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2014-09-25 9:53 AM
in reply to: wannabefaster

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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.
I think of it as 30-40 watts or so difference. It is pretty hard for me to add 30 watts to my FTP at this point as most of the low hanging fruit is gone. If you took 30 watts away from me, I'd still beat the MOP guys on the bike but I'd get crushed by the guys that match my FTP or better it and have a nice setup. It is a fairly substantial measurable difference as you said....but if you had the watts you'd still be pretty fast on the bike regardless just not at the front end. In a 70.3 or 140.6 your losing a decent chunk of time and energy if you are looking to be competitive...off course if you are a stud you can succeed in spite of it.

I like breaking things down to watts though. Figure out the watts saving on all your equipment and the cost (you can get 95+% of the way there at a fraction of the cost that many spend if you are strategic). Tons of articles out there you can reference. All that stuff adds up. I sold my tt bike but when I come back to the TT bike it will be very strategic based on that. You need to be slippery if you want to ride 24-25mph for long periods of time.



2014-09-25 9:58 AM
in reply to: 3mar

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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.
Originally posted by 3mar

Originally posted by schaumi

You guys have engines on your bicycles?!?!

Here I've been a chump all this time using my legs to pedal. No wonder I don't win.


So that's why those fancy bikes are so darn expensive. I can't believe I missed that.


Chumps, totally missed the boat my bike only has 4 cylinders so I still feel at a disadvantage

Actually there is a bike shop in my town that sells bicycles with engines and they got ads on the radio so you can keep up with that faster athlete in your family going up a hill. Its pretty funny.
2014-09-25 9:59 AM
in reply to: wannabefaster

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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.

Originally posted by wannabefaster You have to have parents that support you, help you, can provide the financial means to pursue your athletic dream. 

We talk about this all the time.  There has to be quite a few people in the population who never get the chance to develop their gifts because it's just too expensive for the parents either because they just don't have the money, or won't spend it on what is really a very slim chance for ultimate success (as you say, there are other tickets that have to be punched).  Triathlon is really hard for a lot of families to think about for their kids.  I know of a half dozen kids in a very small area who would be hell on wheels with a chance at triathlon (top level swimmers who have a running gift as well) but the parents hear of the travel costs, equipment costs, coaches, etc. and just say no.  Hell, it's no easy thing just to have your kids in a top level swim program......my bill for two kids is $4800.00 per year with meet fees.....which does not include  travel/lodging/food for out of town/championship meets.

2014-09-25 10:00 AM
in reply to: cstoulil

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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.
I think this post would have caused a lot less controversy if it was titled "PROOF, you don't need a high end bike to be competitive" Which is what I think the OP was saying. The story was about a person that was competitive without spending thousands on a bike. Which is true, you CAN be competitive on a low end road bike if you're fit enough. However, I think titling as it was done, led to the supposition that the OP was saying "here's proof that you don't go any faster on a high end bike" which is how I took it. That, to me, would take a really good study with a solid control group and I think there is enough evidence that the equipment will help and that it's not all about the engine...but mostly about the engine...but again, I don't think that is what the OP was trying to say.
2014-09-25 10:13 AM
in reply to: 3mar

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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.
Originally posted by 3mar

I think this post would have caused a lot less controversy if it was titled "PROOF, you don't need a high end bike to be competitive" Which is what I think the OP was saying. The story was about a person that was competitive without spending thousands on a bike. Which is true, you CAN be competitive on a low end road bike if you're fit enough. However, I think titling as it was done, led to the supposition that the OP was saying "here's proof that you don't go any faster on a high end bike" which is how I took it. That, to me, would take a really good study with a solid control group and I think there is enough evidence that the equipment will help and that it's not all about the engine...but mostly about the engine...but again, I don't think that is what the OP was trying to say.


This makes me think of a ST thread from a few years back. Someone was asking about putting a swim cap over his regular bike helmet to make it more aero. A lot of conversation occurred and there was significant derision toward the original poster...until...he averaged 27 MPH in the HIM race that he tried it out in. That shut up the critics pretty quickly. I think in his instance the equipment mattered much less than the person wearing it (who I am pretty sure has been racing as a pro now for several years--that may have been one of his last AG races).

