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2014-08-31 5:43 PM

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Elite
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Subject: educate a teacher about jobs

HI community. I have been a teacher for 16 years now, various subjects and ages 5-14. Before that in college and high school I did camps.  But I have not done any other jobs, and don't really have a sense of what a "real job" is like, or what I would even be qualified to do.

I am thinking of changes careers, mainly because my profession is changing and the demands/expectations are just becoming overwhelming.  My brother always suggests software trainer, but I have a friend (KSH--hi!) that tells me it is a fairly volatile field. do you have any other suggestions that a teacher would be qualified for?

Thanks!



2014-08-31 6:08 PM
in reply to: turtlegirl

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Atlanta, Georgia
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs

What subject(s) did you teach? 

Not saying you could just grab one of those jobs without any schooling or training, but I've seen people move into these types of careers and transition well, without much or any prior background:

HR
Supply Chain
Project Management
Sales
Administration
Retail/restaurant management

I will tell you though, in my experience at least, that unless you get a low-skill or low-responsibility job, I think every career is going to have "demands/expectations that become overwhelming."

2014-08-31 6:26 PM
in reply to: turtlegirl

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Master
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Eugene, Oregon
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs
Is overseas/international teaching a possibility? There are still a lot of responsibilities and it's vey competitive (plus no union so hours can be pretty mich limitless sometimes), but there doesn't seem to be quite the focus on high stakes testing that you find in the US, most schools are well-funded with smaller class sizes than in American public schools, there's an interesting community of colleagues and parents, and many of the cultures represented in the school place a higher value on education than the US. The pay is pretty much on a par with what you'd earn in the States, and in many cases, expenses are lower. If interested, I'd start by signing up with a recruitment agency like Search Associates or ISS. They have job fairs in different locations including the US, so you can interview with multiple schools. It also helps to go through an agency as they vet the schools before listing them--there are some less than srcupulous wanna-be "international schools" out there, particularly in the developing world, and unless you know the red flags to look for, it's easy to get duped.
2014-08-31 8:15 PM
in reply to: lisac957

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Elite
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Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs

Well, I'm talking about the testing levels, increasing demands of helicopter parents, those school specific demands that are taking everything I enjoyed about teaching out.  There is no individualism any more, all classrooms are to look the same, test scores have to improve, and yet you don't have any support from parents along with no chance to really advance. Our step scale is almost a horizontal ramp. I had to leave the public schools mainly b/c I felt like I was selling my soul to the devil (kids really have more needs than high test scores, like actually having winter coats and lunch).  Now the private schools are looking more and more like public schools but at 75% the pay of public schools. sigh.

So I was willing to take the reduced money to feel like I'm actually teaching, but its starting to change to wear I can see the writing on the wall.  Does that make sense?

Oh I've taught kindergarten, PE, middle school science, middle school math, and 4th grade.

2014-08-31 10:09 PM
in reply to: Hot Runner

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Master
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Beijing
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs

Originally posted by Hot Runner Is overseas/international teaching a possibility? There are still a lot of responsibilities and it's vey competitive (plus no union so hours can be pretty mich limitless sometimes), but there doesn't seem to be quite the focus on high stakes testing that you find in the US, most schools are well-funded with smaller class sizes than in American public schools, there's an interesting community of colleagues and parents, and many of the cultures represented in the school place a higher value on education than the US. The pay is pretty much on a par with what you'd earn in the States, and in many cases, expenses are lower. If interested, I'd start by signing up with a recruitment agency like Search Associates or ISS. They have job fairs in different locations including the US, so you can interview with multiple schools. It also helps to go through an agency as they vet the schools before listing them--there are some less than srcupulous wanna-be "international schools" out there, particularly in the developing world, and unless you know the red flags to look for, it's easy to get duped.

 

I was going to suggest an international assignment as well.   Many of my kids' teachers have been absolutely FABULOUS, seem to enjoy the school we're at, and it seems like every time we travel on a school holiday, we see at least one of the teachers jetting off to some SE Asia locale for a nice vacation. 

 

Might be a good option to "charge the batteries" so-to-speak.    Plus, the international experience always looks good on a resume. 

2014-09-01 7:41 AM
in reply to: moondawg14

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Expert
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Oklahoma
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs
What about going into school counseling or administration? I'm a school counselor and psychometrist and even though test scores play a big part in my job I spend the majority of my time working with students that have much bigger issues than how they perform on standardized testing.


2014-09-01 8:29 AM
in reply to: turtlegirl

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Master
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Somewhere on the Tennessee River
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs

If you don't already have a masters degree then I would recommend you go back to school.  This will qualify you to teach at a community college level.    It's much more rewarding and the administrations are usually not so draconian. 

