General Discussion Triathlon Talk » So I want to dabble with a road bike Rss Feed  
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2016-05-27 12:16 PM

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Pfafftown, NC
Subject: So I want to dabble with a road bike
I've got friends who don't do tris I'd like to ride with.....and I don't want to have to ride my tri bike (although I love my P2) all the time.

I've been looking at a few different bikes. My must-haves are:

1. 11-speed
2. Relaxed geometry (just not too aggressive)

I've looked at the Domane and the Roubaix. They seem expensive, even with 5800. The Cervelo R2 is priced pretty fairly, I think. How aggressive is its geometry?

Any other suggestions? I think the R2 can be bought for "around" $1500 (with 5800).


2016-05-27 12:45 PM
in reply to: nc452010

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Champion
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Knoxville area
Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike
with the right tire, saddle and bar tape choice pretty much any bike you choose can be pretty comfy.
The cervelo is in the same "division" as the others.
2016-05-27 12:48 PM
in reply to: nc452010

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Master
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Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike

I also wanted to be able to ride with others and got a roadie. I got the Ruby, which is the ladies version of the Roubaix. I bought it new but got last years model so it was about $1200.  I like that it is carbon and has the 105. It is a comfortable ride and I'm glad I got it.

2016-05-27 12:50 PM
in reply to: Leegoocrap

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Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike
I have a Cannondale CAAD 10 which I highly recommend. It's very reliable and comfortable.
2016-05-27 1:05 PM
in reply to: 0

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Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike
Originally posted by Leegoocrap

with the right tire, saddle and bar tape choice pretty much any bike you choose can be pretty comfy.
The cervelo is in the same "division" as the others.


With all due respect, this is entirely not true. A bit of background: I'm a life-long cyclist, and have raced everything from road, to mountain, to BMX. I can talk bikes all day, don't ask me about swimming or running. Haha...

I'll give you three examples of bikes I currently have hanging in my garage (don't ask why I have three high end road bikes, I have a bit of a problem).

1. Giant Propel Carbon: http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-ca/bikes/model/propel.advanced.pro...
2. Cannondale Synapse Carbon: http://www.cannondale.com/en/International/Bike/ProductDetail?Id=95... (Note: mine is a 2014, but the frame is the same as this)
3. Cannondale SuperSix EVO RED Carbon: http://www.cannondale.com/en/International/Bike/ProductDetail?Id=f0...

All three have very different feels.

Currently, my bike of choice is the SuperSix. Why?

1. My previous road bike was the Cannondale Synapse Red (above). It was SUPER comfortable over long distances. I do one even every year that is a single day 400 KM day, and this bike was awesome, in terms of comfort. Also great in all the lead-up training. Very plush, yet extremely responsive. Comfort wise, felt like my previous ride (Trek Madone, shown in my profile pic), but responded like a race bike when climbing.

2. I switched to the SuperSix due to a great deal through my race team, and because I wanted to race some road / crit this year. What I didn't expect was that the bike would be nearly as comfortable as the Synapse, but even more agile.

3. I bought the Giant in early 2015 w/ the intention of possibly using it as my tri-bike and for Ironman this year. I've ridden it about 10 times, and in those, I felt beat-up every-time after. It is a far stiffer ride. Responsive, yes. Fast, no doubt. Built for comfort? Not at all.

I'm a bigger guy, 5'11", and last year around 195 lbs. Now I'm 185, and the Giant is even more uncomfortable.

Different strokes for different folks, but not all frames and set-ups are created equally. Do your research, get opinions from shop guys and friends. Above all, yes, get your favorite tape and saddle, and some 25C tires, but really, get it professionally fitted.



Edited by MikeMeade08 2016-05-27 1:33 PM
2016-05-27 1:16 PM
in reply to: MikeMeade08

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Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike
Yeah.....I'm an even bigger guy (6'1" - 190#'s). I'll also be 52 this year.

I'm looking for something to have fun riding. Relaxed geometry is a must-have. Something that won't beat me up is a must-have.


2016-05-27 1:25 PM
in reply to: nc452010

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Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike
Then I highly recommend you look at the "Endurance" models.

The big brands (C'Dale, Trek, Giant, Specialized) all have a version of their Endurance bike. I'd also say go carbon.

When we were young, us big guys could ride a stiff aluminum bike and make that thing sing. Now that we're old, we need to play to the tune of our bodies a bit more.

As a side note: I'll be racing my SuperSix at Ironman Canada this year. It's dressed up and disguised as a Tri Bike, though, and it's been fantastic in 2 pre-rides of the course.
2016-05-27 2:14 PM
in reply to: 0

Master
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, California
Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike

25 tires do wonders for smoothing out a ride on subpar roads.  Roubaix is a nice bike for that also, but I don't really know what price difference you're looking at.