As you say, proof that you can cush the souls of other competitors with pretty low tech stuff if you are strong enough. I suspect 'he' wears a real aero helmet now. Can't leave any time on the course when you are racing for the win.
2014-09-25 10:31 AM
in reply to: Left Brain

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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.

Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by wannabefaster You have to have parents that support you, help you, can provide the financial means to pursue your athletic dream. 

We talk about this all the time.  There has to be quite a few people in the population who never get the chance to develop their gifts because it's just too expensive for the parents either because they just don't have the money, or won't spend it on what is really a very slim chance for ultimate success (as you say, there are other tickets that have to be punched).  Triathlon is really hard for a lot of families to think about for their kids.  I know of a half dozen kids in a very small area who would be hell on wheels with a chance at triathlon (top level swimmers who have a running gift as well) but the parents hear of the travel costs, equipment costs, coaches, etc. and just say no.  Hell, it's no easy thing just to have your kids in a top level swim program......my bill for two kids is $4800.00 per year with meet fees.....which does not include  travel/lodging/food for out of town/championship meets.

I'll take it a bit further...

I often wonder if we had then next Michael Jordon, Einstein, Payton Manning, Stephen Hawking, Beethoven, Mozart in the world RIGHT NOW, but they are some kid in Somalia that now has to carry and AK47 or on some rice farm in remote China.

I also think if there are people with hidden talents, regardless of social status, they will never find because they are simply not EXPOSED to them.  Hard to be a piano prodigy if you never get a chance to sit down at one or a gifted swimmer if you never tried getting in a pool.

That's why I try all kinds of new things!  Maybe one I'm a hidden prodigy at!  (but I'm starting to have my doubts, lol



2014-09-25 3:18 PM
in reply to: Left Brain

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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.
Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by wannabefaster You have to have parents that support you, help you, can provide the financial means to pursue your athletic dream. 

We talk about this all the time.  There has to be quite a few people in the population who never get the chance to develop their gifts because it's just too expensive for the parents either because they just don't have the money, or won't spend it on what is really a very slim chance for ultimate success (as you say, there are other tickets that have to be punched).  Triathlon is really hard for a lot of families to think about for their kids.  I know of a half dozen kids in a very small area who would be hell on wheels with a chance at triathlon (top level swimmers who have a running gift as well) but the parents hear of the travel costs, equipment costs, coaches, etc. and just say no.  Hell, it's no easy thing just to have your kids in a top level swim program......my bill for two kids is $4800.00 per year with meet fees.....which does not include  travel/lodging/food for out of town/championship meets.




Dang, I thought my pocketbook was going to get a break when my daughter decided to choose swimming over hockey.
2014-09-25 4:00 PM
in reply to: TriJedi


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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.
Originally posted by TriJedi

Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by wannabefaster You have to have parents that support you, help you, can provide the financial means to pursue your athletic dream. 

We talk about this all the time.  There has to be quite a few people in the population who never get the chance to develop their gifts because it's just too expensive for the parents either because they just don't have the money, or won't spend it on what is really a very slim chance for ultimate success (as you say, there are other tickets that have to be punched).  Triathlon is really hard for a lot of families to think about for their kids.  I know of a half dozen kids in a very small area who would be hell on wheels with a chance at triathlon (top level swimmers who have a running gift as well) but the parents hear of the travel costs, equipment costs, coaches, etc. and just say no.  Hell, it's no easy thing just to have your kids in a top level swim program......my bill for two kids is $4800.00 per year with meet fees.....which does not include  travel/lodging/food for out of town/championship meets.




Dang, I thought my pocketbook was going to get a break when my daughter decided to choose swimming over hockey.

Depends a lot on their age. My son who is 10 swim club SC it is $960 the high school fee would be $1560. He doesn't swim LC but if he did it would be an additional $250 or so but for HS it would add another $625.

Instead of swimming LC my son swim on a neighborhood rec team that is only $70... except we need to also purchase a $250 family membership to the pool. But he gets to swim with his classmates and the kids around the area. It would actually be cheaper to swim long course but he has fun going to the local pool.

Equipment wise we probably spend $100 on suits and goggle every 18 months he outgrows them before they wear out. The other stuff (kickboard, fins, bouys, etc) for the most part is a 1 time expense, depending on the pool might not be needed.
2014-09-26 12:18 PM
in reply to: Sidney Porter

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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.
Originally posted by Sidney Porter

Originally posted by TriJedi

Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by wannabefaster You have to have parents that support you, help you, can provide the financial means to pursue your athletic dream. 

