General Discussion Triathlon Talk » To repair bike or not? Rss Feed  
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2017-05-11 9:47 PM


12

, Texas
Subject: To repair bike or not?
I have been given an old bike- womens Trek 700 (from 1993/1994) that has been barely ridden and stored in a garage.

The bike has brand new, tubeless tires. The bike went to a repair shop last summer, and needs all new tubing and brake pads at minimum. I have almost no skill with bikes, but am confident I could figure out how to install new tubing and brake pads on the bike. I figured I can get it working well enough for under $100 since its got newish tires. The bike may need more work, but I know that nothing on it has seized. I would like to get a new seat, since the one on it hurts for me to sit on.

My hopes for the bike are to get me through one to three sprint triathlons until I can figure out if this sport is for me or not. I know I love biking, so I do want to buy a bike trainer just to be able to bike (because I am not comfortable riding on the streets by myself) but I have no idea if this bike will work out or not. The frame itself seems quite heavy from what I understand (at 29.6 lbs).

I did find a page that holds the bike statistics - https://www.bicyclebluebook.com/SearchListingDetail.aspx?id=13115&ma...

Here are the tubing and brake sets I think I would install, I saw in an older post on here that someone else installed them - https://bicyclewarehouse.com/collections/cables/products/cableset-ja...

I thought about buying a used bike, but at minimum it seems I would spend $400. I am hesitant to buy a different road bike, when I have no clue what bike I want. I feel as though if I buy a used road bike, there is a big chance in a year or two I would want to buy another bike. I feel as though I should keep with the bike I have right now even though it's a heavy bike.

Any advice would be great!


2017-05-12 7:29 AM
in reply to: sail

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Extreme Veteran
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Sidney, Ohio
Subject: RE: To repair bike or not?
I think you would do fine on the Trek. I started with a big box store bike that weighed a ton and somehow made it through several races. From there I was given a decent frame and built that bike from the ground up for maybe $500. I started out with no clue as to how to work on a bike but after multiple YouTube videos I made my way through and had a bike that would get me through several HIM. Finally after several years and realizing this hobby was not going to be a short endeavor I went all in on a true tri-bike. Either way, enjoy the time training!
2017-05-12 7:41 AM
in reply to: sail

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Greenwood, South Carolina
Subject: RE: To repair bike or not?

I started off with a road bike I purchased off of Craig's List for $200. Passed a lot of expensive bikes in my first two years or racing. I didn't purchase my Tri bike until year three of racing.

You can find a lot of Youtube videos on repairing bike but also recommend taking to local bike shop for complete tune up. They can give you an idea of the bike is the correct size for you.

Check out Cobb saddles if you want to purchase a new seat.
2017-05-12 9:10 AM
in reply to: sail

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Champion
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Tacoma, Washington
Subject: RE: To repair bike or not?

I've been very pleased with the Jagwire Universal cable/housing kits I've used. The only issue that's come up for me is that, for disc brake set-ups (which won't be a problem for you), I've had to use the XL sets (for tandems), as the standard kit doesn't have enough housing to make the full run to the rear brake after setting up the front.

As for the Trek, there's no reason it won't serve you well. I might suggest opening up the bearings and re-greasing, as it may have dried and caked in there. Enjoy the ride.

2017-05-12 10:53 AM
in reply to: sail

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Pro
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, New Hampshire
Subject: RE: To repair bike or not?
Since it has been stored for quite some time and barely ridden, expect to have brake pads, tires, tubes, chain, cables/housing plus bar tape replaced. The cassette and chain rings should be fine, but there's a risk those need to be replaced as well. Most of the time, bearings in wheels, rear derailed, bottom bracket and headset will be ok, but needs to be taken apart and re-lubed.

All in all, if you do this yourself, expect to spend about $200 in parts (assuming you have the tools already). If you ask a shop to do it, expect about $100-200 in labor.

You really need to think about is this "free" bike worth the investment or can you get a newer (and potentially quite a bit better) bike for the same amount of money.
2017-05-12 11:52 AM
in reply to: sail


699
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Subject: RE: To repair bike or not?
If you have a Trek store near you, check out their website.
They offer maintenance classes at the ones near me.
Basic: How to change a tire/basic gear change tuneup, break adjustment
Intermediate: Cables and covers/ wheel aligning (sorta)

They might even use your bike for a demo. That's what happened when I went. Some guy got his done for free...and learned how to do it at the same time. We did take up a small collection and I ran out and got them a Panera gift cert. I think they kinda just see what people need done//want to learn and go from there.

Maybe that's just the franchisee near me. Seems to me they're taking some business away. But a great way to get me to go spend money with them and have them fix anything I don't know how to....or simply don't want to do.