Edited by spudone 2016-05-27 2:15 PM
2016-05-27 3:27 PM
in reply to: #5184226


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Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike
More big brands I didn't see already mentioned with endurance models are felt and bmc.
2016-05-27 5:19 PM
in reply to: MikeMeade08

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Pro
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Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike
Originally posted by MikeMeade08

Then I highly recommend you look at the "Endurance" models.



I really don't know if I agree with the "endurance" models as a general recommendation... Take something like a Pinarello F8; definitely not an endurance bike per se, but incredibly comfortable. Parlee Z5, again not an endurance bike, but another one that I can pretty much ride forever. Before looking into specific types of bikes and getting "stuck" on one type, make sure it works well with your fit. When you talk to your fitter, be absolutely honest with your goals, current issues/injuries, type of riding, etc. Any fitter worth it would be able to recommend a good bike based on your fit and interview information.
2016-05-27 5:38 PM
in reply to: nc452010

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Master
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Bellevue, WA
Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike

Originally posted by nc452010 I've got friends who don't do tris I'd like to ride with.....and I don't want to have to ride my tri bike (although I love my P2) all the time. I've been looking at a few different bikes. My must-haves are: 1. 11-speed 2. Relaxed geometry (just not too aggressive) I've looked at the Domane and the Roubaix. They seem expensive, even with 5800. The Cervelo R2 is priced pretty fairly, I think. How aggressive is its geometry? Any other suggestions? I think the R2 can be bought for "around" $1500 (with 5800).

I've owned a carbon Trek 5200 since 2003, and I've been looking for a new road bike on and off for a few years.

A few months ago decided on a high end Roubaix and bought one with disc brakes, Ultregra DI2 for $4500.  The word for this bike is "smooth".  It rides smooth, soaking up the chipseal and the crappy Seattle pavement and the bumps. It shift smoothly; electronic shifting is great.  It brakes smoothly, the modulation you can get with disc brakes is far better than rim calipers.

I rode a Domane several times and I preferred the Roubaix by quite a bit.  Plus the Roubaix was quite a bit cheaper when outfitted the way I wanted with Di2.

BTW, you're in the dead zone for bike pricing at $1500.  You can get ok bikes for a lot less, or great bikes for a few hundred more. But at $1500, you're going to get stripped-down versions of great bikes. Crappy drivetrains, no name parts, etc.  Break out some more coin and get a bike you love to ride.

Here's a $2500 Roubaix with disc brakes and Ultegra. http://www.greggscycles.com/product/specialized-roubaix-sl4-comp-di... Nice bike and you'd ride around with a smile on your face. 

 



2016-05-29 8:36 AM
in reply to: nc452010


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Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike
Originally posted by nc452010

Yeah.....I'm an even bigger guy (6'1" - 190#'s). I'll also be 52 this year.

I'm looking for something to have fun riding. Relaxed geometry is a must-have. Something that won't beat me up is a must-have.



Lots of things you can do to make a bike comfortable. After a bike fitting, I waited while the fitter/mechanic did some more work. He asked if I wanted to ride his bike. Yes, I said. It was a Bianchi Impulso with tubeless 28mm tires, gel bar tape, and a Syntace P6 seat post. I have never been on a smoother riding bike. Don't need a Bianchi bike to do that but between the tires, bar tape, and seat post. Wow!
2016-05-29 7:45 PM
in reply to: MikeMeade08

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Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike
Originally posted by MikeMeade08

Stuff



I suspect if you were blindfolded put on those different bikes with the same tires, tape and saddle with the same fit... you'd have no idea which you were on.

Maybe you can. I doubt it. Very much. But if you say you can, I'll take your word for it.

There's a thread on slowtwitch where just such a thing was tested on someone who was sure he knew the difference (I believe between a Cervelo R series and an S series.) He didn't. It was worth searching up if interested.
2016-05-30 3:28 AM
in reply to: Leegoocrap

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Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike

Originally posted by Leegoocrap
Originally posted by MikeMeade08 Stuff
I suspect if you were blindfolded put on those different bikes with the same tires, tape and saddle with the same fit... you'd have no idea which you were on. Maybe you can. I doubt it. Very much. But if you say you can, I'll take your word for it. There's a thread on slowtwitch where just such a thing was tested on someone who was sure he knew the difference (I believe between a Cervelo R series and an S series.) He didn't. It was worth searching up if interested.

I believe Josh posted about when he used to work at Zipp that they did similar tests with a bunch of pro riders with the same results - they just couldn't tell the difference if they couldn't see the bikes.