2014-09-01 11:01 AM
in reply to: MadMathemagician

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Elite
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Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs
As a teacher I'm embarrassed I wrote wear instead of where. If I only had my red pen!!
2014-09-01 6:18 PM
in reply to: 0

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Master
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Eugene, Oregon
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs
LOL I almost always post from my I-pad and am horrible at typing on it. (Forget about smaller devices--I don't buy them.) Just hope no would-be adminstrators see all my typos. I actually do know how to spell! (Had to edit to capitalize the I!)

Edited by Hot Runner 2014-09-01 6:19 PM
2014-09-01 6:32 PM
in reply to: turtlegirl

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Veteran
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The Woodlands, Texas
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs
I'm a teacher myself and get where you're coming from. What about getting your masters (if you haven't already) and teach at a local/community college for the summer? Once you get your foot in the door, you could land a full time position possibly. It's still teaching, but a different level. Or, since you are an athlete, what about personal training/coaching?

I wish you the best if luck in your search !
2014-09-02 6:51 AM
in reply to: rach5928

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Champion
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the alamo city, Texas
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs

just remember, that all jobs are full of bureaucracy and bullcrap.  if you truly love teaching, kids out there need you, it is a gift and a passion that not many have.  i am rated and reviewed on plenty of ridiculous things that i have no control over.  the grass is not always greener...



2014-09-02 7:38 AM
in reply to: mehaner

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Master
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Southwest Iowa
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs

Originally posted by mehaner

just remember, that all jobs are full of bureaucracy and bullcrap.  if you truly love teaching, kids out there need you, it is a gift and a passion that not many have.  i am rated and reviewed on plenty of ridiculous things that i have no control over.  the grass is not always greener...

^^^^^  THIS  ^^^^^

If you don't want the  bureaucracy and BS.  Start your own business and work the hours that you need to survive.  I have no idea what that job would be for you, but definitely not the hobby you enjoy, because when it becomes your full time job and not a hobby, you really begin to dislike something you used to love to do.

2014-09-02 9:26 AM
in reply to: flip18436572

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Elite
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Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs

I completely get the bureaucracy part, but you understand that I'm dealing with parents and thats a completely different realm! Momma bears and Papa lions.

Counseling would be a great change, but that would require a second masters and thats just not in the financial cards right now. I asked a friend that is 5 years behind me in teaching in the public schools and she is currently making $15k more than I am (our schools are 3 miles apart, but its public vs. private).  There is something to be said for doing what you love, but when its a financial strain constantly (every other teacher in my school is married and so their income is not the only source of income), it becomes stressful.  I've given and bent and scrimped...but when you realize you can't get ahead, something has to change. 

I absolutely love working with kids, ideally I'd do something more in the line with field trips that combined my PE/Science and education background. I have my degree in Elementary Ed and Masters in PE and Exercise Science.

2014-09-02 9:50 AM
in reply to: turtlegirl

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Atlanta, Georgia
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs

Originally posted by turtlegirl

I completely get the bureaucracy part, but you understand that I'm dealing with parents and thats a completely different realm! Momma bears and Papa lions.

I think some of us are trying to say that EVERY job and career have these type of hurdles. Momma bears and Papa lions just come in different forms (office politics, board members, mean bosses, clueless bosses, micro managers, unrealistic expectations, unexpected/forced change, etc.). 

I admire you for taking these first steps to think it through - I completely understand needing a change and hope you find a solution.

2014-09-02 10:29 AM
in reply to: lisac957

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the alamo city, Texas
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs

Originally posted by lisac957

Originally posted by turtlegirl

I completely get the bureaucracy part, but you understand that I'm dealing with parents and thats a completely different realm! Momma bears and Papa lions.

I think some of us are trying to say that EVERY job and career have these type of hurdles. Momma bears and Papa lions just come in different forms (office politics, board members, mean bosses, clueless bosses, micro managers, unrealistic expectations, unexpected/forced change, etc.). 

I admire you for taking these first steps to think it through - I completely understand needing a change and hope you find a solution.

exactly.  your parents are your customers.  my customers are BMW and Ford.  i promise you, it is the same thing.  i get phone calls on weekends.  i get challenged to meet impossible requirements.  i get no cooperation or compromise from them.

2014-09-02 10:52 AM
in reply to: mehaner

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Expert
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Evergreen, Colorado
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs

Originally posted by mehaner

Originally posted by lisac957

Originally posted by turtlegirl

I completely get the bureaucracy part, but you understand that I'm dealing with parents and thats a completely different realm! Momma bears and Papa lions.

I think some of us are trying to say that EVERY job and career have these type of hurdles. Momma bears and Papa lions just come in different forms (office politics, board members, mean bosses, clueless bosses, micro managers, unrealistic expectations, unexpected/forced change, etc.). 

