the forefront of our industry.



2013-01-31 12:46 PM
in reply to: #4597184

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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training

Yep agreed.  We did get off on a tangent regarding stability vs strength training, but the original post is asking about a strength routine: " I'm just looking to tone up a little and drop some excess body fat and hopefully in the process improve my leg power on the bike and improve my swim times.  I don't want to add massive muscle mass".

For core work; yes, I can see how some stability work on a stability ball could help; and in fact do some myself (stirring the pot anyone?)

But even for core work; I prefer something that puts torque, into a stable platform - enter the  Pallof Press:

 

 

Simply because too many people butcher the work on the stability ball and end up with more back problems then not.  Or, they end up activating the hamstrings more then anything to balance on the ball, and not their core.  Plus, the pallof allows for various angles to work the core / trunk. 

So, yep, agreed that stability works for some core work.  No, do not agree that it works for strength or to help prevent injuries / increase mobility.

If you want to get strong, there's no better way then to just lift heavy.  This even goes for endurance athletes. 

2013-02-05 12:06 PM
in reply to: #4597184

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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training

I was thinking about this thread last night as I taught my 30 minute Monday night Core class.  There's a set we do often seated on the mat with legs up, balancing on sits bones in a V shape.  Once in this position, you can add difficulty by extending and lowering the legs while also lowering the upper body, then pulling back up to a V shape.  We call them V-ups.

Yesterday I had the class do them on the soft side of the BOSU.  On the floor, it usually takes about 16-24 reps for them to start groaning and really feeling the core working.

On the BOSU, they started feeling them after only about 8 reps.  They were shocked how much harder it was on the abs and low back sitting on the BOSU than it is on the floor.

Take really any core exercise and count how many reps you can do before your abs get that burned out feeling.  Now do that same exercise incorporating either a stability ball, balance disk, BOSU, etc.  You will feel how instability adds a level of challenge you don't get from the flat old floor!

2013-02-07 5:59 PM
in reply to: #4597184

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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training

Ladies and Gents

 

I've been out for a few days and not had a chance to get back to my post until today.  I'm more than surprised at the level of discussion here.  It's great to see people passionate about how they train and their own views. 

 

I think it is fair to say that what works for one doesn't always work for everyone and that we all have our own training routines that we use to help us with strength, flexibility, endurance etc etc.  What i was looking for was to get ideas so that i can learn from how my own body reacts to the exercise and if it improves then i tune my workout to give me what i need. 

 

Having never exercised for strength or even heard about or looked at functional strength this is a new focus for me and something i am enjoying reading about and preparing to get into. 

I was also just given a book http://www.amazon.com/Functional-Strength-Triathletes-Ironman-Ingrid/dp/1841263443  let me know what you think.  Is it worthwhile?

 

Thank you all so much for your advice and comments, please don't stop this discussion / debate / education, it is excellent.



Edited by markyhopkins 2013-02-07 6:00 PM
2013-02-13 10:36 PM
in reply to: #4597184

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Subject: RE: Core Workouts - Strength Training
turkish get ups, that's all I got to say about that.
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