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Ironman St. George - TriathlonFull Ironman


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St. George, Utah
United States
World Triathlon Corporation
85F / 29C
Sunny
Total Time = 14h 48m 4s
Overall Rank = 668/
Age Group = F 35-39
Age Group Rank = 23/52
Pre-race routine:

Just be warned this is a long race report...I write them for me as a recollection of the race and days leading up to it to be able to remember and record the details and emotions of the day.

I'm starting writing this race report a week out on April 28th. We finished IMCoz in late November 2011 and I knew there was talk of StG in 2012. Brad was having his minor hip surgery and was waiting until he was recovered before signing up. I kept saying 2012 is the Year of Fun for me. No set training plan dictating every workout. No long training rides/runs. The ability to do what I want, have fun, and fall back in love with triathlons. After having late season IMs in 2010 and 2011 and following intense training, I wanted to just have fun. We were having a mild winter and didn't get any snow. I kept up with mid distance runs, weekday trainer rides and the weekend team trainer sessions. One day in the pool in mid-February, I decided I was going to sign up that night. I had been doing training and if my goal was to finish and have fun, I needed to bump up the volume a little. So about 10 weeks out, I signed up. I know I am such a sucker for peer pressure, but I had no pressure to sign up for this race from Brad, Craig or Heidi. I kept going back and forth on committing, but knew I would be disappointed being out at the race spectating instead of doing it. I was telling myself I was still riding some fitness from Cozumel and was excited to have a short training season. It meant I needed to get my long workouts in, but it was nice that the season wasn't 30 weeks long where I got burnt out. I actually found myself really enjoying the long training as it was still kind of a novelty.

We arrived in St. George on Thursday morning. After assembling the bikes, me, Brad, Craig and Heidi went to check in. Heidi and I did a short ride and I ran just to make sure the bike was good to go. We went to the athlete's dinner that evening. A very well run event. Especially after the disappointing Cozumel athlete's dinner. Back to the condo and in bed pretty early. The air conditioning wasn't working well and after a marginal night sleep, I was awake early and with a headache that lasted the entire day. I knew it was going to be hot on race day so I was dedicated to staying hydrated with GU tabs in addition to popping salt tabs. Friday morning, me, Brad and Craig drove to the reservoir as Heidi got some additional rest. The water temp was around 65 and after swimming in similar water a few weeks ago at Bumpass, I wasn't concerned about the temps. The water was cold to start, but after a few minutes, our bodies adapted and it was fine. We all had full sleeved wetsuits and I had both a regular cap and a neoprene cap. It was a sunny and warm day, but was also windy. We were swimming into the wind and chop on the way out to the first buoy before heading back to shore. We all commented on how the chop made it more challenging, but knew the weather forecast for race day was mid-80s with winds no more than 10 mph. More on that later....

Brad and I did a quick spin before racking our bikes and dropping off our T1 bag. We headed to the expo where Brad and I helped Kat at GU Sports on their panel nutrition discussion. We all drove the bike course after lunch. I studied the bike profile leading up to the race and this was where all of my pre-race anxiety rested. The first 22 miles of the bike course takes you from Sand Hollow Reservoir into town. From their, you do two 45 mile loops ending back in town. Once on the loops, the first 25 miles are net uphill with some significant climbs. The good news is that the last 20 miles of each loop is a fast, net downhill. As we drove the course, it's hard to tell how tough a climb will be once you're on your bike versus in the car. The one thing that was certain was the course was amazingly beautiful. Word or pictures don't do it justice. There are vast open views that make you feel so small. The scenery of the bike course changed as we continued to drive on. We saw other reservoirs, cattle along the road and beautiful red rocks for as far as you can see. While the course would be challenging, I felt I got in quality hill training and some of my pre-race anxiety started to go away. The famous climb on the course which you do twice is the Vejo Wall. It comes at miles 45 and 90 and lasts almost a mile. Before that though is actually a steeper climb that we all had some groans as we drove over. Approaching "the wall", we saw a sign telling us the road took a 180 degree turn. We made the turn and kept going up. The views from the wall climb were beyond words. You can see for miles and when looking down, can see the road we were just on below. The road back to town looked like it would be fast. The wind was forecasted to be a tailwind on race day to push us along. After driving the course, we dropped our T2 bags off near the finish line (split transition) and then the 4 racers grabbed dinner and relaxed at the condo before bed. With the help of 2 Tylenol PM, I was asleep before 10.
Event warmup:

The alarm went off at 3:45 am. Having not slept well the previous night, I was happy to have a solid nights sleep the night before the race. As our group started to awaken, I had 2 packs of oatmeal and some coffee. I found myself surprisingly calm. We gathered our bottles for the bike along with our Special Needs bike and run bags and drove to the finish area. Dropped our bags and boarded the busses for the 15 minute drive to the reservoir. We can always have a good time with our group and passed the time by laughing at old stories. Was also nice to get encouraging texts and Facebook posts that morning.

It was a cool morning and you could see the sky start to get brighter behind the rocky horizon. We got body marked, found a communal pump and hit the port-o-potties. Time was moving pretty quickly and I actually found it pretty easy to get a banana and a GU down. We put our wetsuits on and started towards the swim start. We ran into Amy, Nate and the boys and stopped to chat for a few. We still had 20 minutes and we knew we didn't want to be in the water that long before the gun went off. Regardless of how many races I do, the National Anthem always gets me on race day. I remember telling Heidi I was cold as I felt the wind start to pick up. We gave our hugs and "good lucks" and got in the water. Saying goodbye at the start of an Ironman is always a tear jerker for me. Even typing this days after the race, it gets me thinking about it.
Swim
  • 1h 19m 59s
  • 4224 yards
  • 01m 53s / 100 yards
Comments:

They said the water temp was around 63. I decided to not wear the neoprene cap and doubled up on caps (race cap plus one). The water felt cold, but I knew I'd warm up. I willed myself to put my face in as I swam to the start line. I found Heidi and she helped me get my bearings on the buoy line. While I knew the course, the buoys were hard to see. The cannon boomed and we were off. The course is a counterclockwise rectangle ending just a short ways away from the start. The first part of the swim was great! I found feet to draft off of. It wasn't very physical and my sighting was pretty good. I even thought to myself, "this is the best IM swim so far". I made the left turn at the end buoy and things had changed. The sun was blinding even with tinted goggles. I had a hard time seeing any buoys to get an idea of where to go. We were also getting hit with waves on our left side. I knew this meant a challenging swim. The swells were several feet and when they'd come crashing down, the spray made it feel like it was raining. I finally found the turn buoy and was now swimming into the headwind and waves. I found myself completely disoriented. On top of stopping a few time to de-fog my goggles, I was trying to figure out where to go. I saw swimmers around me, but it wasn't a pack and I had open water. The waves would pick you up and slam you down onto the water. We still had the spray and wind we were dealing with. And the waves were non-stop. In the ocean you get a break, but there was just wave after wave. The sound of the wind howling was just crazy. I tried breaststroking in hopes of spotting a buoy or a boat, but was out of luck. At one point while trying to sight, I said to myself, "I don't even know what way to go". With each stroke you made, you would either have your stroke be cut short by a crashing wave or felt like you were being pushed backwards and making no forward progress. I finally spotted a buoy and made a note of outline of the shapes of the rocks on the horizon for better sighting. I glanced at my watch some point saw I was at 55 minutes. I knew I was not going to hit the. 1:06 swim goal. I had no idea where I was on the course. There's a rock island I knew we needed to go around. It was then I saw a kayaker overturned in the water I was having cyclical conversations with myself: this is the craziest swim I've ever done, I have no idea where to go, just keep moving forward, I'm fine, I'm strong swimmer, I can't wait to get on the bike.