We talk about this all the time.  There has to be quite a few people in the population who never get the chance to develop their gifts because it's just too expensive for the parents either because they just don't have the money, or won't spend it on what is really a very slim chance for ultimate success (as you say, there are other tickets that have to be punched).  Triathlon is really hard for a lot of families to think about for their kids.  I know of a half dozen kids in a very small area who would be hell on wheels with a chance at triathlon (top level swimmers who have a running gift as well) but the parents hear of the travel costs, equipment costs, coaches, etc. and just say no.  Hell, it's no easy thing just to have your kids in a top level swim program......my bill for two kids is $4800.00 per year with meet fees.....which does not include  travel/lodging/food for out of town/championship meets.




Dang, I thought my pocketbook was going to get a break when my daughter decided to choose swimming over hockey.

Depends a lot on their age. My son who is 10 swim club SC it is $960 the high school fee would be $1560. He doesn't swim LC but if he did it would be an additional $250 or so but for HS it would add another $625.

Instead of swimming LC my son swim on a neighborhood rec team that is only $70... except we need to also purchase a $250 family membership to the pool. But he gets to swim with his classmates and the kids around the area. It would actually be cheaper to swim long course but he has fun going to the local pool.

Equipment wise we probably spend $100 on suits and goggle every 18 months he outgrows them before they wear out. The other stuff (kickboard, fins, bouys, etc) for the most part is a 1 time expense, depending on the pool might not be needed.


Thanks. She is 8, but is following her brother's lead and starting to make travel teams in a few sports.
2014-09-26 12:32 PM
in reply to: TriJedi

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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.

Originally posted by TriJedi
Originally posted by Sidney Porter
Originally posted by TriJedi
Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by wannabefaster You have to have parents that support you, help you, can provide the financial means to pursue your athletic dream. 

We talk about this all the time.  There has to be quite a few people in the population who never get the chance to develop their gifts because it's just too expensive for the parents either because they just don't have the money, or won't spend it on what is really a very slim chance for ultimate success (as you say, there are other tickets that have to be punched).  Triathlon is really hard for a lot of families to think about for their kids.  I know of a half dozen kids in a very small area who would be hell on wheels with a chance at triathlon (top level swimmers who have a running gift as well) but the parents hear of the travel costs, equipment costs, coaches, etc. and just say no.  Hell, it's no easy thing just to have your kids in a top level swim program......my bill for two kids is $4800.00 per year with meet fees.....which does not include  travel/lodging/food for out of town/championship meets.

Dang, I thought my pocketbook was going to get a break when my daughter decided to choose swimming over hockey.
Depends a lot on their age. My son who is 10 swim club SC it is $960 the high school fee would be $1560. He doesn't swim LC but if he did it would be an additional $250 or so but for HS it would add another $625. Instead of swimming LC my son swim on a neighborhood rec team that is only $70... except we need to also purchase a $250 family membership to the pool. But he gets to swim with his classmates and the kids around the area. It would actually be cheaper to swim long course but he has fun going to the local pool. Equipment wise we probably spend $100 on suits and goggle every 18 months he outgrows them before they wear out. The other stuff (kickboard, fins, bouys, etc) for the most part is a 1 time expense, depending on the pool might not be needed.
Thanks. She is 8, but is following her brother's lead and starting to make travel teams in a few sports.

Yes, 8 and in lower age groups is A LOT cheaper than what I am paying for a 14 year old and 16 year old......one of whom is on the National roster and the other on the Senior II roster.  Fair warning.....it DOESN'T get cheaper! 

2014-09-26 3:04 PM
in reply to: 0

Subject: ...
This user's post has been ignored.

Edited by Fred D 2014-09-26 3:05 PM


2014-10-01 3:21 PM
in reply to: 0

Master
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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.
Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by wannabefaster You have to have parents that support you, help you, can provide the financial means to pursue your athletic dream. 

