General Discussion Triathlon Talk » Denver Marathon Rss Feed  
Moderators: k9car363, alicefoeller Reply
2008-06-17 9:54 AM

User image

Member
8

Pueblo, CO USA
Subject: Denver Marathon
This will be my first Marathon, if I complete my training. I would appreciate any suggestions or comments on training or just running the marathon. I have completed one 1/2 marathon in the past (December 2007). I was happy with my time but I could have prepared better. A friend talked me into running the race 10 weeks before. I have done many other shorter races (10k, 5k) with good times (PR at BolderBoulder 2008!) Thanks in advance for your help.


2008-06-17 10:16 AM
in reply to: #1471347

User image

Elite
3471
200010001001001001002525
Evergreen, CO
Subject: RE: Denver Marathon
Colfax last month was my 1st marathon.  I only got 1 20+ mile run in before the race and think I would have done better if I had gotten more of those in.  Other good advice I received was don't carbo load the night before, but do so 2 nights before; go into the race with well-rested legs; practice nutrition on your long runs; know what the race offers at aid stations if you're not carrying your own.  The usual stuff.  Good luck!!!!
2008-06-17 10:31 AM
in reply to: #1471424

User image

Member
8

Pueblo, CO USA
Subject: RE: Denver Marathon
Thanks for the info, I'm sure it will help. Do you run with your own water or rely on the aid stations. It seems there will be plenty, but you have to slow down, signal for the water (hopefully someone sees you) drink it and etc. I have a camel back that I use for biking and was planning on using that at least for training and possibly for the race. What do you think.
2008-06-17 11:10 AM
in reply to: #1471347

User image

Expert
606
500100
Lakeville, MN
Subject: RE: Denver Marathon
I got 'suckered' into doing this race too. It'll be my first mary. Should be fun.

Based on the route map, it looks like there's aid almost every mile after mile 7 or so (aid stations every 3-4 at first). A Fuel Belt might be a good addition, as you can carry Gel or "spiked" fluids (Gel+Water, Perpetuem or other long endurance supplements). I'm not sure what kind of caloric-based food they have at the event (outside of Gatorade). Water will be important, but assuming you'll be running more than 3 hours, probably going to want to add a few kCals to the tank at some point. I don't think wearing a Camelbak would be an issue, but seeing as it's a long event, stopping or slowing down to either consume or reload a smaller fuel belt may not be an issue. Personally, the less crap I carry on an event, regardless of size, the better.

Edited by cooutdoors 2008-06-17 11:11 AM
2008-06-17 11:23 AM
in reply to: #1471347

User image

Expert
671
5001002525
Colorado
Subject: RE: Denver Marathon
For a first marathon, I would recommend walking the aid stations. While this may add 5-10 seconds per mile, it ensures that you are staying hydrated and fueled which directly affects your last 6 miles.

Camelbacks have a tendancy to get very annoying after ten miles of running and can chaff pretty bad. I once had a nice smile on my lower back from my camelback. Although I didn't notice until I was in the shower, it still hurt.

I carry gels on my race belt to make sure I have enough food for a marathon. I typically rely on the race for hydration unless I have a good support team to hand me water/gatorade--I know this is illegal but I'm not fast enough to matter in the whole scheme of the race. I have run 7 marathons and never had a problem with relying on race drinks for hydration even at small first time marathons. Denver is well aided.
2008-06-17 11:59 AM
in reply to: #1471347

User image

Elite
3471
200010001001001001002525
Evergreen, CO
Subject: RE: Denver Marathon
I wore a fuelbelt for Colfax and hubby rode along for most of the race and refilled my bottles for me w/ electrolytes and water.  Didn't realize it was not legal   I wouldn't recommend a camelback -- too hot and too heavy.  I can't stand the concept of drinking out of a cup once and throwing it away, so don't know what I'll do at a marathon if hubby can't refill for me.  Is it legal to stash refills along the route?


2008-06-17 12:44 PM
in reply to: #1471481

User image

Expert
2555
20005002525
Colorado Springs, Colorado
Subject: RE: Denver Marathon

kayaker - 2008-06-17 9:31 AM Thanks for the info, I'm sure it will help. Do you run with your own water or rely on the aid stations. It seems there will be plenty, but you have to slow down, signal for the water (hopefully someone sees you) drink it and etc. I have a camel back that I use for biking and was planning on using that at least for training and possibly for the race. What do you think.

