General Discussion Triathlon Talk » Is crashing inevitable? Rss Feed  
Moderators: k9car363, alicefoeller Reply
Show Per page
 
 
of 1
 
 
2016-09-02 10:10 PM

User image

Extreme Veteran
1106
1000100
, Connecticut
Subject: Is crashing inevitable?
I'm not much of a cyclist. Just rode around a city block growing up. For ten years I rode a $600 road bike - and managed an oly last year. Finally realized it was crazy not to have a decent bike. If my kids were into a riding I'd never let them ride such a crappy bike. Bought myself a basic Trek Silque. Being 5' I like that it's sized for a small person and my friend owns the bike shop and he spent a very long time having me sit on some large contraption to get the adjustments right.

Didn't even consider getting a tri bike as I nearly stop to make a turn and ride my brakes going downhill, I'd feel silly, like a poser

  • So I got on the bike and was amazed at how tight it could turn, feeling happy...five minutes later I stopped and proceeded to slowly fall to the right. Got pretty cut up. Have only ridden it once after that (other than on the trainer), and did so in sneakers.

    I hate that I've gotten so scared of biking. Read about crashes, watched some wipe-outs at the Olympics and heard that the Iron-nun had shattered her pelvis in a biking accident. Is it inevitable that if you ride you will crash? I hate being like this. I want to get on that bike. I'd love to have crazy bike handling skills, ain't going to happen on the trainer.


    2016-09-03 5:37 AM
    in reply to: #5197615


    8

    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    Hi,
    I can't speak for others here, but I've crashed a few times. At least twice early on learning how to unclip at a traffic light, very embarrassing though I'm sure some wouldn't consider this a crash. Another time a truck swerved into the bike lane and sent me ass over end onto the blacktop resulting in some road rash and a broken elbow. I don't consider these things inevitable, just accidents. Stay positive, ride as safe and when/where it's safe as possible otherwise you'll drive yourself nuts. I've also learned not to tell my family about the myriad of close calls, it just worries them.
    Ride safe,
    John
    2016-09-03 6:48 AM
    in reply to: MuscleMomma

    User image


    702
    500100100
    Aledo, Texas
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?

    Statistically speaking, you will crash. It's just a question of how. Of course, that's true of driving. Yet, many folks have never wrecked in cycling or driving. Falling over at a stop is a rite of passage. It's more embarrassing than anything else. I've done it more than once.

    Last year, I wrecked during a race. Fractured my orbital socket in three places, had a TBI and a concussion. I don't remember anything about the crash, even today. I was cleared to ride again this past June. I was scared as heck to get back in the saddle on the road. There are a lot uncontrollable variables out there. After about a month, I started riding my TT bike, which is the one on which I wrecked. That made me super nervous. But, I took it easy for a few weeks. And, before I knew it, I felt much more comfortable on it. Now, it's no big deal.

    My mom asked my wife if she gets nervous about me riding again. My wife said that she recognizes the risks of cycling, but says if it keeps me motivated to stay healthy, that outweighs the dangers. If we really think about it, there are lots of things we do every day, like driving, that are incredibly dangerous. We don't give those a second thought. Yet, we worry far more about cycling than other activities (maybe because we're so exposed?).

    Personally, I think there should be a little fear in cycling. It forces me to respect and think about what I am doing. I'd like to think it also makes me a more courteous cyclist in sharing the road. For me, it's been worth it. I really enjoy it. If you decide to stick with it, be safe, courteous and smart. Just like driving.

    2016-09-03 6:52 AM
    in reply to: #5197621

    User image


    370
    1001001002525
    , North Carolina
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    Ah, clipless pedals. I wouldn't say it's inevitable but it does happen. I'd say there is a learning curve.

    When I first got contacts it usually took me 1/2 hour to get them in my eyes and it was always a struggle. But, I hated my glasses so i stuck with it. Eventually, i became better and better. Now, it's second nature.

    With pedals i did the slow fall once or twice but after that I was good to go. I think you already have one out of the way. Which foot unclips easier. When, you know a stop is coming unclip early, give your self plenty of time. Or find some grass to learn on. We've all been there, you'll get it.
    2016-09-03 7:17 AM
    in reply to: Nick B

    User image


    409
    100100100100
    Durham, North Carolina
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    If you don't count learning how to use clipless pedals I don't think crashing is inevitable. I think certain things put you at a higher risk for it, and if you want you can choose to avoid them. I personally don't like riding in large groups so I try to stick to smaller groups of people that I know and trust. When I do ride in large groups I'm much more defensive. I've been ridden off the road once, but luckily there was no curb so I just went into the grass and came to a stop. If you want to get into racing you'll have to take a lot more risks, but I'm assuming you aren't into that so you can make more defensive decisions that won't really affect your goal. If you want to learn handling skills though I recommend cyclocross. Its a ton of fun and a very laid back environment. The plus is that if you crash you are in dirt or mud and it doesn't really hurt or do much damage.
    2016-09-03 7:22 AM
    in reply to: 0

    User image

    Pro
    6005
    50001000
    Camp Hill, Pennsylvania
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?

