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2016-02-11 10:09 PM
in reply to: mike761

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Subject: RE: Bilateral breathing - lesson learned
I breath left most of the time. Never had a problem.


2016-02-12 10:33 AM
in reply to: #5165327

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Subject: RE: Bilateral breathing - lesson learned
In a clockwise triangular mile -I usually breathe right for the first leg (but usually every 4), bilateral to rebalance for the middle leg and however the heck I want for the last leg ;-)

In practice I breath every three- because it was beat into me in my youth.

I think one of the problems people who feel the need to breathe more have is not getting a good exhale. It's easy breathing every stroke to breathe too shallow. When I start to feel the need to breathe more I try and remember to emphasize my exhale so I'm getting more fresh air with every breath.
2016-02-12 10:52 AM
in reply to: Moonrocket

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Subject: RE: Bilateral breathing - lesson learned
Originally posted by Moonrocket

I think one of the problems people who feel the need to breathe more have is not getting a good exhale. It's easy breathing every stroke to breathe too shallow. When I start to feel the need to breathe more I try and remember to emphasize my exhale so I'm getting more fresh air with every breath.


Sure, this may be true. Or perhaps not.

But, the bottom line for BT readers is this: don't take the word of any person on this thread. Better, take a look for yourself. Look at what the fast triathletes and fast distance swimmers do. There are a bunch of very good videos available online of 800 and 1500 meter pool races. And many videos of olympic distance triathlons (also a 1500 meter swim). Look at what the fast triathletes do in those races. Because you will see that the vast majority of them breathe every right arm pull, or every left arm pull. The good ones can, of course, switch from side to side when needed. But most of the time, they breathe every single full stroke cycle.

2016-02-12 2:32 PM
in reply to: DarkSpeedWorks

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Subject: RE: Bilateral breathing - lesson learned

Originally posted by DarkSpeedWorks
Originally posted by Moonrocket I think one of the problems people who feel the need to breathe more have is not getting a good exhale. It's easy breathing every stroke to breathe too shallow. When I start to feel the need to breathe more I try and remember to emphasize my exhale so I'm getting more fresh air with every breath.
Sure, this may be true. Or perhaps not. But, the bottom line for BT readers is this: don't take the word of any person on this thread. Better, take a look for yourself. Look at what the fast triathletes and fast distance swimmers do. There are a bunch of very good videos available online of 800 and 1500 meter pool races. And many videos of olympic distance triathlons (also a 1500 meter swim). Look at what the fast triathletes do in those races. Because you will see that the vast majority of them breathe every right arm pull, or every left arm pull. The good ones can, of course, switch from side to side when needed. But most of the time, they breathe every single full stroke cycle.

 

Nice way of saying 'don't listen to anyone on this page', and then providing your own argument again in the form of 'facts'.  Well played.

 

Regardless of what anyone says on this site, myself included, just know that every single good swimmer on the entire planet has trained many hours with a balanced stroke and bilateral breathing so that the stroke they use in racing, with breathing to just one side, is faster. Those who didn't, not only aren't fast, but probably drowned. fact.

#seewhatididthere

2016-02-12 2:53 PM
in reply to: tjfry

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Subject: RE: Bilateral breathing - lesson learned
Originally posted by tjfry

Nice way of saying 'don't listen to anyone on this page', and then providing your own argument again in the form of 'facts'.  Well played.

Not at all, I am not trying to do that. I definitely do not mean to come across that way.

I am just offering a suggestion to beginners who might be somewhat bewildered by the multitude of views offered here. Because, if I was a beginner, I would be wondering, who/what in the heck is right?

What I am trying to suggest is that the answer is out there and it's evidence-based. Sure, I do have my opinion, but is there a way for a beginner to figure what is right, or what seems to be the most effective for fast endurance swimming? I was just trying to offer a way for readers of this thread to do some of their own investigation, something that might help them understand the answer to this, if there is one.

In case, I think your input is helpful, and having a civil back and forth makes for a great discussion. So thanks!

2016-02-12 4:03 PM
in reply to: DarkSpeedWorks

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Subject: RE: Bilateral breathing - lesson learned

Originally posted by DarkSpeedWorks
Originally posted by tjfry Nice way of saying 'don't listen to anyone on this page', and then providing your own argument again in the form of 'facts'.  Well played.
Not at all, I am not trying to do that. I definitely do not mean to come across that way. I am just offering a suggestion to beginners who might be somewhat bewildered by the multitude of views offered here. Because, if I was a beginner, I would be wondering, who/what in the heck is right? What I am trying to suggest is that the answer is out there and it's evidence-based. Sure, I do have my opinion, but is there a way for a beginner to figure what is right, or what seems to be the most effective for fast endurance swimming? I was just trying to offer a way for readers of this thread to do some of their own investigation, something that might help them understand the answer to this, if there is one. In case, I think your input is helpful, and having a civil back and forth makes for a great discussion. So thanks!