I think by a miracle, I found the turn buoy. But it was orange and not red like it should be. The red turn buoy had been blow over to the left near the island. I was finally able to see the buoy line back to shore. I later learned they had to take the "swim finish" arch down because of the winds. The waves and wind was now helping me along and I kept my eyes on the Tyr flags at the swim finish. Beyond surviving it, the highlight of my swim was being able to pee without having to stop. I am sure part of this is easier since I really don't kick. Either way, it was nice getting into T1 with an empty bladder. Approaching shore was an amazing feeling. That was the hardest swim I had ever been through and I was happy to have it behind me. The clock read 1:19 something and I was disappointed; however I have different feelings looking back now.
What would you do differently?:

Not sure there was anything more I could do. Maybe more insane OWS practice. I feel like I had fairly good control of my attitude during the swim, but found myself discouraged at times. I'd also take a dramamine. I am really prone to sea sickness on OWS. Brad even said to me on the bus ride to the reservoir, "did you bring dramamine" and my response was that the water would be calm and I wouldn't need it.
Transition 1
  • 06m 1s
Comments:

Immediately in front of the swim exit, I saw Amy and Ben. I remember trying not to curse in front of Ben who is 5. I told Amy that was the hardest swim ever. She said the weather turned so quickly and if the race started 15 minutes later, they would have cancelled the swim. She told me she was just waiting on Heidi to come out of the water. She wished me luck and I ran to the wetsuit strippers, grabbed my bag and into the T1 tent.

Let me say, the crowd support and volunteers were amazing. By far the best of all of the races I've done. In the tent, I had 4 women helping me. They were toweling me off and giving me words of encouragement. At one point, I had a volunteer on each arm rolling up my arm coolers and another putting on my socks and shoes. They were amazing. I got slathered by sunscreen and saw Craig with his bike ahead of me. I ran ahead and gave him an ass slap on the way to my bike. A volunteer met me part way down my row with my bike. Ran to the mount line and I was off.
What would you do differently?:

Nothing.
Bike
  • 8h 01m 12s
  • 112 miles
  • 13.97 mile/hr
Comments:

I was so happy to be out of the water and on my bike. That feeling didn't last very long. I immediately hit my watch timer to beep every 30 minutes so I'd remember to eat. Craig and I leapfrogged a bit here. The wind was a brutally strong, gusting head and crosswind. I attempted to stay aero, but the crosswinds were gusting and unpredictible. We finally made our first left turn which brough a tailwind. The first real climb is about 7 miles into the course with the rest of the road to St. George with rollers. I was cold to start, but soon warmed up. I remember seeing a sign right at the start of the bike that said "Don't worry - it will warm up". So true.

The plan was to eat every 30 minutes (GU/Chomps) with 2 salt tabs every hour. I had started the ride with 3 bottles of GU Roctane grape (240 calories each) mixed with pre-race and planned on using Perform after that. I am usually bad about hydration, but knew it would be a warm day and I'd get a migraine if I didn't stay on top of it.

I made it to the aid station at the park (mile 27) and hit the port-o-potty. I made it a quick stop, ditching my empty water bottle and picking up a bottle of water. From driving the course the day before, I knew the next 24 miles were uphill. What I wasn't ready for was the wind. It was relentless and strong. Most of the time it was a headwind, but you'd go around the corners of the road and get hit with a crosswind. I quickly switched my Garmin to a different screen so I wouldn't see my current or average pace. On my short ride the day before the race, I was having saddle comfort issues and knew they'd be there on race day. It was only a few miles into the ride that I just couldn't get comfortable aero without discomfort/pain. I'd been having this every now and then during training, but never an issue in previous seasons. So as I'm fighting the headwind knowing things would be easier if I were aero, it just isn't happening. I am at times in my smallest gear fighting the wind.