    Yeah, pretty much so, but there are things we can do to reduce the frequency and severity of most accidents.

    Work on your handling skills.  On a street without traffic or in a parking lot, practice removing and replacing your water bottles from their cages without looking.  Practice looking over your shoulder to check behind you without swerving.  Practice making tight radius turns.  Practice braking hard.  As your skills improve, your confidence and comfort on the bike will improve too.

    Condition yourself to pay attention to your surroundings.  Situational awareness combined with good handling skills allows most potential accidents to be avoided.  Ride like you're invisible.  Always assume that no one else can see you, even if a motorist appears to make eye contact with you, they're frequently looking straight through you, and didn't even see you.

    Learn when to "take control of your lane" when riding in traffic.  Literally every day, I see cyclists stay to the right in the shoulder at traffic lights and other intersections where the safest thing is to take the lane until they're through the intersection.  (Riding in the shoulder through an intersection like this can take you out of the awareness of motorists, and set you up for getting hit by a turning car.)

    When you're ready, do group rides to get used to riding around other cyclists.

    Also, there's nothing wrong with ditching the clipless pedals for now in favor of platform pedals until you feel comfortable upgrading to clipless.



    Edited by TriMyBest 2016-09-03 7:23 AM


    2016-09-03 10:07 AM
    in reply to: MuscleMomma


    467
    1001001001002525
    , Wisconsin
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    All have been great responses so far. I'll just add a bit. As a 62 year old, I definitely have concerns about crashing and getting banged up. Since "restarting" tri and road biking a couple of years ago I've logged probably about 7000-8000 road miles. Fell exactly once, and it was just a real dumb move on my part. Was only going maybe 15, pulling away from stoplight, so just a bit a rash and some bruising etc. Able to ride another 25mi home.

    I've come close to crashing more than a few times, reckless drivers, lose rocks in the middle of tight corner, pedestrians jumping out in front etc. Decent bike handling skills and always trying to look ahead and be very aware have saved my tail. In April I got tangled up in the covers/dogs etc. climbing out of bunk bed in our RV, fell, broke one rib and cracked a couple more, not recommended.The point is that I got hurt not biking, but doing a simple day to day thing. Could have been a patch of ice in the driveway or any number of things. Thousands of miles biking, some at pretty high speeds, traffic, descending, etc and no real injuries. I guess I just try to ride safe, be very aware, avoid busy or crowded roads and enjoy being on the bike outside.
    2016-09-03 1:10 PM
    in reply to: MuscleMomma

    User image

    Master
    1718
    1000500100100
    Loughborough, England
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?

    Has anyone with clipless pedals managed to avoid tipping over?  It does become second nature but everyone I know has done it at some point when they were getting used to them.  In terms of a proper crash I think some people are at more of a risk than others, just the same as driving.  Obviously you can simply be in the wrong place at the wrong time but again no more so than being in a car and we don't think twice about this.

    Don't forget that a high percentage of serious bike accidents get talked about but there are millions of people a day who have safe uneventful rides - they just never get a mention.

    2016-09-03 2:08 PM
    in reply to: tridantri

    User image


    216
    100100
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    Originally posted by tridantri

    Has anyone with clipless pedals managed to avoid tipping over?  It does become second nature but everyone I know has done it at some point when they were getting used to them.




    When I decided to try clipless, I hedged against the tip-over by choosing Shimano Click'r pedals. Supposedly they have 62% less step-out effort than SPD's. I can neither confirm nor deny the accuracy of that figure, but I can attest that they work as advertised. Two years later, I'm still using them and haven't tipped yet (knock on wood) despite a few forgetful moments where I forgot I was locked in until I was already stopped and starting to lean. I've only had one unexpected un-cleat on the road bike on a particularly nasty bump. I threw them on my old mountain bike (~30 lbs) when we went on vacation and tried to ride up Loveland Pass from Dillon/Keystone. I had 3 or 4 inadvertent releases on that ascent, but it was a pretty extreme situation. Maybe could have minimized that by adjusting the spring tension, but I was about 50% mentally incapacitated from the effort and low ambient oxygen so I didn't think of it at the time.
    2016-09-03 4:39 PM
    in reply to: MuscleMomma