I admire you for taking these first steps to think it through - I completely understand needing a change and hope you find a solution.

exactly.  your parents are your customers.  my customers are BMW and Ford.  i promise you, it is the same thing.  i get phone calls on weekends.  i get challenged to meet impossible requirements.  i get no cooperation or compromise from them.

I agree with this. I used to work in a corporate world where the ranking and reviewing process was somewhat frustrating, and certain clients were more than difficult. I quit my job and made the hobby I love (art) my job. In my case it works - I *love* what I do now, but I will say that EVERY job and career has those frustrations. I just traded one set for another. In my case, I'm the boss and I work from home and I make pretty paintings for a living, but I still have to deal with demanding shows, galleries that don't pay on time, customers that want you to bend over backwards for them (I've never seen anyone more demanding than folks who commission a $7,000 painting that has to be "just so" for their zillion dollar house), etc etc. The difference is that now I at least care deeply about what I do, so the BS is worth it.

So, whatever you do, pick something you care about enough to make the BS worth it. You sound like a great teacher, very invested in what you do. Maybe an international assignment or something that's still related would be good for you. I'd hate to see you switch over to something like HR or sales in a corporate job, find that there's just a whole other set of BS that's frustrating, and then find that on top of the BS you just don't even care. 



2014-09-02 12:08 PM
in reply to: turtlegirl

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Expert
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Oklahoma
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs
Originally posted by turtlegirl

I completely get the bureaucracy part, but you understand that I'm dealing with parents and thats a completely different realm! Momma bears and Papa lions.

Counseling would be a great change, but that would require a second masters and thats just not in the financial cards right now. I asked a friend that is 5 years behind me in teaching in the public schools and she is currently making $15k more than I am (our schools are 3 miles apart, but its public vs. private).  There is something to be said for doing what you love, but when its a financial strain constantly (every other teacher in my school is married and so their income is not the only source of income), it becomes stressful.  I've given and bent and scrimped...but when you realize you can't get ahead, something has to change. 

I absolutely love working with kids, ideally I'd do something more in the line with field trips that combined my PE/Science and education background. I have my degree in Elementary Ed and Masters in PE and Exercise Science.




With your masters have you thought about coaching? I'm a school counselor and Psychometrist but I coach Jrh/HS wrestling too. Coaching has added some extra income and also is a way to build some pretty cool relationships with kids.
2014-09-02 2:41 PM
in reply to: EKH

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Champion
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Williamston, Michigan
Gold member
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs

Originally posted by EKH
Originally posted by turtlegirl

I completely get the bureaucracy part, but you understand that I'm dealing with parents and thats a completely different realm! Momma bears and Papa lions.

Counseling would be a great change, but that would require a second masters and thats just not in the financial cards right now. I asked a friend that is 5 years behind me in teaching in the public schools and she is currently making $15k more than I am (our schools are 3 miles apart, but its public vs. private).  There is something to be said for doing what you love, but when its a financial strain constantly (every other teacher in my school is married and so their income is not the only source of income), it becomes stressful.  I've given and bent and scrimped...but when you realize you can't get ahead, something has to change. 

I absolutely love working with kids, ideally I'd do something more in the line with field trips that combined my PE/Science and education background. I have my degree in Elementary Ed and Masters in PE and Exercise Science.

With your masters have you thought about coaching? I'm a school counselor and Psychometrist but I coach Jrh/HS wrestling too. Coaching has added some extra income and also is a way to build some pretty cool relationships with kids.

Personal trainer? Start your own side business focusing on kids and helping them get better at sports.  Once it takes off give up your day job. 

2014-09-02 2:58 PM
in reply to: Socks

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Expert
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Central New Jersey
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs
I too am struggling with my job right now. I have a new manager and she doesn't manage - I used to be (am) 1 of her assistants but she doesn't utilize the skills I have - if I wasn't working on some special projects with our corporate office I think I would leave...I LOVE my interactions with the people but the manager makes it miserable....

I am exploring some options - hubby won't let me coach (USAT certified) looking at CPR instructor...maybe working at the bike shop? doing something I LOVE again
2014-09-02 7:21 PM
in reply to: 0

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Elite
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Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs

Lets just say that I'd be willing to put up with more BS if I wasn't financially struggling.

 

Honestly I'd stay if I could afford to. I love the school, I love the families.  But I really do need more money.

 

Sue, I'd actually have to be in shape to be a trainer, ha!  And unfortunately we get out a bit too late to do any high school or middle school coaching, but I would love to do swim lessons or swim team.  That may be something worth pursuing.  