The course is amazingly beautiful and at times, takes your mind off of the suffering. After loosing my salt tabs in Cozumel from trying to get them out of my bento box, I didn't want the same thing happening. I already had a GU flask and chapstick stuffed in my cleavage and figured my salt tab container would be perfect there. It was a mental struggle knowing I was not far into the course and had to ride another loop of the hills and wind. Before the ride, I put a small sticker on my aerobar that said "live in the present" and a "you're fine" on my Garmin. I kept reminding myself to worry about where I was at that time - not what was in front of me. We rode through Gunlock and the aid station showing the sign "4 miles to the wall". I continued to eat every 30 minutes, but spaced this one out a bit so I wasn't riding up the wall having just eaten. Every aid station, I'd take a bottle of water and squirt it in my aero helmet vents, up the back and on my arm coolers. It wouldn't take long before it was dry again. It was warming up and the headwind was still blowing. Got to one of the significant climbs on the course. It's before the famous Vejo Wall and isn't as long, but it's steeper. There were already people walking their bikes up the hill on the first loop. Got to the top and let my HR recover on the other side. As you approach the wall, you see the sign with a 180 degree arrow showing you the road turns. Once I made the turn, it was an amazing feeling to have a tailwind. I hadn't felt that in hours. And I heard silence. The wind was no longer rushing past my ears and into my aerohelmet. I kept things as easy as I could climbing the wall. The views from the climb are probably the best on the course. You can see for miles on the horizon and when you look down, you can see the riders below on the road you were just on. The climb is about a mile and has a steeper part just as you get to the top. Such relief once I got to the top! Until I realized we were on a road for a few miles back into the brutal headwind. We made the right turn at the pie shop and enjoyed the tailwind and some downhill before a few more climbs (nothing compared to what we just did). My average pace before the downhill was 12.9. I don't think I've ever ridden that slowly. Ever. I rode past Special Needs and enjoyed the decents on the back part of the loop. The downhills were a nice break for my mind and legs. I rode what I could until I ran out of gears and just enjoyed the free speed.

Got back to the park and stopped to grab new bottles. I knew Amy and Nate were trying to make it to this part of the course and was hoping I'd see them as I needed a pick me up. By this point, I was 72 miles into the ride. I heard Amy yell "Wedemeyer" and I saw her, Nate and the boys. I didn't want to stop long, but just needed to have the mental break. At this point, I learned Heidi made it out of the water and everyone was on the course. Nate said Brad was ahead of me and Heidi was only a few miles behind me with Craig behind her. I was smiling and laughing, but even said to them I had no interest in going back out to face the wind for the second loop. The saddle discomfort was still there dispite reapplying chamois butter. I said my goodbyes and was off for lap two.

Thankfully, the winds died down a little and while they were still there, it was more of a direct headwind versus the cross/swirling winds. I went through my first two GU Roctaine bottles in the first 3 hours and it took me 2 hours to finish the last. I stopped at the aid station in Gunlock and picked up waters and a Perform. My stomach was getting iffy at this point. I knew I needed to continue eating as I still had a long day ahead of me. While the winds eased up a bit on the second loop, I was cooked from fighting them on the first loop. The hills were the same, but even small ones felt like mountains. While I made up speed on the first loop after the downhills, I knew my second loop was slower. I just kept telling myself to keep moving forward. Got to the climb before the wall and my legs had nothing - they were shaking. At the bigger climbs, my stomach would react and this hill was the same thing. I actually stopped riding, got off my bike and walked it up. I've never walked my bike up a hill in a race - ever. Quite the piece of humble pie. I was actually ok with it. I was doing what I needed to do to continue on and finish. Got to the wall and rode as much as I could of that until I walked the top steep part. One last stop at the aid station before the pie shop to get more bottles of water. I tried drinking the Perform, but it was too sweet. Grabbed 3 bottles of cold water and jammed some ice in my aero bottle (which didn't last long) and I was off. Turn at the pie shop, up, up, up and then enjoying the downhills. I was passing people at this point knowing I was so close to being off the bike. I knew I was slipping from my nutrition a bit, but tried to keep with eating every 30 and drinking water. One last climb you do once to get you back to town before turning onto the road which is the same as the run course. I was able to see Brad on his first lap and it looked like he was melting. Got teary eyed finishing the bike and knowing I'd just finished such a challenging ride. Rode into town and gladly handed off my bike.
What would you do differently?:

Hmm. Maybe more long/hilly rides, but I am not sure that would have helped. I had some really good training rides in. The day would have been so different if there wasn't the headwind. I heard at one point, it was steadily blowing at 25 mph with gusts up to 40. Mentally, it was a really hard ride. It was a huge help to know we had friends cheering us on at the race and countless people watching from all over. By far, the hardest ride I've done. Maybe not the hardest physically at times, but was just a tough day to be out on the bike. I am guessing we battled the headwind for nearly 70+ miles. Was thrilled to not have a migrane at the end of the ride and stick to my nutrition (for the most part).
Transition 2
  • 06m 7s
Comments:

Got into the T2 tent and I noticed an athlete in there with a pink top. It took me a second to realize it was Heidi. I am pretty sure the stars aligned with us being in T2 together. Looking back, she must have passed me around mile 85 when I was in a port-o-potty. Had a great volunteer who was doing Coeur d'Alene in a few weeks (her first). Heidi mentioned she'd wait for me and we'd go together. I told her I had no idea what I had in me and she said "same". Changed from bike shorts into tri shorts, got my salt tabs/med bag along with my "happy list" and I was off.
What would you do differently?:

As always, hurry the eff up. I was just so happy to be off the bike, I didn't really try to go faster.
Run
  • 5h 14m 45s
  • 26.21 miles
  • 12m 01s  min/mile
Comments:

We started out running and things felt great. I was so happy to be off the bike. The sun was high in the sky and it was still hot. We ran down the first arm of the M (downhill) and got to the first timing mat. Once we made the turn, my legs didn't agree with the uphill and I told Heidi I think I needed to run the downhills and walk the uphills and she could go ahead if she felt good. She said she was sticking with that plan and on we went. We saw Brad as we were walking (he was on his 2nd lap of the run and was running on the other side) and we told him to catch us. We kept the run/walk going and headed out on the longer out and back on Diagonal Street. The aid stations were all amazing. They had different themes and tons of volunteers that would do anything for you. Each aid station, I'd grab 2 sponges and put them in the top back of my tri top. The first GU went down fine, but the 2nd nearly came up. So I switched to coke and oranges at each aid station. My stomach was a little unsettled after making the transition, but ended up behaving for most of the run.

We were looking at our watches and kept hoping to see Craig make the bike cutoff. We ran the entire way back down Diagonal and did the short out and back before starting the 2nd loop. It was there we saw Amy, Nate, Craig and the boys. We stopped to chat and learned he got pulled at mile 83. We all felt awful, but he seemed to be in ok spirits about it. We started what was the girl's 2nd lap and Brad's last. For the most part, we were really consistent the entire race of running the downhills and walking the uphills. I carried the small Nathan water bottle with me and continued to quirt my head and arms with water to cool off (in addition to the sponges and ice in my tri top). Took a pre race pill somehwere in the 2nd lap along with some salt. We got to the out and back on Diagonal again and once we hit the turn around, Brad ran off to finish his race and break 13 hours. Before he left us, he commented that Heidi and I were badasses which made us laugh. Heidi and I were still in really high spirits, talking and laughing on the walking sections and staying focused on the running sections. If she was hurting, I couldn't tell.

We started our 2nd lap and were offered icy pops at the first aid station. Oh. My. God. This was the best thing EVER! We had them a few more times on the course. I've never seen them on the run before, but they were amazing. The sun was finally sinking low in the sky which gave us nearly all shade (versus the first loop which was hot and sunny).

