General Discussion Triathlon Talk » Tri bike or upgrade my roadie? Rss Feed  
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2012-04-25 11:11 AM
in reply to: #4172158

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Subject: RE: Tri bike or upgrade my roadie?
Bonafide505 - 2012-04-25 1:07 PM

My problem with the roadbikereview study is the rider position. He is clearly lower on the transition. He could easily get lower with a different stem.  


I suspect (but do not know) that they controlled the hip angle between the two bikes.

Shane


2012-04-25 11:24 AM
in reply to: #4172173

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Subject: RE: Tri bike or upgrade my roadie?
Bonafide505 - 2012-04-25 1:11 PM

I can with an inverted stem. And i thought the whole point was aero profile reduction?



The whole point is to put the rider in the most aerodynamic position that they can hold for the duration (TT) or hold for the duration and still run well (tri). There is more to this than just dropping the stem to reduce the CdA term as the hip angle cannot be too closed or the athlete will lose their ability to produce power. While a reduction in CdA can be more beneficial than a loss in power, it is a tradeoff and the goal is to find the sweet spot.

Shane
2012-04-25 11:35 AM
in reply to: #4168466

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Albuquerque, New Mexico
Subject: RE: Tri bike or upgrade my roadie?

Shane,while I agree with you on some points (I actually ride a B2 in most races) I just feel that the aero advantages of a true TT bike (frame) are greatly exaggerated. Maybe it's because i'm older now, but my best TT results have come from a steel road bike frame with a forward seat post and clip ons.

2012-04-25 12:18 PM
in reply to: #4172089

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Subject: RE: Tri bike or upgrade my roadie?
gbrad - 2012-04-25 11:52 AM
Goosedog - 2012-04-25 11:35 AM

I started on a Secteur Sport Compact.  Fine, but I hated the Sora (I know some people do just fine) and wanted a slightly more aggressive position.  I upgraded to a Canndondale CAAD10 105.  Love, love love it.  If you like the Cannondales, don't underestimate their ability to make a first class, race-worthy aluminum bike, while saving you money.

 

 

Did u put clip on aero bars on it? Race wheels? Also, how did u make your position more aggressive?

No clip ons yet.  I've considered putting on some shorty bars, but haven't done it.  No race wheels - I'm too cheap.  The Secteur is designed to have a more relaxed geometry to accomodate a more comfortable position.  This includes a taller headtube.  The CAAD10 is a more traditional race geometry.  I probably could have tinkered a lot more with my fit on the Secteur, but I really wanted the component upgrade as well.

 

 

2012-04-25 1:00 PM
in reply to: #4171325

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Subject: RE: Tri bike or upgrade my roadie?

the bear - 2012-04-25 4:09 AM I may have missed it but what is wrong with your current bike that you feel the need to upgrade?

Goosedog - 2012-04-25 8:35 AM

I started on a Secteur Sport Compact.  Fine, but I hated the Sora (I know some people do just fine) and wanted a slightly more aggressive position.  I upgraded to a Canndondale CAAD10 105.  Love, love love it.  If you like the Cannondales, don't underestimate their ability to make a first class, race-worthy aluminum bike, while saving you money.

 

There's nothing "wrong" with my bike, but I got an entry level bike to make sure that I liked it, and then had the intention to upgrade when I know it's something that I love.  I don't NEED to upgrade, but since I have the funds available right now, I'd like to but a nicer bike that I can continue learning on. 

As Goosedog also pointed out, Sora really is really annoying to me, and I'd like to upgrade to the 105 components.   First of all, I don't like not being able to shift when in the drops, due to the high shift button.  The derailleur's/shifting also seem to jump around more, and even though I've taken it in a couple times, it'll still jump from big ring to small ring (mine's a triple) when I shift.  Also, I got it for about 45% off, and I'm sure I can around what I paid for it by selling it now, and putting that towards a better bike.   I was also told that carbon helps absorb bumps, and where I ride, that would be a huge benefit (no matter how minimal the effect).  There's a few other reasons, and I know that it's not completely necessary, but something I'd like to do since I have the funds available to me. 



Edited by djake80 2012-04-25 1:01 PM
2012-04-25 1:11 PM
in reply to: #4172500

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Subject: RE: Tri bike or upgrade my roadie?
djake80 - 2012-04-25 2:00 PM

There's a few other reasons, and I know that it's not completely necessary, but something I'd like to do since I have the funds available to me. 

Just some thoughts on the Cannondale aluminum v. carbon, try them both on your roads.  You might be surprised.  The $900 difference between the Super Six and CAAD10 can buy a lot of goodies.  I have a lot of guys riding much more expensive carbon bikes ask me about mine all the time.  They usually say something like, "Man, I used to have a CAAD[something].  I loved that bike."  Most importantly, aluminum is retrocool.

 



2012-04-25 1:45 PM
in reply to: #4168466

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Subject: RE: Tri bike or upgrade my roadie?

Did someone say CAAD10? Sealed  Yes, I know I'm picture whoring it but I really have grown to love this bike. Pretty happy with this set-up for tri season (it's only my second season) and pretty easy to go back to a road set-up.

2012-04-25 3:59 PM
in reply to: #4168466

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Subject: RE: Tri bike or upgrade my roadie?
This setup resembles my trek 1.5 setup as well - I added some wheel upgrades..
2012-04-25 6:15 PM
in reply to: #4168466

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Subject: RE: Tri bike or upgrade my roadie?
It sounds like upgrading your road bike is the best move. I have been in the same predicament. I have a road bike I bought on Craigslist about 6 years ago. It is a great bike -- Guru Strada, which is actually a steel frame, but it is a NICE bike with 105 components. I love the soft ride, BUT it isn't super light compared to an aluminum or carbon bike. I don't do group rides much, though. I've done triathlons for 6 years. I don't want to get rid of my road bike, though it would be nice to have a lighter one.