We talk about this all the time.  There has to be quite a few people in the population who never get the chance to develop their gifts because it's just too expensive for the parents either because they just don't have the money, or won't spend it on what is really a very slim chance for ultimate success (as you say, there are other tickets that have to be punched).  Triathlon is really hard for a lot of families to think about for their kids.  I know of a half dozen kids in a very small area who would be hell on wheels with a chance at triathlon (top level swimmers who have a running gift as well) but the parents hear of the travel costs, equipment costs, coaches, etc. and just say no.  Hell, it's no easy thing just to have your kids in a top level swim program......my bill for two kids is $4800.00 per year with meet fees.....which does not include  travel/lodging/food for out of town/championship meets.





Resurrecting a several day old thread.

I was in the midst of my annual reread of "Once a Runner" and " Again to Carthage" by John L. Parker when I came across the passage that describes this better than I ever could.

So, From "Again to Carthage":

"You don't even get to play unless you have already won the genetic lottery. Then you have to win the nurture lottery, then the happenstance lottery, and then just in general be lucky in every conceivable way, and then you will have earned the right to work your a$$ off like most civilians could never possibly imagine. Then you might----might----get to stand there like a dodo all teary-eyed pretending you know the words to your anthem."



Edited by wannabefaster 2014-10-01 3:22 PM
2014-10-01 3:37 PM
in reply to: wannabefaster

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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.

Originally posted by wannabefaster
Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by wannabefaster You have to have parents that support you, help you, can provide the financial means to pursue your athletic dream. 

We talk about this all the time.  There has to be quite a few people in the population who never get the chance to develop their gifts because it's just too expensive for the parents either because they just don't have the money, or won't spend it on what is really a very slim chance for ultimate success (as you say, there are other tickets that have to be punched).  Triathlon is really hard for a lot of families to think about for their kids.  I know of a half dozen kids in a very small area who would be hell on wheels with a chance at triathlon (top level swimmers who have a running gift as well) but the parents hear of the travel costs, equipment costs, coaches, etc. and just say no.  Hell, it's no easy thing just to have your kids in a top level swim program......my bill for two kids is $4800.00 per year with meet fees.....which does not include  travel/lodging/food for out of town/championship meets.

Resurrecting a several day old thread. I was in the midst of my annual reread of "Once a Runner" and " Again to Carthage" by John L. Parker when I came across the passage that describes this better than I ever could. So, From "Again to Carthage": "You don't even get to play unless you have already won the genetic lottery. Then you have to win the nurture lottery, then the happenstance lottery, and then just in general be lucky in every conceivable way, and then you will have earned the right to work your a$$ off like most civilians could never possibly imagine. Then you might----might----get to stand there like a dodo all teary-eyed pretending you know the words to your anthem."

Funny - my wife and I get asked quite a bit by friends of ours who see our son's success at his young age, "so, is your son going to the Olympics?".  Our answer is always the same, "No".  And, you know what, he's not.  It's just damn near impossible, the odds are so unbelievably against you.  In the end, luck plays an incredible part as you separate the very, very top of any sport.

There is, however, one person I never say "no" to when he talks about his dream.

2014-10-01 3:42 PM
in reply to: Left Brain

Master
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ann arbor, michigan
Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.
Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by wannabefaster
Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by wannabefaster You have to have parents that support you, help you, can provide the financial means to pursue your athletic dream. 

We talk about this all the time.  There has to be quite a few people in the population who never get the chance to develop their gifts because it's just too expensive for the parents either because they just don't have the money, or won't spend it on what is really a very slim chance for ultimate success (as you say, there are other tickets that have to be punched).  Triathlon is really hard for a lot of families to think about for their kids.  I know of a half dozen kids in a very small area who would be hell on wheels with a chance at triathlon (top level swimmers who have a running gift as well) but the parents hear of the travel costs, equipment costs, coaches, etc. and just say no.  Hell, it's no easy thing just to have your kids in a top level swim program......my bill for two kids is $4800.00 per year with meet fees.....which does not include  travel/lodging/food for out of town/championship meets.

Resurrecting a several day old thread. I was in the midst of my annual reread of "Once a Runner" and " Again to Carthage" by John L. Parker when I came across the passage that describes this better than I ever could. So, From "Again to Carthage": "You don't even get to play unless you have already won the genetic lottery. Then you have to win the nurture lottery, then the happenstance lottery, and then just in general be lucky in every conceivable way, and then you will have earned the right to work your a$$ off like most civilians could never possibly imagine. Then you might----might----get to stand there like a dodo all teary-eyed pretending you know the words to your anthem."