On the last lap (somewhere on the "M" part of the course, I came out of the port-o-potty and Heidi had a huge smile on her face and pointed to a little girl who was volunteering. She was holding out this cupcake on her hand that looked amazing. Apparently, no one was taking her up on her offer and little did she know she ran into the right person. When I took it, she was so excited and the adult volunteer with her was screaming and yelling. Hilarious. I had a few bites and didn't want to make my stomach upset. It was dark mid-way through our last lap and we continued with the run/walk combo. Hit the out and back and was a great feeling to know we were almost done. People along the course would ask if the athletes if this was their final lap. The volunteers at the aid station were screaming and high fiving everyone. On the run (and throughout the day), I tried to thank as many volunteers as I could. They were amazing. The best out of the 7 IMs I've done. We hit the final turn around and said we'd run it in (about 1.5 miles all downhill). One last time, we thanked the volunteers and policemen for being out there. One volunteer said she helped me in T1 and was happy to see me out there on my last lap. Running at this point felt effortless. No pain. No aches. Just excitement. We made the turn for the really short out and back right near the finish. I am pretty sure I was smiling ear to ear at this point. We got ourselves together, as Heidi said - ditched our sponges and put our sunglasses and water bottles in our tri top pocket. I told Heidi she was going first down the chute because if she weren't there, I wasn't sure I would have kept up with the run/walk on the marathon. Tried to take the finish line in, high fiving people in the crowd and enjoying the moment. I swear, time in the finishing chute is on fast forward. Before you know it, you're done.
What would you do differently?:

Looking back now, days after the race, I am sure I could have run more of the marathon. My mind told my body it survived the swim and ride and then put me on autopilot for the run.
Overall though, I am happy with the marathon. Not one during the marathon did I have a low point as I have in every other race. I know part of that was running some of it with Brad and all of it with Heidi. The time flew by. I told Brad after the race that you know it's a challenging day when the marathon of an Ironman is the easy part.
Post race
Warm down:

The volunteer helped me get a shirt, hat and picture. I grabbed a chocolate milk and got a massage. Felt so good, but I was freezing at this point. Found our group and traded some stories from the day before getting our bikes and heading back to the condo.

What limited your ability to perform faster:

The wind. It would have been a different race if the wind was the 10 mph they predicted.

Event comments:

There is no doubt this was the hardest Ironman I've done. I've heard the DNF rate was at 28%. I know the women's field was only 18% and in looking at the finishers stats, it looks like only 47% of the women finished with the remainder being DNF or DNS.

It was an amazingly challenging experience that I wouldn't trade. And I don't regret signing up to do it one bit.




Last updated: 2012-03-25 12:00 AM
Swimming
01:19:59 | 4224 yards | 01m 53s / 100yards
Age Group: 10/52
Overall: 0/
Performance: Bad
Suit: Full wetsuit
Course: Square course counterclockwise in Sand Hollow Reservoir
Start type: Deep Water Plus: Shot
Water temp: 63F / 17C Current: High
200M Perf. Good Remainder: Bad
Breathing: Average Drafting: Below average
Waves: Below average Navigation: Bad
Rounding: Below average
T1
Time: 06:01
Performance: Average
Cap removal: Helmet on/
Suit off:
Wetsuit stuck? Run with bike:
Jump on bike:
Getting up to speed:
Biking
08:01:12 | 112 miles | 13.97 mile/hr
Age Group: 20/52
Overall: 0/
Performance: Below average
Wind: Headwind with gusts
Course: First 22 miles or so take you from Sand Hollow Reservoir to the town of St. George with rolling hills. From there, you ride 2 loops ending back in St. George. Each loop is ~45 miles with the first 25 or so net uphill with some significant climbs.
Road: Rough Dry Cadence:
Turns: Cornering:
Gear changes: Hills: Below average
Race pace: Hard Drinks: Not enough
T2
Time: 06:07
Overall: Below average
Riding w/ feet on shoes
Jumping off bike
Running with bike
Racking bike
Shoe and helmet removal
Running
05:14:45 | 26.21 miles | 12m 01s  min/mile
Age Group: 23/52
Overall: 0/
Performance: Average
1. 8:30 2. 11:18 3. 9:33 4. 13.08 5. 11.07 6 & 7. 29:57 8. 10:59 9. 12:02 10. 8:53 11 & 12: 24:36 13. 11:53 14. 12:45 15 & 16. 27:34 17. 10:09 18. 11:24 19. 9:36 20. 15:20 21. 12:26 22. 10:45 23. 13:45 24. 13:22 25. 12:40 26. 12:18
Course: 3 loops in downtown St. George in the shape of an M on the neighborhood roads with an out and back on Diagonal Street.
Keeping cool Good Drinking Just right
Post race
Weight change: %
Overall:
Mental exertion [1-5]
Physical exertion [1-5]
Good race?
Evaluation
Course challenge
Organized? Yes
Events on-time? Yes
Lots of volunteers? Yes
Plenty of drinks? Yes
Post race activities: Good
Race evaluation [1-5] 4