    User image

    Expert
    1608
    1000500100
    Grapevine, Texas
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    Hi Mitzi! I'm not into tri's these days, but still enjoy riding my Trek Madone. I don't think it is inevitable to fall, but the risk increases if you ride on the road, in tight groups, in races, etc. Personally, I have decided to limit my riding to multi-use paths, and a few wide open neighborhood streets that get me from home to the path. Still no guarantee, and life is filled with risks. Saw an ambulance carting a cyclist off from the path the other day. He evidently hit the pole that is up to stop car traffic from getting on the path. One moment of inattention is all it takes and none of us are perfect. But I just find path riding to be more in line with my desire to enjoy the ride, and not looking over my shoulder or dealing with texting, talking, or just plain mean drivers.
    2016-09-04 8:01 AM
    in reply to: MuscleMomma

    User image

    Extreme Veteran
    909
    500100100100100
    Westchester, NY
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    As a long time rider and long time triathlete, I can answer - yes.
    All cyclists who ride outside fall into 2 camps - those who have crashed and those who have yet to crash.

    I "crashed" rolling through a light, waiting for the rest of my team to get through the light. My front wheel got caught in a road crack, and I fell going 4 mph.

    My other crash was a lot more violent. I came off going 32 mph. In a descent into a whip turn that I've done more than 100 times.
    A teammate broke the cardinal rule of braking in a decent and either I crash into them, or I try to avoid the crash. I avoided wiping us both out, but I came off and point blank into a boulder on the side of the road. I smashed my entire left side. My helmet saved my life.

    I can tell you how many crashes I've seen during races. In big races and small.

    So yes, cyclists crash. You as a cyclist just have to up your bike handling skills and try to anticipate what the situation will dictate. Much like driving your car.


    2016-09-04 6:45 PM
    in reply to: MuscleMomma

    User image


    233
    10010025
    Ventura, California
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?

    Congrats on the new bike purchase, and congrats on finishing an Oly last year on a crappy $600 road bike. Accidents happen, but the more time you have on the bike the more experience and the reduced chance of an accident happening. 

     

    I think that crashing is probably inevitable, but not a rule of law. I almost did the slow tip over just yesterday, I barely caught it in time. First ride on clipless pedals/shoes, I had ridden with rat traps for over a year so I just forgot I was in new pedals. I watched a much more experienced guy literally just fall over on one of our pit stops, luckily he did not get hurt.

    So far I am pretty lucky and have only crashed once, I got caught in a railroad rut and tipped over and landed on my elbow and hip. I got lucky and got some scrapes and a pretty nasty bruise on the hip that was painful for a couple weeks, a gal fell on the same tracks earlier in the year and broke her hip.

    I have had several scary close calls, all where due to high speeds, and fatigue, especially fatigue. The fall I described above was due to fatigue, I was 40 miles into the ride and had been pushing hard trying to hang with the lead pack. I have been over those tracks many times and I just totally failed to properly turn my wheel across them and dropped right in and tried to turn (wrong move) and it was too late and down I went. 

    In regards to your almost falling over try the following, while sitting on the bike leaning against a wall, practice unclipping and clipping in your pedals until it comes natural. Then always unclip early before every stop.

    Also I would recommend going on group rides, ask your local bike shop for information on local groups that will be a fit to your level of riding. I now enjoy riding with groups more then I enjoy riding alone. You will learn bike skills faster as you keep up with the group, the group will typically ride a route that you really have no choice but to go along so you will find yourself being challenged with new situations on most rides. You will gain passing skills, traffic management skills, braking and turning skills, etc and have a good time and make new friends. Groups of bikes are easier to see from a traffic standpoint and 20 bikes taking a lane is alot safer then one lone cyclist.

    In regards to your unworthy, crappy $600 road bike, I gotta kind throw this out there in jest:

    I rock a $150 27yr old 1988 Peugoet 12 speed with downtube shifters. I have completed 3 Triathlons, a Gran Fondo, and have well over 1,000 miles on it. I have sustained 18mph over the course of 20 miles with hills, I have reached 50-52mph on downhill speed runs, just yesterday I PR'ed a 6.5 mile super twisty downhill mountain segment dropping 1,500ft at an average speed of 30mph. I just recently upgrade to modern pedals and clip in shoes, other then that its all French Peugeot; even the new pedals are made in France. Oh ya have a 104 mile race with 8000' of elevation gain in 2 weeks, yes on a 27yr old French road bike!  