Funny - my wife and I get asked quite a bit by friends of ours who see our son's success at his young age, "so, is your son going to the Olympics?".  Our answer is always the same, "No".  And, you know what, he's not.  It's just damn near impossible, the odds are so unbelievably against you.  In the end, luck plays an incredible part as you separate the very, very top of any sport.

There is, however, one person I never say "no" to when he talks about his dream.





2014-10-01 3:55 PM
in reply to: Left Brain

Oakville
Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.

Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by wannabefaster
Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by wannabefaster You have to have parents that support you, help you, can provide the financial means to pursue your athletic dream. 

We talk about this all the time.  There has to be quite a few people in the population who never get the chance to develop their gifts because it's just too expensive for the parents either because they just don't have the money, or won't spend it on what is really a very slim chance for ultimate success (as you say, there are other tickets that have to be punched).  Triathlon is really hard for a lot of families to think about for their kids.  I know of a half dozen kids in a very small area who would be hell on wheels with a chance at triathlon (top level swimmers who have a running gift as well) but the parents hear of the travel costs, equipment costs, coaches, etc. and just say no.  Hell, it's no easy thing just to have your kids in a top level swim program......my bill for two kids is $4800.00 per year with meet fees.....which does not include  travel/lodging/food for out of town/championship meets.

Resurrecting a several day old thread. I was in the midst of my annual reread of "Once a Runner" and " Again to Carthage" by John L. Parker when I came across the passage that describes this better than I ever could. So, From "Again to Carthage": "You don't even get to play unless you have already won the genetic lottery. Then you have to win the nurture lottery, then the happenstance lottery, and then just in general be lucky in every conceivable way, and then you will have earned the right to work your a$$ off like most civilians could never possibly imagine. Then you might----might----get to stand there like a dodo all teary-eyed pretending you know the words to your anthem."

Funny - my wife and I get asked quite a bit by friends of ours who see our son's success at his young age, "so, is your son going to the Olympics?".  Our answer is always the same, "No".  And, you know what, he's not.  It's just damn near impossible, the odds are so unbelievably against you.  In the end, luck plays an incredible part as you separate the very, very top of any sport.

There is, however, one person I never say "no" to when he talks about his dream.

My cousin has twin nephews who growing up excelled at hockey at every level.  They both always led their team in scoring and were in the top few percentile for the league.  He was constantly asked whether they were going to make it to the NHL and his answer was always no.  They played because they enjoyed it and if they were lucky it could help pay for their education.   Last month they both started their first year at an Ivy League school on full hockey scholarships. 

 

2014-10-02 6:26 PM
in reply to: cstoulil

Master
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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.
Fastest AG at IM Choo rode this bike. PROOF it is the bike and not the engine????????????????



(108879-largest_ChrisBordenBike1.jpg)



Attachments
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108879-largest_ChrisBordenBike1.jpg (50KB - 3 downloads)


2014-10-02 6:41 PM
in reply to: pschriver

Master
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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.

Forgot to show the helmet ...

2014-10-02 7:01 PM
in reply to: Left Brain


467
1001001001002525
, Wisconsin
Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.
Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by wannabefaster
Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by wannabefaster You have to have parents that support you, help you, can provide the financial means to pursue your athletic dream. 

We talk about this all the time.  There has to be quite a few people in the population who never get the chance to develop their gifts because it's just too expensive for the parents either because they just don't have the money, or won't spend it on what is really a very slim chance for ultimate success (as you say, there are other tickets that have to be punched).  Triathlon is really hard for a lot of families to think about for their kids.  I know of a half dozen kids in a very small area who would be hell on wheels with a chance at triathlon (top level swimmers who have a running gift as well) but the parents hear of the travel costs, equipment costs, coaches, etc. and just say no.  Hell, it's no easy thing just to have your kids in a top level swim program......my bill for two kids is $4800.00 per year with meet fees.....which does not include  travel/lodging/food for out of town/championship meets.

Resurrecting a several day old thread. I was in the midst of my annual reread of "Once a Runner" and " Again to Carthage" by John L. Parker when I came across the passage that describes this better than I ever could. So, From "Again to Carthage": "You don't even get to play unless you have already won the genetic lottery. Then you have to win the nurture lottery, then the happenstance lottery, and then just in general be lucky in every conceivable way, and then you will have earned the right to work your a$$ off like most civilians could never possibly imagine. Then you might----might----get to stand there like a dodo all teary-eyed pretending you know the words to your anthem."

