General Discussion Triathlon Talk » Buying used bike - how to handle this issue? Rss Feed  
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2016-10-23 8:48 AM


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Subject: Buying used bike - how to handle this issue?
Hi all,
I've been looking online for a tri bike, and after inquiring with sellers about a couple specific ones I've come to realize that the fork is usually cut down and does not allow for much adjustability. This is an issue for me because I ride with my front end a little higher than normal. My question then becomes, is the only option here when buying used to buy a new uncut fork as well? I had also contemplated sizing up a frame, but determined that would stretch me out too far.

Any suggestions are appreciated!


2016-10-23 9:09 AM
in reply to: linkslefty


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, Wisconsin
Subject: RE: Buying used bike - how to handle this issue?
Originally posted by linkslefty

Hi all,
I've been looking online for a tri bike, and after inquiring with sellers about a couple specific ones I've come to realize that the fork is usually cut down and does not allow for much adjustability. This is an issue for me because I ride with my front end a little higher than normal. My question then becomes, is the only option here when buying used to buy a new uncut fork as well? I had also contemplated sizing up a frame, but determined that would stretch me out too far.

Any suggestions are appreciated!


You might consider a stem with a rise of greater than 10 degrees . . . just a thought.
2016-10-23 9:15 AM
in reply to: linkslefty

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Pro
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, New Hampshire
Subject: RE: Buying used bike - how to handle this issue?
That is one of the drawbacks of buying a used frame. It depends a bit on how high you ride to start with... If only slightly higher than the bike you are looking at, then you can use a stem with a 17deg rise (+/-17). If the rise you require is created than that, I would recommend looking at a different bike...

It's never a good idea to go to a too large frame just to accommodate the riding position, that only means that the brand/model you are looking at simple doesn't fit you well. What you need is something that has a large stack and moderate reach.

http://www.slowtwitch.com/stackreach.html
2016-10-23 2:04 PM
in reply to: #5202750


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Subject: RE: Buying used bike - how to handle this issue?
So currently I've had an extension put on my fork that raised it up a few inches. If I measure from the BB to my aero pad height it's 27.5 inches, and my reach from BB to steering column is about 14.75 inches. Any feedback on that?
2016-10-23 3:45 PM
in reply to: linkslefty

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Pro
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Subject: RE: Buying used bike - how to handle this issue?
No idea if that is good or bad.... those numbers doesn't mean much at all.

Best thing to do would be to take a photo with you on the bike. That would help tremendously.
2016-10-23 3:49 PM
in reply to: linkslefty

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Subject: RE: Buying used bike - how to handle this issue?
Originally posted by linkslefty

Hi all,
I've been looking online for a tri bike, and after inquiring with sellers about a couple specific ones I've come to realize that the fork is usually cut down and does not allow for much adjustability. This is an issue for me because I ride with my front end a little higher than normal. My question then becomes, is the only option here when buying used to buy a new uncut fork as well? I had also contemplated sizing up a frame, but determined that would stretch me out too far.

Any suggestions are appreciated!


You can buy pads that can take risers

Look at Zipp Vuka Alumina & risers for example


2016-10-24 6:50 AM
in reply to: marcag

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Durham, North Carolina
Subject: RE: Buying used bike - how to handle this issue?
Originally posted by marcag

Originally posted by linkslefty

Hi all,
I've been looking online for a tri bike, and after inquiring with sellers about a couple specific ones I've come to realize that the fork is usually cut down and does not allow for much adjustability. This is an issue for me because I ride with my front end a little higher than normal. My question then becomes, is the only option here when buying used to buy a new uncut fork as well? I had also contemplated sizing up a frame, but determined that would stretch me out too far.

Any suggestions are appreciated!


You can buy pads that can take risers

Look at Zipp Vuka Alumina & risers for example



I would suggest that as well. I bought my used tri bike with an uncut stem so they are out there, but I'm sure that's rare.
2016-10-24 7:32 AM
in reply to: Lupy

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Subject: RE: Buying used bike - how to handle this issue?
If you find a a good deal on a bike that fits well, buying a new front fork maybe the best thing to do. Front forks are not that expensive, and since there is nothing wrong with the fork on the bike you are buying, you can resell it and get some of that money back. Or mount the fork on a board and make a nice trueing stand.
2016-10-24 9:08 AM
in reply to: mike761

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Subject: RE: Buying used bike - how to handle this issue?
Originally posted by mike761

If you find a a good deal on a bike that fits well, buying a new front fork maybe the best thing to do. Front forks are not that expensive, and since there is nothing wrong with the fork on the bike you are buying, you can resell it and get some of that money back. Or mount the fork on a board and make a nice trueing stand.