    Now get on that bike and go have FUN! 

    Just remember Fatigue is your enemy, when you feel it you have to force yourself to stay on alert. Don't let the fatigue monster bite you!

    2016-09-04 9:22 PM
    in reply to: #5197615

    User image

    Extreme Veteran
    1106
    1000100
    , Connecticut
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    Hi Carol!
    Thanks you guys, I really want this. First I was more scared, but then hearing how you all just got back in the saddle...
    2016-09-06 8:57 PM
    in reply to: MuscleMomma


    160
    1002525
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    One thing I did when I got my first bike with clips is practice in an empty parking lot. clip, unclip, clip, unclip and so forth.

    Without the cars, pedestrian and other bikes, you can practice until is becomes easy and you gain confidence.

    Also, some clips can be adjusted to be easier to remove vs more firm for performance....
    2017-04-14 10:21 PM
    in reply to: Antoine tri

    User image

    Extreme Veteran
    1106
    1000100
    , Connecticut
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    Just re-read responses, thanks guys.
    I've been enjoying my time on the trainer, will be hitting the road soon...
    2017-04-14 11:39 PM
    in reply to: MuscleMomma

    User image


    233
    10010025
    Ventura, California
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?

    Glad to see your still practicing with the bike. Best wishes and safe riding out on the open road. I got my first big group ride tomorrow. So looking forward to riding with the group again. Tackling a 60 miler tomorrow with some pretty hefty elevation gains and some fast downhill screamers!

    Still riding that old $150 1988 Peugeot (although I have about a $1,000 into it now, lol)

    One of the things I recently purchased for safety was a very bright rear flashing light. It helps give me just a little more comfort on the road and I have noticed cars and trucks give me much more room now as they are keenly aware of my presence. 

    https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/equipment/cycling-accessories/bike-lights/bontrager-flare-r-tail-light/p/13202/

    Cheers and best wishes 

    PS: Fatigue monster bit me again about a month ago, had to come to a panic stop and was so tired (mile 48) I could not unclip and down I went. Luckily just a couple minor scratches and a tiny bruise on the hip.



    2017-04-15 6:57 AM
    in reply to: #5197714

    User image


    259
    1001002525
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    Just about everyone has fallen over at some point with clipless pedals. I was riding with some friends last year and one of the more experienced riders I know rolled up, couldn't get his foot out, and proceeded to slowly tip over...almost in slow motion. We all enjoyed that one!

    In regards to crashing...if you ride long enough it's probably going to happen at some point. I had my first real crash last year on a sketchy downhill. I was going too fast (around 40-45 mph), hit some dirt, and couldn't turn...completely my fault for being a moron. Fortunately the only damages was my kit and my pride. The important thing is to learn from it. Just remember to tuck and roll. Someone once told me that most injuries from crashing happen when people stick their arms out to try and break their fall.
    2017-04-15 7:12 PM
    in reply to: MuscleMomma

    User image

    Veteran
    2297
    2000100100252525
    Great White North
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    Crashes happen, bad ones are not that frequent. Statistically you are more likely to get hurt in a car.
    2017-04-16 10:23 PM
    in reply to: MuscleMomma


    1055
    10002525
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    In bike races, absolutely. Went down twice last year and avoided crashes in other races. It's an inevitable part of the sport as you've seen on TV in watching the Olympics. The good news is that all of my crashes weren't anything I couldn't bounce back from immediately. Soreness yes, road rash, but nothing broken and that's true for 95% of the crashes out there. Back in the saddle next day.

    Outside of bike racing, crashes are pretty rare and most are avoidable by not taking chances, or as I call it, winter riding rules. Don't overcook downhills, don't corner aggressively in the wet, don't pedal through sharper turns, and never overlap a wheel. If you're worried about getting back on the bike, that's natural.
    2017-04-17 12:58 AM
    in reply to: ziggie204

    User image


    93
    252525
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    My only crash after about two and a half years of cycling was self-inflicted. I fumbled with the water bottle and forgetting I was on the bike, I tried to catch it. Stupid! I have done that a couple of other times since and I now know to just let if fall and ride back to get it. I think most crashes can be prevented or their severity greatly reduced by being ready for a possible crash at obvious time (when cornering, when noticing moss on mountain roads, etc.).
    2017-04-17 1:18 PM
    in reply to: Trilogy

    User image

    Extreme Veteran
    657
    5001002525
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    I was riding my Mountain bike on a pretty warm day. I slipped at about 1 mph as I was looking ahead on the trail. I suffered a minor abrasion of both elbows and both knees. They commenced to bleed and due to the increased cardiac output and the sweat that mixed in I was literally covered in blood. A couple was horrified when they saw me. It was hard for me to convince them that I was "ok". I rode off. My son told me I should have told them, "What ever you do, don't go down that trail. I don't know what that thing was."