Funny - my wife and I get asked quite a bit by friends of ours who see our son's success at his young age, "so, is your son going to the Olympics?".  Our answer is always the same, "No".  And, you know what, he's not.  It's just damn near impossible, the odds are so unbelievably against you.  In the end, luck plays an incredible part as you separate the very, very top of any sport.

There is, however, one person I never say "no" to when he talks about his dream.




Since it's his dream, you just never know what he'll create Of course, without having you and your wife supporting him, it wouldn't even be close. And, even if that "dream" doesn't exactly happen, it will morph into something else equally or even more beautiful. . . .
I've got to find my copy of those two books by Parker again, I really loved them!
2014-10-02 8:06 PM
in reply to: 0

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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.

Originally posted by MikeD1
Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by wannabefaster
Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by wannabefaster You have to have parents that support you, help you, can provide the financial means to pursue your athletic dream. 

We talk about this all the time.  There has to be quite a few people in the population who never get the chance to develop their gifts because it's just too expensive for the parents either because they just don't have the money, or won't spend it on what is really a very slim chance for ultimate success (as you say, there are other tickets that have to be punched).  Triathlon is really hard for a lot of families to think about for their kids.  I know of a half dozen kids in a very small area who would be hell on wheels with a chance at triathlon (top level swimmers who have a running gift as well) but the parents hear of the travel costs, equipment costs, coaches, etc. and just say no.  Hell, it's no easy thing just to have your kids in a top level swim program......my bill for two kids is $4800.00 per year with meet fees.....which does not include  travel/lodging/food for out of town/championship meets.

Resurrecting a several day old thread. I was in the midst of my annual reread of "Once a Runner" and " Again to Carthage" by John L. Parker when I came across the passage that describes this better than I ever could. So, From "Again to Carthage": "You don't even get to play unless you have already won the genetic lottery. Then you have to win the nurture lottery, then the happenstance lottery, and then just in general be lucky in every conceivable way, and then you will have earned the right to work your a$$ off like most civilians could never possibly imagine. Then you might----might----get to stand there like a dodo all teary-eyed pretending you know the words to your anthem."

Funny - my wife and I get asked quite a bit by friends of ours who see our son's success at his young age, "so, is your son going to the Olympics?".  Our answer is always the same, "No".  And, you know what, he's not.  It's just damn near impossible, the odds are so unbelievably against you.  In the end, luck plays an incredible part as you separate the very, very top of any sport.

There is, however, one person I never say "no" to when he talks about his dream.

Since it's his dream, you just never know what he'll create Of course, without having you and your wife supporting him, it wouldn't even be close. And, even if that "dream" doesn't exactly happen, it will morph into something else equally or even more beautiful. . . . I've got to find my copy of those two books by Parker again, I really loved them!

Yeah, he will occasionally say, "dad, I'm going to the Olympics someday".....my answer to him is always the same as well.  I simply say, "then go, dude".  He will be race age 18 next year and his dream is still very much alive.......it's a joy to watch.



Edited by Left Brain 2014-10-02 8:14 PM
2014-10-03 10:32 AM
in reply to: pschriver

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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.

Originally posted by pschriver Fastest AG at IM Choo rode this bike. PROOF it is the bike and not the engine????????????????

Dang that bike is hot!

2014-10-03 10:52 AM
in reply to: msteiner

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In front of computer when typing this.
Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.
Originally posted by msteiner

Originally posted by pschriver Fastest AG at IM Choo rode this bike. PROOF it is the bike and not the engine????????????????

Dang that bike is hot!




No way I would ride that! Then I couldn't say "see, its the engine" when I pass old people on cruisers at the beach!


2014-10-03 2:38 PM
in reply to: cstoulil

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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.
Originally posted by cstoulil

Wow I didn't know this post would cause such an uprising here on BT. I didn't say the enigine was the only thing that matters. All things are important in the equation.


Ignore the haters. If these literal-minded uninspiring people ran things, we wouldn't have ever gotten to the moon. We'd still be fighting Neanderthals.

It's a great, inspiring story, and people picking nits are being silly.
2014-10-03 2:50 PM
in reply to: neuronet

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Subject: RE: PROOF, it's the engine that matters.

and breeding with them

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