 

Just messing with you. It's Friday, sun is out, it's 80 degrees, and I need a beer. No harm no foul. forums are designed for different views, and yours is a good one. Excuse my snark!



2016-02-12 6:13 PM
in reply to: #5166838

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Subject: RE: Bilateral breathing - lesson learned
I think it is a mistake to assume that how the best in the world race is a blueprint for beginners. It ignores the entire process that took many years and miles of swimming to get there.

Should I start my bike leg mimicking the power of a top pro?

Back to the original post- in general core strength is awesome for swimming. I love this workout- esp #6. http://www.menshealth.com/fitness/the-ultimate-medicine-ball-workou...
2016-02-13 10:07 AM
in reply to: Moonrocket

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Subject: RE: Bilateral breathing - lesson learned
Originally posted by Moonrocket

I think it is a mistake to assume that how the best in the world race is a blueprint for beginners. It ignores the entire process that took many years and miles of swimming to get there.

You are absolutely correct.
Many world class swimmers are freaks of nature and totally are unlike you, me, and most everyone on BT. So I do not say, 'look at what the best in the world do and copy them'.

What I am saying, is just look at what "fast" swimmers and triathletes do. When I say, fast, I do not mean world class swimmers. I just mean fast swimmers, ones that are very successful and ones that are probably near you. So I mean the fastest male and female distance specialists on your local masters team. And the fastest triathletes that you might see at your local triathlon. Neither of these groups are anything close to swimming at world class levels. But, in body type, they are a lot like you and me. They are successful and very quick distance swimmers. And if you look at how they breathe when they race and when they swim their fast sets, there will be an obvious common thread. That, I think, is something to learn from and, with good coaching, to emulate.

Greg @ dsw
2016-02-13 10:25 AM
in reply to: #5166892

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Subject: RE: Bilateral breathing - lesson learned
I live in Boulder- we have a whole lane of world class swimmers at my local master's ;-)
2016-02-13 12:21 PM
in reply to: Moonrocket

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Subject: RE: Bilateral breathing - lesson learned
Originally posted by Moonrocket

I live in Boulder- we have a whole lane of world class swimmers at my local master's ;-)


Ah, good point.

Well, if you're in Boulder, then study what next lane (the quick, but not world class, group) does ...


2016-02-13 4:04 PM
in reply to: DarkSpeedWorks

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Subject: RE: Bilateral breathing - lesson learned
Hey all, OP back....

This has been a very interesting discussion. Based on the discussion here, I think I may have been an outlier. My stronger core is definitely helping and my bilateral breathing is much better. My swimming feels more balanced and overall, I think I doing much better. As for my 'plank a day' challenge, I don't just do planks, I mix it up a bit with various core exercises....I just use 'plank a day' because it's catchy. (I guess that's my marketing class proving its use once again, or maybe I watched too much Mad Men or some combination thereof...)

As for racing, I'll probably go back to breathing eVery other stoke on my left (my traditional stroke)....but I think the more balanced training will pay dividends on race day. We'll see if I right about that later this summer....


2016-02-13 9:58 PM
in reply to: LarchmontTri

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Subject: RE: Bilateral breathing - lesson learned
I didn't read through it all, but bilateral breathing can help balance out a stroke apparently, as well as ensure you're comfortable breathing on both sides.

I tend to do about 50/50 in training, but during a race, or hard intervals, it's always to one side, typically my right.
2016-03-14 5:33 PM
in reply to: #5166968


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Subject: RE: Bilateral breathing - lesson learned
Having learnt to bilaterality breath.A strong core does come into it as it helps you rotate evenly using your core rather than your arms and allows you to rotate to breath.Swimming lateral breathing devolpes unevenness in rotation so one side gets use to a rotating movement on one side and uneven movement.Basically it is even hip movement using your core to rotate and propel through the water when kicking.I feel bilateral breathing makes all the difference for endurance swimming.and I can keep going for a long time.
2016-03-14 10:46 PM
in reply to: #5172012


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Subject: RE: Bilateral breathing - lesson learned
I spent over three decades swimming freestyle only breathing to the left. I was taught to breathe only to one side every two strokes as a child and never varied from that until last August. I tried to change on my own and gave up as it felt like drowning. I joined a masters swim group and moved from one swim by myself to three swims per week for the past six months and was taught how to move to bilateral breathing. It was such a drastic change that once I stopped feeling like I was drowning for the first time in decades , It forced me out of a rut and helped me out of a lot of habits which has really helped me to learn lots of ways to improve my stroke, almost all of which I couldn't change before. I revert back to single sided for sprint laps but I can tell where my swim fitness is at wpby whether I need to change to single sided breathing for fast laps or not. So, a couple of benefits from my point of view
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