    I did quite a bit of road racing prior to triathlons. I'm pretty sure I have a scar on both shoulders, both elbows and both knees. You fall, you get back on the bike, and just keep riding.


    2017-04-17 4:45 PM
    in reply to: MuscleMomma

    User image

    Master
    2706
    2000500100100
    Los Angeles, CA
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    Yup, I crashed on a route I've ridden for more than 10 years ago recently and hurt my ribs, hips, and took some skin off. My love for being outdoors biking motivated me to heal as quickly as possible so I can ride again. I understand the fear factor you speak of but I'd never let fear get in my way of enjoying this part of my lifestyle and you shouldn't let it prevent you from getting out there. Once you get out there and ride, the fear will slowly go away and your confidence will skyrocket.
    2017-04-17 9:02 PM
    in reply to: Toefuzz

    User image

    Expert
    2555
    20005002525
    Colorado Springs, Colorado
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    No, crashing is not inevitable. Hopefully you've practiced using your shoes and pedals extensively while riding your trainer. Practice unclipping while in the upstroke and downstroke with both feet so you know how to get out quickly. Don't wait for the emergency situation and then panic because you haven't practiced. Take your bike out and just practice clipping in and out. Do it at slow speeds and higher speeds. Try doing bike stands when you're nit moving and be ready to unclip with either foot. This is what far too many don't do...practice.
    2017-04-18 7:41 AM
    in reply to: MuscleMomma

    User image

    Veteran
    486
    100100100100252525
    Newcastle, England
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?

    I would say it depends on the person.

    I crash/fall off on average 2-3 times per yer.

    But I must add that I am a Bit dyspraxic which is a contributing factor ... I also trip over when out running

    2017-04-18 7:59 AM
    in reply to: MuscleMomma

    User image

    Pro
    5890
    5000500100100100252525
    , New Hampshire
    Subject: RE: Is crashing inevitable?
    Yes you will crash eventually. Most people crash as they forget to clip out, or lean the bike in the "wrong" direction, i.e. where you didn't clip out... Not everyone will have a high speed crash.

    I used to bike race when I was younger (as a sprinter) and we actually practiced crashing. Head tucked in, elbows tucked in and do not let go of the handlebars. Common injuries in speed crashes are broken collar bone and broken wrist and both these happen when you try to catch yourself. Best thing to do is actually NOT to catch yourself...
    New Thread
    General Discussion Triathlon Talk » Is crashing inevitable? Rss Feed  
    Show Per page
     
     
    of 1
     
     
    RELATED POSTS

    Chain rub inevitable?

    Started by slornow
    Views: 2654 Posts: 17

    2010-09-22 7:58 PM AdventureBear

    Are knee issues inevitable?

    Started by Rogillio
    Views: 1340 Posts: 15

    2010-06-29 3:52 PM juniperjen

    I am a beginner and I am scared, but hopeful

    Started by trisome
    Views: 2675 Posts: 15

    2013-08-07 7:47 AM Sidney Porter

    Long run crash and burn this AM! What' next??

    Started by chevy57
    Views: 382 Posts: 2

    2009-06-11 3:28 PM JohnnyKay

    Crash and burn Mav, crash and burn!

    Started by cwsiii
    Views: 1786 Posts: 19

    2008-03-24 10:10 AM jamesehatcher
    RELATED ARTICLES
    date : May 31, 2016
    author : rjcalhoun
    comments : 5
    From heavy, stressed business owner to triathlete
     
    date : November 10, 2014
    author : AMSSM
    comments : 0
    A concussion is a complicated injury. Recovery can be several days to weeks. There are several things that you can do to minimize future or repeated risks of a concussion.
    date : October 18, 2012
    author : AMSSM
    comments : 3
    How long before I will notice major improvement? How long in the sling? Should I do any kind of exercise or rehab while in your sling?
     
    date : May 5, 2008
    author : TriPainter
    comments : 1
    I went into the pool area (as this was a pool swim) and got body marked. That's when it hit me that I was there to race - this was not a clinic.
    date : August 22, 2006
    author : TriathlonRadio
    comments : 0
    In this episode we talk to Coach Joel from the BT.com forums. He talks about recovering after a bike crash and coaching.