Edited by turtlegirl 2014-09-02 7:24 PM
2014-09-02 8:08 PM
in reply to: #5045514

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Extreme Veteran
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The Woodlands/Magnolia, TX.
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs
A career is a seesaw with money and happiness on opposing sides. The right balance is unique to each of us. It seems like so many of us expect too much happiness from our jobs, I know I'm guilty. In my mind, a job is a job. Some people are lucky enough to be able to do what truly makes them happy and make a killing at the same time, but the other 90% of us have to balance the two because they don't correlate like we wish they would.

Like Lisa said, the corporate world is no different than schools in this regard. It's a balancing act....money and happiness...

That being said....I've seen several ex - teachers excel in corporate training, resourcing, employee development, and other similar roles in the corporate world. Corporations, at least ones I'm familiar with, place a lot of value on the alternative perspective professional educators bring to the business world. And if you have bit of business savy, you can pick up a pretty nice job at just a bit any fortune 500 company. But, are you willing to work 40+HR weeks all year long, report to 4 different bosses, deal with office politics and the likes to make more money? Same seesaw....different profession. Such is life.

Tough decision and only you'll know the right answer. Don't hurt to look around though! Know your options before you make a move!!!!


2014-09-03 10:19 AM
in reply to: antlimon166

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Atlanta, Georgia
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs

Originally posted by antlimon166 A career is a seesaw with money and happiness on opposing sides. The right balance is unique to each of us. It seems like so many of us expect too much happiness from our jobs, I know I'm guilty. In my mind, a job is a job. Some people are lucky enough to be able to do what truly makes them happy and make a killing at the same time, but the other 90% of us have to balance the two because they don't correlate like we wish they would. Like Lisa said, the corporate world is no different than schools in this regard. It's a balancing act....money and happiness... That being said....I've seen several ex - teachers excel in corporate training, resourcing, employee development, and other similar roles in the corporate world. Corporations, at least ones I'm familiar with, place a lot of value on the alternative perspective professional educators bring to the business world. And if you have bit of business savy, you can pick up a pretty nice job at just a bit any fortune 500 company. But, are you willing to work 40+HR weeks all year long, report to 4 different bosses, deal with office politics and the likes to make more money? Same seesaw....different profession. Such is life. Tough decision and only you'll know the right answer. Don't hurt to look around though! Know your options before you make a move!!!!

This is a GREAT point. At the bigger companies I've worked for, there are dedicated employee development, talent management and leadership development/training professionals on the HR staff full time. They also contract out for folks to come in and give training to teams or groups as needed. 

2014-09-03 12:59 PM
in reply to: lisac957

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Champion
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Dallas, TX
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs

Hi Amy, we've spoken about this before and some of this might be repetitive... but if you want to get into corporate training, I would suggest checking out the ASTD. They offer some online training programs, so you could get some education specifically in the field, that would help you on your job search.  

With that said, the field is volatile. Once a company starts to lose money, the departments that only SPEND money and don't MAKE money get reduced or cut all together. As we discussed, since 2008 I have worked for 6 companies, and out of 3 of those jobs, I was laid off from them (2 of them lasting less than 6 months). Luckily though, I do find a new job, because there are a lot of training and development jobs where I live and I have been in the field since 1997 (and have a Master's degree in it, and a certificate in Technical Writing). 

Is there a ceiling on what I can earn? Absolutely. I've pretty much reached it at this point. The only way I'll make more money before I die, is by going into management, which I can't seem to get into (I'm certain it's based on my personality - which is all my fault). 

2014-09-03 8:23 PM
in reply to: antlimon166

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Elite
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200010005001001002525
Subject: RE: educate a teacher about jobs

Originally posted by antlimon166 A career is a seesaw with money and happiness on opposing sides. The right balance is unique to each of us. It seems like so many of us expect too much happiness from our jobs, I know I'm guilty. In my mind, a job is a job. Some people are lucky enough to be able to do what truly makes them happy and make a killing at the same time, but the other 90% of us have to balance the two because they don't correlate like we wish they would. Like Lisa said, the corporate world is no different than schools in this regard. It's a balancing act....money and happiness... That being said....I've seen several ex - teachers excel in corporate training, resourcing, employee development, and other similar roles in the corporate world. Corporations, at least ones I'm familiar with, place a lot of value on the alternative perspective professional educators bring to the business world. And if you have bit of business savy, you can pick up a pretty nice job at just a bit any fortune 500 company. But, are you willing to work 40+HR weeks all year long, report to 4 different bosses, deal with office politics and the likes to make more money? Same seesaw....different profession. Such is life. Tough decision and only you'll know the right answer. Doesn't hurt to look around though! Know your options before you make a move!!!!

 

exactly! I do get happiness from my job.  But its just not really keeping up with the cost of living.  I just wanted to get an idea of the kind of things I could look at, since I'm not knowledgeable about other fields. 

I just may need to do something as simple as more back to my own classroom, and a younger grade.  But I just want to do research before I jump into anything.  

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