2016-05-30 11:00 PM
in reply to: axteraa

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Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike

Originally posted by axteraa

Originally posted by Leegoocrap
Originally posted by MikeMeade08 Stuff
I suspect if you were blindfolded put on those different bikes with the same tires, tape and saddle with the same fit... you'd have no idea which you were on. Maybe you can. I doubt it. Very much. But if you say you can, I'll take your word for it. There's a thread on slowtwitch where just such a thing was tested on someone who was sure he knew the difference (I believe between a Cervelo R series and an S series.) He didn't. It was worth searching up if interested.

I believe Josh posted about when he used to work at Zipp that they did similar tests with a bunch of pro riders with the same results - they just couldn't tell the difference if they couldn't see the bikes.

Yeah, when it comes down to someone looking for a secondary bike just to have fun and doesn't have an unlimited budget...I don't see a need to buy a specific frame type like a roubaix, synapse, etc..  Consider one of the newer aluminum road bikes that can run 28 mm tires and get a good fit with relaxed position in mind and there shouldn't be much of an issue.  But if you want to spend more on carbon, or a specific geometry frame for a bike you won't race or won't focus most of you're riding on then that is certainly your choice.  

2016-05-31 7:21 AM
in reply to: Jason N

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Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike
Originally posted by Jason N

Originally posted by axteraa

Originally posted by Leegoocrap
Originally posted by MikeMeade08 Stuff
I suspect if you were blindfolded put on those different bikes with the same tires, tape and saddle with the same fit... you'd have no idea which you were on. Maybe you can. I doubt it. Very much. But if you say you can, I'll take your word for it. There's a thread on slowtwitch where just such a thing was tested on someone who was sure he knew the difference (I believe between a Cervelo R series and an S series.) He didn't. It was worth searching up if interested.

I believe Josh posted about when he used to work at Zipp that they did similar tests with a bunch of pro riders with the same results - they just couldn't tell the difference if they couldn't see the bikes.

Yeah, when it comes down to someone looking for a secondary bike just to have fun and doesn't have an unlimited budget...I don't see a need to buy a specific frame type like a roubaix, synapse, etc..  Consider one of the newer aluminum road bikes that can run 28 mm tires and get a good fit with relaxed position in mind and there shouldn't be much of an issue.  But if you want to spend more on carbon, or a specific geometry frame for a bike you won't race or won't focus most of you're riding on then that is certainly your choice.  




Agreed^^^

People instantly want to go to carbon bikes and make the statement that they are more comfortable. Carbon, steel, Al Titanium are the materials that are generally used it does not dictate how comfortable a bike is; that depends on the bike design. I have an AL road bike and have no issues with comfort, have done plenty of centuries on it. My son tested a bunch of bike last years, carbon and AL, he bought a Specialized Aluminum bike in the end. It was the perfect blend of comfort and performance.

If you really want a bike that is perfect for you go get a Titanium or Steel bike custom made, they will make it as stiff as you want it.

You would probably be very happy with an aluminum bike that had 25mm tire on it and 105 components all for about $1300. If you can find a left over you can get it for under $1000.

You are in no hurry, go visit a couple shops and ride 5 or 6 different bikes, you will find one the talks to you.


2016-05-31 9:05 AM
in reply to: mike761

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Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike
I appreciate the advice. I'm also looking down the road...........beyond Triathlon. I'd like to find a good bike and hold onto it. I see my riding, after next year, moving towards more group riding.
2016-05-31 11:56 PM
in reply to: nc452010

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Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike
https://youtu.be/U_pRXBp1H7M?list=FLkJZO5tmSPpHelqb_APjLQg

As long as you are riding it for recreation and not racing, who cares how fast it goes?

Bike Radar recommends the Specialized Allez as the best all around bike. It does come with a SRAM 11 speed drive train.

Their second place is the Cannondale CAAD 8. I personally ride a Cannondale CAAD 8 and I highly recommend it.
2016-06-01 9:00 AM
in reply to: nc452010

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Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike
My opinion, look at a cyclocross bike for your next bike. Riding with a group on the road, put some good street tires on the bike and you'll give up little to nothing in terms of speed and it will leave you with more options. If any of your group ride buddies races cyclocross you will eventually get sucked in so just make it your second bike instead of your third.
2016-06-01 12:49 PM
in reply to: nc452010

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Master
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Rural Ontario
Subject: RE: So I want to dabble with a road bike
Careful - a roadbike is a gateway drug to cycling.

In 2009 I bought a Cervelo P2 and rode it exclusively for 3 years. Then I got a road bike (actually a CX bike, but I put road wheels/tires on it).

The last 3 years I have not ridden my P2 more than a handful of times - only my my cycling club puts on a local TT race.

Anyways - if you are looking for a 'relaxed' roadbike, look at CX bikes as well. Unless you plan on doing road races or crits, it will do you for 99% of road biking applications, and you can swap tires and ride it in mud and gravel, and as a bonus - it tends to be cheaper and tougher than the weight weenie carbon fiber road race machines.
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