General Discussion Triathlon Talk » new areobars difficulty Rss Feed  
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2006-03-22 10:12 AM

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Regular
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Los Angeles, CA
Subject: new areobars difficulty
Wow. I just bought areobars for my road bike and tried them out yesterday. I wasn't really able to use them. Am I balancing wrong? Will I get the hang of this? Did anyone else find it really hard to ride eith them at first?

I got a kind where the pads flip up when I'm not using them. So, to put an arm in, I have to move my arm to the center and push the pad down. I can do the first one okay, but when I move my second arm to the middle and above the pad I start to swerve. And then I sort of freak out because I don't have the leverage to steer with the arm in the aerobars, so start peddaling furiously hoping the bike will straighten up. I was practicing just putting one arm in the bars, and I know I looked a little silly. (Next time I will go to an area with fewer cyclists around.)

I'm thinking of zip tying the pads down so that I can smoothly move my arms in to start with.


2006-03-22 10:22 AM
in reply to: #376437

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Subject: RE: new areobars difficulty

Yes it does take some time and practice getting in and out of aero bars.  It is not something that can be mastered over night.  However the first thing I would have to ask, is did you put them on, or did you have a bike shop do it that was able to fit you to the bars?  I had mine put on when I bought my bike and they were fitted with the rest of the bike so I don't lean too far and feel as tho I have no control when in them. 

As to trying to zip tie the pads down, that defeats the purpose of having flip-up pads in the first place, and you will loose the ability to ride on the bike in the upright position.  This is sometimes needed when climbing as well as to just stretch out your back from time to time.

2006-03-22 10:37 AM
in reply to: #376437

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Champion
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Two seat rocket plane
Subject: RE: new areobars difficulty

Personally I hated the flip-up arm pads on the first set of aerobars I got, so I went with Syntace c2's on the next pair. They have fixed pads. I did not find that I lost any hand positions on the regular drops at all. Zip tying the pads down might be a good idea until you get used to making the transition into the aerobars.

Practice, practice, practice is the best way to get over this.

Remember, you steer by leaning more than you do by turning the bars.

2006-03-22 6:52 PM
in reply to: #376437

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Michigan
Subject: RE: new areobars difficulty
Yes, it takes a while to get used to. In the beginning, I was doing exactly what you are describing - holding the handlebar with one hand and putting the other arm on the aerobar. I rode like that for a while, switching arms and trying to control the bike more and more with the arm on the aerobar and less with the arm on the handlebars.
Don't worry what people think about it. Few times like that, and you will be able to ride with both arms on the aerobars.
Good luck!
2006-03-22 8:18 PM
in reply to: #376487

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Elite
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Laurium, MI
Subject: RE: new areobars difficulty
it seems to me that your general balance is the factor, not the aero bars.  Sounds like you are using your arms on the handlebars to support your core and balance the bike.  So obviously having uneven handholds on the bars would make you swerve.  Can you ride without your hands on the bars?  Can you shift to the drops with both hands at the same time?  Do you have a death grip on the bars?  Try and ride holding the bars with as little pressure as you can.  Just cup your fingers touching your finger tip to your thumb and let the bar bounce around in your hand.  If you've ever ridden a mountain bike, it's the same grip.  If you can't comfotably do this or change hand position without feeling threatened of crashing, then you need more time in the saddle yet to develope balance.

Edited by vortmax 2006-03-22 8:22 PM
2006-03-22 9:02 PM
in reply to: #376437

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Regular
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Los Angeles, CA
Subject: RE: new areobars difficulty
I did get the aerobars put on at my LBS, and they switched out the stem to a shorter one, which I should have had all along.

You're probably right about balance. I never ride without hands. I can leave them very lightly on the bars, but I don't feel comfortable riding without hands. I guess I'll just have to practice more.

It's good to hear that there are others out there that had some difficulty with them.


2006-03-22 9:08 PM
in reply to: #377093

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Subject: RE: new areobars difficulty
vortmax - 2006-03-22 9:18 PMit seems to me that your general balance is the factor, not the aero bars.  Sounds like you are using your arms on the handlebars to support your core and balance the bike.  So obviously having uneven handholds on the bars would make you swerve.  Can you ride without your hands on the bars?  Can you shift to the drops with both hands at the same time?  Do you have a death grip on the bars?  Try and ride holding the bars with as little pressure as you can.  Just cup your fingers touching your finger tip to your thumb and let the bar bounce around in your hand.  If you've ever ridden a mountain bike, it's the same grip.  If you can't comfotably do this or change hand position without feeling threatened of crashing, then you need more time in the saddle yet to develope balance.
I agree... and in fact it might be easier to put both arms in at the same time than it is to go one at a time. That way you aren't shifting your weight at all on the bike, which may cause the swerving.
2006-03-23 2:31 PM
in reply to: #376437

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Expert
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Charlottesville, VA
Subject: RE: new areobars difficulty
It's a balance thing, for sure. I haven't had any trouble adjusting to aerobars, but my balance was getting pretty good -- I was even getting good enough to ride "hands-off" while zipping or unzipping my cycling jersey -- as opposed to a couple of years ago, when taking one hand off the bars to reach for a water bottle was an adventure.

Just follow the always useful advice of "practice, practice, practice."
2006-03-24 8:32 AM
in reply to: #376437

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Regular
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Singapore
Subject: RE: new areobars difficulty
I am having the same problem as you with the aerobar. The reason for me to get an aerobar was purely for hydration purpose. I was not able to balance with one hand off the handle bar, thus install an aerobar so that I can have the Aerodrink to hydrate myself while riding without stoping for a drink. Tried to use the aerobar and did exactly what you have just described. It has been a month since I got the aerobar. Hopefully I get to work on that balance act on the bike and start using the aerobar one day.
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General Discussion Triathlon Talk » new areobars difficulty Rss Feed