I would encourage you to try LOTS of bikes. It sounds like you have settled on a Cannondale, but bikes do fit VERY differently. Go try Specialized, Trek, and Felt just to compare. I have tried about 5 or 6 different tri bikes, and have settled on the Cannondale Slice 5. I'm just saving the money to buy it. I am female, and I know the C'dale is great for females. I have my measurements for my road bike, so I can compare some of them to the tri bike geometries, and the Cannondale not only felt best, the measurements match up. If you are going to spend that much money, get the bike that is as close to perfect as you can.

You asked if a road bike would work in an HIM. Absolutely! I've done 2 HIMs on my road bike. I did put clip-on aerobars on it, but I took them off last year. I wanted to take the bike back to a road bike configuration, which is what it was made for. The only downside to taking them off is that it is really hard to stay in the drops for a really long time (my arms and elbows got tired). My Oly last year was tough in that respect. So, you might put aerobars on for the HIM, then take them off. It does require that you slide your saddle forward, so just make sure you mark where it was.

As far as training, I was told to train on my road bike and race on my tri bike. Of course, you'd want to take the tri bike out for rides now and then to become "one with the bike". In general, it is actually best to train on a road bike, especially if you have hills.

I think your plan sounds good. Upgrade the road bike now, then get a tri bike later. I wish I had that option, but it just isn't going to happen. I'm just going for the tri bike.

2012-04-25 6:26 PM
in reply to: #4172162

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Subject: RE: Tri bike or upgrade my roadie?
gsmacleod - 2012-04-25 11:08 AM

Bonafide505 - 2012-04-25 1:04 PM

Well let's compare apples to apples. You can get in a very similar position on a road bike therefore we should only look at those values- not rider position.


I cannot replicate my tribike position on my road bike; that's the whole point of having a tribike.

Shane


Shane is right. You can't replicate. Even if you try to, your steering gets squirrelly. I had my road bike set up with aerobars for 4 years, and I was o.k. with it, but in reality, a road bike is not meant to have your weight on the front wheel like a tri bike. It won't perform well that way. BUT getting more aero does help if that's your only option right now. I decided last year (after my LBS bike fitter suggested it to me) to take my road bike back to a road bike, and believe it or not, I'm just as fast. I can climb better for sure (I pass everyone on the hills, especially those on tri bikes). Aerobars are great for longer distances for sure! I'm hoping to get a tri bike before my next HIM and certainly before my IM next year. Tri bikes are great for racing, but they aren't great for just riding. If you only have one or the other, you just have to make sacrifices.

Oh, and on carbon vs. aluminum -- DEFINITELY go with carbon if you have the money. I mean, if you're upgrading, then upgrade all the way. I have a steel bike, my husband has an aluminum bike, and I've test ridden LOTS of carbon tri bikes. My husband LOVES the feel of my steel bike. The carbon bikes feel very similar, but they are lighter and stiffer. Aluminum bikes are just stiff. Some people like the stiffness for the handling, but I personally would prefer the comfort. If you've ever ridden on chip-sealed roads, you know what I'm talking about! LOL! My husband can attest to that when we ride together on country roads!
2012-04-26 1:25 PM
in reply to: #4173341

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Subject: RE: Tri bike or upgrade my roadie?

3chilipeppers - 2012-04-25 4:15 PM It sounds like upgrading your road bike is the best move. I have been in the same predicament. I have a road bike I bought on Craigslist about 6 years ago. It is a great bike -- Guru Strada, which is actually a steel frame, but it is a NICE bike with 105 components. I love the soft ride, BUT it isn't super light compared to an aluminum or carbon bike. I don't do group rides much, though. I've done triathlons for 6 years. I don't want to get rid of my road bike, though it would be nice to have a lighter one. I would encourage you to try LOTS of bikes. It sounds like you have settled on a Cannondale, but bikes do fit VERY differently. Go try Specialized, Trek, and Felt just to compare. I have tried about 5 or 6 different tri bikes, and have settled on the Cannondale Slice 5. I'm just saving the money to buy it. I am female, and I know the C'dale is great for females. I have my measurements for my road bike, so I can compare some of them to the tri bike geometries, and the Cannondale not only felt best, the measurements match up. If you are going to spend that much money, get the bike that is as close to perfect as you can. You asked if a road bike would work in an HIM. Absolutely! I've done 2 HIMs on my road bike. I did put clip-on aerobars on it, but I took them off last year. I wanted to take the bike back to a road bike configuration, which is what it was made for. The only downside to taking them off is that it is really hard to stay in the drops for a really long time (my arms and elbows got tired). My Oly last year was tough in that respect. So, you might put aerobars on for the HIM, then take them off. It does require that you slide your saddle forward, so just make sure you mark where it was. As far as training, I was told to train on my road bike and race on my tri bike. Of course, you'd want to take the tri bike out for rides now and then to become "one with the bike". In general, it is actually best to train on a road bike, especially if you have hills. I think your plan sounds good. Upgrade the road bike now, then get a tri bike later. I wish I had that option, but it just isn't going to happen. I'm just going for the tri bike.

Thanks for all the great info!  I really do like the Cannondales and I've also checked out the Specialized, but I'll probably try out a couple others just to see.  I brought a friend to go check out bikes with me yesterday, and she ended up putting a deposit on a Caad10!  Super happy I got my first friend into the sport! 



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