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2012-05-12 12:01 PM

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Subject: Ironman St. George


2012-05-12 12:08 PM
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Champion
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Subject: RE: Ironman St. George
Outstanding job!
2012-05-12 9:03 PM
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Subject: RE: Ironman St. George
A huge congratulations is in order.

tom
2012-05-13 7:45 PM
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Subject: RE: Ironman St. George

Thank you K!!!! It definitely changed my attitude when I saw you in the changing tent. It was soo much fun to run with you and Brad. Yes, we probably could have ran more, but then would we have ran any faster, not really sure since the 2nd and 3rd loop we have a couple of miles at or below 9min miles

You are one strong chick!!! So happy to have done it with you!!!

2012-05-13 10:33 PM
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Subject: RE: Ironman St. George

Great race report. The only one I've read so far that has described the beauty of the course. Loved all the details. Congratulations on gutting out and pacing such a tough race!

2012-05-13 11:04 PM
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Subject: RE: Ironman St. George
awesome! Well done!


2012-05-14 5:11 AM
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Master
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Subject: RE: Ironman St. George
Great race and RR!
2012-05-14 8:11 AM
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Subject: RE: Ironman St. George
3558 here.
2012-05-14 9:47 AM
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Master
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Subject: RE: Ironman St. George
That was a great RR Kristin.

It was great following you online and I am so happy you and Brad finished - you are totally a bad$ss for finishing that race.
Z
2012-05-14 12:41 PM
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Subject: RE: Ironman St. George
Complete and amazing bad --ery!!!!! Congrats to you and Brad!
Z
2012-05-14 12:46 PM
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Subject: RE: Ironman St. George
the BT ate the word above that is a synonymous to a butt.


2012-05-14 2:23 PM
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Subject: RE: Ironman St. George
Who's a bada$$???

So so happy for you.

Live in the present!!
2012-05-16 12:52 PM
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Subject: RE: Ironman St. George

I think it was really smart of you to spot part of the landscape in the water beyond the bouy - that's taught to all Marines in their navigation class and I don't think I would have thought of it in the water.

 

Great work!

2012-05-16 2:01 PM
in reply to: #4206182

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Elite
3770
200010005001001002525
Subject: RE: Ironman St. George
She puts all the boys to shame!!! Dare I say I'd consider that if they had it again. Sounds spectacular. And you just had an amazing mary on top of it. I'm honored to be a part of team bad decision.
2012-07-10 11:15 PM
in reply to: #4206182

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Extreme Veteran
471
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Northern Virginia
Subject: RE: Ironman St. George
So proud of you. you were amazingly strong out there and you and heidi were definitely an inspiration. i hated the power walking, but being out there with you both was so great and got me through some tough times.
I'm not sure there is anything you can't do.
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