2017-05-12 12:49 PM
in reply to: audiojan

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Expert
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Floriduh
Subject: RE: To repair bike or not?
As a shade tree bike mechanic myself, the work that you are proposing may turn a bit complicated especially without correct tools and a bike stand. Because you are talking about parts that are not very expensive, taking it to a bike ship might not cost much and save you a lot of frustration.

Also, this is spot on.
Originally posted by audiojan
You really need to think about is this "free" bike worth the investment or can you get a newer (and potentially quite a bit better) bike for the same amount of money.
2017-05-12 5:03 PM
in reply to: audiojan

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Veteran
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Southampton, Ontario
Subject: RE: To repair bike or not?
Originally posted by audiojan

Since it has been stored for quite some time and barely ridden, expect to have brake pads, tires, tubes, chain, cables/housing plus bar tape replaced. The cassette and chain rings should be fine, but there's a risk those need to be replaced as well. Most of the time, bearings in wheels, rear derailed, bottom bracket and headset will be ok, but needs to be taken apart and re-lubed.

All in all, if you do this yourself, expect to spend about $200 in parts (assuming you have the tools already). If you ask a shop to do it, expect about $100-200 in labor.

You really need to think about is this "free" bike worth the investment or can you get a newer (and potentially quite a bit better) bike for the same amount of money.


I would bring it into a shop and ask for a full estimate, it very well could need more than what its worth or it might just need new cables and pads which are cheap. I would get the cables done at the shop but the brake pads you should be able to do yourself. Also look to invest in a couple of tools so you can change a flat or do minor adjustments if needed.
2017-05-12 7:50 PM
in reply to: 0

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233
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Ventura, California
Subject: RE: To repair bike or not?

I would take it to a bike shop and honestly just them them go through the bike. You will save yourself alot of headache and time, especially if your not mechanically inclined. 

I paid $125 to a shop when I first got my used road bike (1988 Peugeot) and the shop disassembled, cleaned and greased the bottom bracket and head stem, cleaned and adjusted all the brakes, front and rear derailers, trued the rims, installed new tubes, new bar tape, road tested the bike and detailed it for me. It was like a brand new bike when I picked it up. After the parts and labor I think it was about $170. 

I got the bike back 2 days before my first Triathlon and was able to ride it 12 miles and adjust the seat height, I then completed my first Olympic distance tri without a single problem with the bike. Totally worth the money.

I still have that 27 year old steel framed road bike and just completed my first half ironman on it. Over the course of nearly 2 years I have invested around $1,000 into it. As to whether it was worth the investment? In the long run, probably not, but it has carried me through 6 triathlons, 2 duathlons, 2 gran fondos and well over 2,000 miles of training rides and group rides with friends. 

My advice would be to take your Trek to a local bike shop, get an estimate to have them go through it and potentially invest a couple hundred dollars. Do your first couple tri's to see if you do indeed like the sport, if you don't you still got a good bike you can cruise around the local park, ride on the trainer, etc.. If you do find yourself enjoying the sport of Triathlon, you can purchase yourself a good bike that fits your needs and you can confidently sell the Trek knowing its in good working order. Or you can donate to someone less fortunate.

Best wishes.

 



Edited by rjcalhoun 2017-05-12 7:58 PM
2017-05-13 9:29 PM
in reply to: DaveL


1068
10002525
Subject: RE: To repair bike or not?
Since the bike has been stored in garage that long it is most likely that the tires have dry rotted. They may look OK at first glance, but there are most likely cracks in the side walls resulting in them failing.

This was my experience when I stored my daughters Trek 700 for 10 years. I had to get new tubes and tires so she could use it again when she decided to get back into cycling. My LBS checked it out and replaced what was needed for just the cost of the parts since I had bought 6 bikes from them over the years including this one. If I could not have gotten the bike fixed up this cheaply, I would have bought a new bike.

You can put a lot of money in an old bike to fix it up, but still have just have an old bike that may not be that reliable.
2017-05-14 9:13 AM
in reply to: #5220262


8

Subject: RE: To repair bike or not?
If it truely had little use and was garaged you may be pleasantly surprised at how little it needs. I would replace tubes, then clean and lube everything and test it before replacing anything else.

I get all my bikes and my families bikes second hand and fix them up, so Im all for going that route, however on that model, I would personally try to put as little as possible into it.

Although bearings really should be regreased on any used bike with unknown history, as long as everything spins free and isn't notchy, theres nothing that says they have to be done.

I would say do the minimum needed to get it into riding shape and ride it. If/when it needs anything "major" then you'll have to decide whether its worth putting the time and effort into that platform, vs. moving on.

Im biased though; doing my first tri in July likely on board a '90 cannondale I picked up for next to nothing. Unless I can get the old steel Giordana I picked up with it rebuilt in time.



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