While it's almost splitting hairs, an aero bar with pad risers will be more aerodynamic than a heat tube with a bunch of risers.
2016-10-24 2:34 PM
in reply to: marcag


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Subject: RE: Buying used bike - how to handle this issue?
Looking at the geometry of some bikes, it appears I may just be better suited for a road racing bike like a Felt AR or a Cervelo S series or something like that. Something that has a larger stack number. Otherwise I may end up buying a tri bike and adding all kinds of crap to the front end to raise it up, which would defeat the purpose of having a tri bike in the first place.

Is what I'm saying making sense?
2016-10-24 2:56 PM
in reply to: linkslefty

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Subject: RE: Buying used bike - how to handle this issue?
Originally posted by linkslefty

Looking at the geometry of some bikes, it appears I may just be better suited for a road racing bike like a Felt AR or a Cervelo S series or something like that. Something that has a larger stack number. Otherwise I may end up buying a tri bike and adding all kinds of crap to the front end to raise it up, which would defeat the purpose of having a tri bike in the first place.

Is what I'm saying making sense?


how much drop do you have between top of seat and pads ?


2016-10-24 3:23 PM
in reply to: marcag


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Subject: RE: Buying used bike - how to handle this issue?
Maybe a couple inches. It's not much at all.
2016-10-25 9:28 AM
in reply to: linkslefty

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Subject: RE: Buying used bike - how to handle this issue?
Personally, I would look at buying an upgraded bar that has the option for taller risers. I don't usually cut my stems though. I did that so I could sell them, although I never have! lol What size bike you looking for? I'm upgrading soon and may have one for sale with an uncut stem
2016-10-25 11:45 AM
in reply to: linkslefty

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Subject: RE: Buying used bike - how to handle this issue?
Originally posted by linkslefty

Maybe a couple inches. It's not much at all.


Without all the data it's hard to form an opinion, but in general I'd say you should be able to get lower than that so I would find a solution that is going to allow you to evolve in that direction.

Don't underestimate the solution of an aerobar with risers. This is the way some of the top manufacturers are making their bikes more aero.

Head tube and spacers are evil :-)


2016-10-28 3:49 PM
in reply to: marcag


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Subject: RE: Buying used bike - how to handle this issue?
Thanks for all the responses guys. An issue I had this last year was riding on a lower front end in aero position for too long was causing some numbness in my toes. After I put an extension on my front end and raised up the front, it relieved that numbness. However I don't want to ride a bike with an extension because it seems to be a band aid and frankly, I think it looks bad. I found some risers for my old syntace clip on aero bars, but my question is, how high of a riser is still considered safe? Up to an inch? Is the idea of an upward angled stem coupled with aero pad risers acceptable, or would that lend toward the argument that the bike isn't the right size?

2016-10-29 4:27 AM
in reply to: linkslefty

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Subject: RE: Buying used bike - how to handle this issue?
Originally posted by linkslefty

Thanks for all the responses guys. An issue I had this last year was riding on a lower front end in aero position for too long was causing some numbness in my toes. After I put an extension on my front end and raised up the front, it relieved that numbness. However I don't want to ride a bike with an extension because it seems to be a band aid and frankly, I think it looks bad. I found some risers for my old syntace clip on aero bars, but my question is, how high of a riser is still considered safe? Up to an inch? Is the idea of an upward angled stem coupled with aero pad risers acceptable, or would that lend toward the argument that the bike isn't the right size?




The Zipp Vuka go up to 5mm (2 inches). The Argon 119 gets all it's stack adjustability by risers and I would have to check but I believe they are around 5cm as well. The Tour guys routinely have 5cm of risers under their pads.

However, I am not sure what a long stem at a high angle with 5cm of pads would be like.

One thing you may want to try is some shorter cranks to open up your hip angle. This is a proven way to get lower.

Here is Alex Dowsett's setup




(Alex Dowsett TT bike Tour de France 2015 - 12.jpg)



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Alex Dowsett TT bike Tour de France 2015 - 12.jpg (27KB - 7 downloads)


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General Discussion Triathlon Talk » Buying used bike - how to handle this issue? Rss Feed