I always rely on the aid stations. Usually they will be standing there with a cup already for you to grab as you go by. Very minimal slowing. Pinch the cup together at the top so it doesn't slosh out. Since there appears to be lots of aid on the course, hydration shouldn't be an issue. Keep in mind that when you add weight, as in a CamelBak or Fuel Belt, it will slow you down some anyway. Plus that stuff will seem quite heavy in the last few miles. If you rely on sports drinks, find out what they will have on the course and train with it. I always go with just water at the aid stations and a few gels that I carry - but that's how I train as well. I've learned that the sports drink may not be a flavor I like, it may be too warm, it may be mixed improperly, etc., all of which can lead to GI issues late in the race.

I train with a single 20 oz. bottle in a belt that also holds my gels. I plan my long run routes so they include a place where I can refill the bottle. I've tried running with a CamelBak and Fuel Belt, but the extra weight gets to be much more of a burden on a long run than it is on a long bike. YMMV.

Make sure you get in all your planned long runs. More is often better than less in this regard. A marathon is not a place to try and skimp on training because it usually comes back to bite you and make you suffer in the final miles.

2008-06-17 4:42 PM
in reply to: #1471347

User image

Master
4101
20002000100
Denver
Subject: RE: Denver Marathon
I ran this last year and if I remember right they had clif shot gels (not shot bloks) and gatorade endurance on the course.  I hadn't trained with the clif shot stuff so I used my own gels and hd one about every 5 miles or so and washed it down with what they had at the aid station.  Although I could have just wrung out my shirt if I was really thirsty - it was 40* and rained the whole time. 
2008-06-17 10:17 PM
in reply to: #1471347

User image

Member
130
10025
Colorado Springs
Subject: RE: Denver Marathon
I've run several v. long distance races.

My favorite hydration method is to carry a water bottle with me using one of those hand straps (like Ultimate Directions makes). I usually carry some sort of powder drink with me, too - either in little baggies or, depending on what I'm favoring at the moment, pre-packaged. I like a fuel belt - a stretchy one with a couple of neoprene pockets for the drink mix, e-tabs, snacks, lip balm, a $20 safety pinned in, etc. I don't like water bottles on my waist or a camelbak for running - it bounces up and down and drives me NUTS. I think this issue is worse for chicks than guys - our hip/waist ratio, usually, is such that belts ride up to our narrowest part rather than staying tight on our hips. Slippery shorts/shirts don't help this!

As I'm approaching an aid station, I unscrew the lid to my water bottle. If there's any fluid in the bottle, I go ahead and chug it (there shouldn't be any in there; the way I sweat I should just run with an IV). If I'm mixing, I put the powder in. Usually I'm sticky after the first aid station, but who cares. Then I walk v. fast through the aid station - depending on the crowd and the help, either they'll pour water in or I grab a couple of cups and pour them in. Screw the lid on, and go. I might take the opportunity to throw water over my head or even rinse off with it.

I lose very little time, and sometimes, by the end, it even speeds me up a bit because I play the OK, keep this pace to the aid station and you get a break game. The trick is walking really fast, not stopping, and being prepared when you go in.

I find that carrying a hand bottle is a constant reminder to drink, drink, drink.

RE training: do the miles. You can fake your way through one but your chances of recovering quickly and avoiding injury go way down. How many (and how long) long runs depends on your goal, but hit 20 at least once, and have several long runs of 15+.

Find a group to run long runs with, or recruit a few friends to do 5-6 miles at a whack with you.

Start a tad slower & speed up.

Don't try anything new on race day. Not shorts, watch, belt, gu flavor, or anything, if you can help it.

Try to do some long runs in miserable weather, just in case your race is in miserable weather. Use this opportunity to see what clothes work in rain, snow, wind, cold. How to carry a layer you aren't wearing, etc.

Good luck.
2008-06-18 11:05 AM
in reply to: #1473166

User image

Expert
2555
20005002525
Colorado Springs, Colorado
Subject: RE: Denver Marathon

HelenS - 2008-06-17 9:17 PM I like a fuel belt - a stretchy one with a couple of neoprene pockets for the drink mix, e-tabs, snacks, lip balm, a $20 safety pinned in, etc.

Helen, have you tried the LD Race Ready shorts? http://raceready.com/  They have a row of pockets for carrying things and then there is no problem associated with a belt riding up.

New Thread
General Discussion Triathlon Talk » Denver Marathon Rss Feed